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The cities and communities ....the present and the future - urban change.NET -
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Sky City, China: World's tallest prefab building breaks ground in June #smartcities

Sky City, China: World's tallest prefab building breaks ground in June #smartcities | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Sky City in Changsha, China, will be 2750 feet tall, 220 stories, housing 30,000 people in 4450 apartments, with excavation and construction slated to begin in June, 2013.

 

Aiming to accommodate a growing population, the skyscraper is considered a "pragmatic" building, designed for efficiency, affordability, replicability.

The Sky City concept significantly reduces the per capita use of land, and the associated CO2 emissions generated, thus providing a means of large-scale development with a significantly lower impact on the environment.

 

As a result, a resident of Sky City will be using 1/100th the average land per person- learn more about this innovative building concept and its sustainable features at Treehugger.

 


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Sofi Lapizco's curator insight, May 19, 2013 12:05 AM

En esto se muestra el diseño de un edificio el cual fue pensado en algunos de los gustos de las demas personas, pensado para que sea atractivo para todos y llamativo.


Sky City en Changsha, China, será 2.750 metros de altura, 220 pisos, viviendas 30.000 personas en 4.450 viviendas, con la excavación y la construcción debieran comenzar en junio de 2013.


Con el objetivo de dar cabida a una población cada vez mayor, el rascacielos se considera un edificio "pragmático", diseñado para la eficiencia, la asequibilidad, la replicabilidad.

El concepto Sky City reduce significativamente el uso per cápita de la tierra, y las emisiones de CO2 asociadas generadas, lo que proporciona un medio para el desarrollo a gran escala con un impacto mucho menor sobre el medio ambiente.


Como resultado, un residente de la ciudad del cielo va a utilizar 1/100o la tierra media por persona de aprender más acerca de este concepto innovador edificio y sus características sostenibles en Treehugger.

Robert T. Preston's curator insight, June 2, 2013 1:24 PM

Article about the new megalithic "Sky City" building breaking ground, this month.  A half mile tall, it will be huge, and will cut the human footprint down considerably, from people with standard homes.

Robert T. Preston's comment, June 6, 2013 9:33 PM
My wife works with the Chinese on many projects. They are quite ambitious, but occasionally, their ambition gets ahead of safety, and quality control. Let's hope that with this beast, they get it all right.
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Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.

 

“Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...


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Linda Alexander's curator insight, April 20, 2013 4:47 PM

Whoa..Chicago!

Geovanni's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 11:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.
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Visualizing a Walkable City

Visualizing a Walkable City | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

The city of Pontevedra in northwest Spain has become a leader in walker-friendly urban policy over the past 15 years. As the capital of its province, county and municipality, Pontevedra attracted enough automobile commuters each day to overwhelm its antiquated streets.

In response, instead of razing old buildings and constructing bigger roads, the city council widened sidewalks, established a free bike-lending service, installed speed bumps and set a speed limits of 30 kilometers per hour. They even banned motorized transport in sections of Pontevedra. Walking zones now extend from the historic center to streets and squares in newer neighborhoods. Although the driving ban initially faced resistance, it is now broadly supported and has become an essential part of the city's identity as an attractive place to live...

 

To further improve walkability, Pontevedra's city council produced a map that visualizes the distances and travel times between key places on foot. Known as Metrominuto, the map has color-coded lines that resemble those of a subway guide. Free parking areas are marked to encourage visitors to leave their cars outside the city center. Metrominuto reminds residents and visitors that many automobile trips can be made in a more convenient, environmentally friendly and healthy way by walking.


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ryanleonard's comment, April 20, 2013 7:25 AM
nice
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Ideas on transforming cities - Singapore a case study

Ideas on transforming cities - Singapore a case study | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

'We know that the planet is warming up and the human population is growing, raising our demand for resources. The combination of these factors is why the battle against climate change will be decided in cities, particularly cities in the Asia-Pacific.

These urban centres are triple ‘hot spots’: they face rising temperatures, increasing populations and escalating consumption.

To tackle these challenges, we need practical and successful ideas that can easily be replicated.

 

At the 4th Sustainable Cities Conference last week in Singapore, I discussed ways for Singapore and Hong Kong, already recognised as innovative cities in tackling these problems, to become even greener and establish themselves as leaders in creating sustainable city models for the Asia-Pacific.'


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Luiz F. Costa's comment, May 14, 2013 9:23 AM
E isso temos que incentivar.
Norm Miller's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:49 AM

Singapore transformed it's economy faster than any other nation in the world.  It is not surprising to see them leading on other dimensions as well.

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Data Farming: Demonstrating the Benefits of Urban Agriculture [INFOGRAPHIC]

Data Farming: Demonstrating the Benefits of Urban Agriculture [INFOGRAPHIC] | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Design Trust put together a metrics framework that measured the associated activities of urban agriculture with the known benefits derived from various studies to convince city officials of urban farming's positive impact.


Transforming underutilized land into productive urban farms was one of the many topics which were presented at the recent Kansas City Design Week.  Jerome Chou, past Director of Programs at the Design Trust for Public Space, presented his unique experience with the implementation of the Five Boroughs Farm in New York City and the impact that urban agriculture can have on low-income areas of a city.

Chou pointed out that having the land available for an urban farm is only half of the battle. The other half involves changing local zoning laws, influencing political opinion, garnering economic support, and proving the project will have a net benefit to a community...


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Marcus Taylor's curator insight, August 4, 2013 3:40 AM

Urban Agriculture faces a myriad of challenges to enter the mainstream of urban development in the pursuit of "SmartCities" Worth a browse.

Daniel Moura's curator insight, January 23, 4:22 AM
Many cities (like NYC) are leaving old prejudices behind and are converting green areas and unused land to urban agriculture. Improving food security and resilience, reduce city's ecological footprint, supporting pollinators, increasing biodiversity and building sense of community are just a few examples of the benefits it provides