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The cities and communities ....the present and the future - urban change.NET -
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The Rhythm of #City. By @varvara_g | #socialdata #art

luiy's insight:

The Rhythm of City is an art piece that points out an innovative and artistic way for applying geo-located social data as a score. At the same time, the data represents a city's pace of life. The goal is to metaphorically describe locations by extracting geo-tagged content of Twitter, Flickr, Youtube, and translating it into the rhythm of a physical metronome in real time. In short, a metronome represents a city. The audience is given a chance to discover and experience an alternative way of perceiving different locations and have a bird's view on urban digital landscapes. Our concerns are about the malleability of the digital world to the physical one, and the interpretation of social data for artistic purposes.


The installation is a sonic and at the same time visual interface for perceiving the urban life and culture of different locations. Moreover, it gives an alternative meaning and purpose to the location-specific invisible online data.

 

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Build a #smartcity | #data #sensors

Build a #smartcity | #data #sensors | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Vast information infrastructures are creating new challenges for future cities
luiy's insight:

Agility is key


With such diverse information flying around a smart city, new technology is needed to coordinate not only this vast amount of data, but also the array of applications it may have.

 

One solution to coordinate data is an “agile network” – a system that uses new technology to automatically control and configure data. This data can also be disseminated across a number of varying devices.

 

Chinese company Huawei Enterprise is one firm helping to build these agile networks, as well as the cloud computing data centres that they hope will help make Smart Cities a reality.

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"Natural #Cities" Emerge from Social Media Location #Data | #context #planing

"Natural #Cities" Emerge from Social Media Location #Data | #context #planing | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Nobody agrees on how to define a city. But the emergence of “natural cities” from social media data sets may change that, say computational geographers.
luiy's insight:

Jiang and Miao began with a dataset from the Brightkite social network, which was active between 2008 and 2010. The site encouraged users to log in with their location details so that they could see other users nearby. So the dataset consists of almost 3 million locations in the US and the dates on which they were logged.

To start off, Jiang and Miao simply placed a dot on a map at the location of each login. They then connected these dots to their neighbours to form triangles that end up covering the entire mainland US.

 

Next, they calculated the size of each triangle on the map and plotted this size distribution, which turns out to follow a power law. So there are lots of tiny triangles but only a few large ones.

 

Finally, the calculated the average size of the triangles and then coloured in all those that were smaller than average. The coloured areas are “natural cities”, say Jiang and Miao.

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NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost | #smartcities #dataviz

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost | #smartcities #dataviz | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Even for the most direction-savvy New Yorker, emerging from the dark pit of the subway can be a disorienting experience. New York City streets are bright, they’re loud, oftentimes they’re smelly, and worst of all, maps are virtually non-existent. Or at least that used to be the case.

 

Just this week, the Department of Transportation unveiled its WalkNYC initiative, a program that will bring comprehensive pedestrian maps to all five boroughs. In a city where an estimated 30 percent of all trips are made by foot and one out of every three locals can’t tell north from south, they’re probably going to come in handy.

 

Though NYC’s public transportation is top-notch and we are technically on a grid, it’s easy to get lost or overwhelmed when traveling by foot. That’s why the DOT enlisted the help of PentaCityGroup, a consortium of urban planners, engineers, designers, cartographers and geographical information specialists, to solve the problem.

Their goal? To create an information-packed map that would orient pedestrians and help them find the gems each NYC neighborhood has to offer. The first of these new information kiosks was installed earlier this week in Chinatown (they’re already located at every Citi Bike station), and it’s expected that others will be popping up in midtown Manhattan, Long Island City in Queens and Prospect Heights in Brooklyn this summer


Via Lauren Moss
luiy's insight:

If the style of these maps looks familiar, that’s because it is. The design team wanted to marry the current design to the graphic language that was was established for the subway system in the late 1960s. The typeface is still Helvetica (albeit with a slight twist–the type’s square dots are now round) and it uses the same organizational conventions (white type on a dark background). “All of this was deliberately echoing the way the subways look,” Bierut explains. “We wanted people to be able to ride the subway, come out and orient themselves.” Bierut says the design of the maps is meant to be accurate, trustworthy and friendly. But not too friendly—this is New York City, after all. “We wanted these things to be beautiful in a way, but also characteristic of the best of New York.”

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ParadigmGallery's comment, July 8, 2013 4:02 PM
great...can't wait to try these...
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4 New Ways Of Thinking That Should Shape The Next Century Of Cities | #Collaborative #urban #data

4 New Ways Of Thinking That Should Shape The Next Century Of Cities | #Collaborative #urban #data | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
In order to thrive over the next century cities will have to change. Here's how.

 

Last week, the Ditchley Foundation in Oxford, England, hosted over 30 academics, practitioners, government, and non-governmental organization leaders from five continents to contemplate the rapid urbanization of the globe and address challenges and opportunities across multiple geographies, economies, and political landscapes.

 

Visit the link to find specific insights and processes that could significantly shape how we think about global cities over the next century.


Via Lauren Moss, Claude Emond
luiy's insight:

MENTAL MODELS AND CHANNELS TO ACCELERATE "CHEMICAL REACTIONS"

 

We still seem to be looking at our 21st-century cities largely through a 20th-century lens. This is limiting the alchemy, not catalyzing it. Urban planning remains largely focused just on the physical environment, not on socio-economic results. Community is moving towards becoming a question of 'geographic cohesion,' not geographic place in a traditional sense. There was great conversation about not trying to retrofit old models of working, but rather adapting the way people and cities work with newly available channels and technologies.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:27 PM

The Internet, big data, and social media should result in more responsive planning, better service delivery, and broader citizen engagement. Technology should redefine transportation to seamlessly marry centrally scheduled buses and trains with more spontaneous options such as car and bike sharing, as well as the informal systems of cabs, motorcycles, and rickshaws that dominate in many developing countries. Ubiquitous, open public, and private data should make human health and well-being as easily and regularly measured as GDP.

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:15 PM

Fascinating, and intuitive.

 

A nation is just a network of cities, connected economically, socially and culturally.  A region of the world is just a network of interlaced economic forces that can either be for the benefit (the EU or ECOWAS) or the detriment (NAFTA) of the people who live in the territories under the given region.  The same could be said about strategic partnerships (NATO or the AU).

 

Combine it all together, and you've got the planet.

 

"The control of a large force is the same principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers."       -Sun Tzu

 

What works on the city level may be applicable to the nation, the region and the world as a whole.

 

Think about it.

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How a New Science of #Cities Is Emerging from #Mobile Phone #Data Analysis | #situational #context

How a New Science of #Cities Is Emerging from #Mobile Phone #Data Analysis | #situational #context | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Study the way people make mobile phone calls in metropolitan areas and you can see a city breathe, say computer scientists.
luiy's insight:

These guys begin with a database of mobile phone calls made by people in the 31 Spanish cities that have populations larger than 200,000. The data consists of the number of unique individuals using a given cell tower (whether making a call or not) for each hour of the day over almost two months.

 

Given the area that each tower covers, Louail and co work out the density of individuals in each location and how it varies throughout the day. And using this pattern, they search for “hotspots” in the cities where the density of individuals passes some specially chosen threshold at certain times of the day.

 

The results reveal some fascinating patterns in city structure. For a start, every city undergoes a kind of respiration in which people converge into the center and then withdraw on a daily basis, almost like breathing. And this happens in all cities. This “suggests the existence of a single ‘urban rhythm’ common to all cities,” says Louail and co.

 

During the week, the number of phone users peaks at about midday and then again at about 6 p.m. During the weekend the numbers peak a little later: at 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. Interestingly, the second peak starts about an hour later in western cities, such as Sevilla and Cordoba.

 
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Datascaping And Designing With Information | #dataviz #urbanism

Datascaping And Designing With Information | #dataviz #urbanism | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

DataAppeal software provides an alternative to complex mapping tools through an easy to use, web-based GIS application that renders typical data files into beautifully designed multi-dimensional maps and datascapes instantly. For architects, landscape architects, urban planners and designers of the built form, the application is a great tool to utilize evidence-based information to expose new site patterns, to provide alternative 3D modes of mapping for communication purposes, and to aid in the initiation of master plan designs.

It’s also a refreshing way to visually engage professional and students with their site-based data...


Via Lauren Moss
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burlysand's comment, September 24, 2013 3:28 AM
Pretty simple..
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12 Fresh Ideas for Transforming the Places We Live With Open Data

12 Fresh Ideas for Transforming the Places We Live With Open Data | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

A few of the 886 proposals from the Knight Foundation's latest open government news challenge.

 

This year, the Knight News Challenge has been soliciting project proposals to open and leverage government data anywhere at the national, state and local levels (in the U.S. and abroad). As of last week, 886 projects are vying for a share of the $5 million in funding, all in response to this question: "How can we make the places we live more awesome through data and technology?"

 

Amid all of the submissions are innovations we've already encountered at Atlantic Cities: a favorite guerrilla wayfinding campaign from Raleigh, North Carolina; Code for America's playful StreetMix web app; the San Francisco-based Urban Prototyping Festival; and a community-driven transportation planning project based on the kind of data analytics we wrote about here. But that's barely scratching the surface of all the proposals that Knight has corralled.

Visit the article link for a list of 12 ideas from the competition that are new and worth developing (with the applicants' description of their programs). On the 29th, Knight plans to announce a set of semifinalists, who will be invited to complete more detailed proposals. The final winners (there's no predetermined number of them) will then be announced in June...


Via Lauren Moss
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Lauren Moss's curator insight, April 1, 2013 4:06 PM

Innovative ideas on how to utilize open data and communication technology to enhance communities, engage citizens and empower local governments in a variety of ways...