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Une ville numérique a urbaniser rapidement pour éviter la tour de Babel

Une ville numérique a urbaniser rapidement pour éviter la tour de Babel | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
La ville numérique est très tendance en ce début d'année! Au moins pour les chargés de communication territoriale. Quelle réalité se cache derrière ces projets et n'est-il pas temps de laisser rentrer les bâtisseurs du numérique...

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Sky-high horticulture: Shenzhen's 'farmscraper' plan

Sky-high horticulture:  Shenzhen's 'farmscraper' plan | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Conceived in response to a densely populated Chinese city's unchecked growth, Asian Cairns is an ambitious take on vertical farming.

 

A Belgian architect recently unveiled the 79-acre masterplan for Asian Cairns, a dizzying new vision of urban vertical farming in China. Consisting of a sextet of “sustainable monoliths for rural urbanity” — stacked, pebble-esque, steel-ringed transparent pods that are powered by both vertical wind turbines and photovoltaics — Vincent Callebaut Architects’ Asian Cairns is planned for the rapidly swelling, skyscraper-heavy port city of Shenzhen in the southern province of Guangdong north of Hong Kong.Beyond agricultural concerns, Asian Cairns is envisioned as a mixed-use development that also incorporates residential, retail, and recreational areas. Imagined as being completely emissions-free and producing more energy than they consume, the Cairns were conceived in direct response to Shenzhen’s unchecked urban development and the population growth and increased pollution levels that have accompanied it...


Via Lauren Moss
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Duane Craig's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:00 PM

Really cool, but I bet it will be a real challenge and expense to build it. Look at all the curved glass.

ParadigmGallery's curator insight, March 19, 2013 1:08 PM

TY Lauren Moss...

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Case Study in Efficiency: SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea

Case Study in Efficiency:  SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

SOM’s Diagonal Tower in Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea, is a case study in efficiency – the 343 meter tall tower successfully minimizes wind loads, reduces construction costs, provides dramatic views and meets strict energy codes by integrating massing, structure and performance.

 

The design of this landmark skyscraper, with glazed triangular facets, employs passive environmental control strategies within and on the façade – sunshades are positioned at varying angles on each building exposure, mitigating heat gain in the summer and permitting direct sunlight to warm the building’s interiors during the cold winter months. Triple pane glazed exterior curtain wall decreases energy loss, while active chilled beam system surpasses traditional air driven systems, using water as a medium for transferring heating and cooling energy, which results in less energy consumption along with great environmental comfort for building users...

 


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Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:10 AM

A really interesting and amazing building. Very self sufficient and really quite fascinating. It's enery-efficient and great to look at simultaneously.

Kang ji yun 's curator insight, May 25, 2013 11:59 PM

It is very wonderful building!! when it comes to the diagonal tower, it serves more than visual stimuli. Even though the Diagonal Tower is similar to Norman Foster's Hearst Tower in New York, it's megaframe reduces the amount of steel required by over 25% when compared to conventionally framed buildings.

Amelia's comment, May 26, 2013 9:59 AM
I hope we have one also in Daejeon.. hehe..
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Urbanism Speakeasy | Smart Cities and Climate Capitalism | Sustainable Cities Collective

Urbanism Speakeasy | Smart Cities and Climate Capitalism | Sustainable Cities Collective | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Urbanism Speakeasy is a podcast with a particular focus on human-scale design.
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Call for Artists/Architects/Designers: SMART Cities & HYBRID Identities . Venice | ArtExpo Official Site

Call for Artists/Architects/Designers: SMART Cities & HYBRID Identities . Venice | ArtExpo Official Site | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
RT @lucacurci_com: Call for Artists/Show your talent in Venice!!! January 25, 2013!!! http://t.co/oYipOM1T http://t.co/UfBmb0RT @itsliquid @artexpogroup

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judycurtis's curator insight, January 1, 2013 6:01 PM

The artistic side of Smart Cities to start off the New Year. Performance artists and magnificent venue to caper around in. 

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Future Cities Report - The 10 Smartest Cities in Asia/Pacific | Future Cities

Future Cities Report - The 10 Smartest Cities in Asia/Pacific | Future Cities | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

A comprehensive look at the top 10 cities in Asia/Pacific -- comparison according to Smart Cities criteria laid out by Boyd Cohen.


Via judycurtis
luiy's insight:

The phrase "smart cities" has only emerged in the past few years, yet conferences, companies, citizens, and cities around the globe have become enamored with the concept. After all, who wants to live in a dumb city?

Still, the field has yet to reach consensus on a definition for "smart cities," let alone on how to compare one city to another in the same country, or around the globe.

 

As a researcher and consultant, I have been working on two primary initiatives to resolve these issues. The first, as reported here in December, was the development of the Smart Cities Wheel, a holistic tool for developing and implementing smart cities strategies: .......

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Cluster #IoT - CITC's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:40 AM

add your insight...

 

 
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People who complain about cities ...

RT @SolenneCucchi: People who complain about cities not having enough green space might just need to think outside the box a bit. http://t.co/S2R0Afiviq
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AFRICAN URBANISM

AFRICAN URBANISM | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
On African urban areas, city design, urban planning and urban development.

 


Via Ana Valdés
luiy's insight:
ABOUTWest Africa. Vibrant, dynamic, evolving and forever interesting urban spaces and communities blend rural, traditional and modern elements. This is what I'm writing about. READ MORE
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A design pattern for digital urbanism: the City Information Partnership

A design pattern for digital urbanism: the City Information Partnership | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
(In “Do we need a Pattern Language for Smarter Cities” I suggested that “design patterns“, a tool for capturing re-usable experience invented by the town-planner Christopher Alexander, might offer ...
luiy's insight:

In “Do we need a Pattern Language for Smarter Cities” I suggested that “design patterns“, a tool for capturing re-usable experience invented by the town-planner Christopher Alexander, might offer a useful way to organise our knowledge of successful approaches to “Smarter Cities”. I’m now writing a set of design patterns to describe ideas that I’ve seen work more than once. The collection is described and indexed in “A Pattern Language for Digital Urbanism” which can be found from the link in the navigation bar of this blog).

 




Design Pattern: City Information Partnership


Summary of the pattern: a collaboration between city institutions, communities, service providers and research institutions to share and exploit city data in a socially and financially sustainable system.

City systems, communities and infrastructures affected:

(This description is based on the elements of Smarter City ecosystems presented in ”The new Architecture of Smart Cities“).

Goals: Any.People: Citizens; innovators.Ecosystem: All.Soft infrastructures: Innovation forums; networks and community organisations.City systems: Any.Hard infrastructures: Information and communications technology.


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Megacities as sites of change

Megacities as sites of change | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Guest bloggers sound off on solutions for the future. Eight change accelerators in energy, mobility and design start the conversation, and you join in.

Via Alessio Erioli, proto-e-co-logics
luiy's insight:

Megacities are our future: There are more than 20 megacities in the world today and by 2025 there will be around 30 of them. They are home to more than 10 million people and sprawl for hundreds of kilometers. Their projected rapid expansion by the middle of this century will drive our economies and shape our lives. But they are not carefully designed superstructures; instead, they are aggregations of building developments that spread like weeds over already stressed infrastructures. Megacities offer the greatest opportunities and challenges for humankind in the 21st century as they exist at the interface where urban systems meet technology to support human development.

 

With the appropriate infrastructures supporting them, combined technologies can form qualitatively new kinds of engagement between buildings and the megacity environment. An exploratory project between Astudio architects and AVATAR examines the potential for upgrading the environmental performance of entire buildings in situ. The structural bones of buildings are kept in place and pruned as fit for purpose frameworks, without having to displace existing inhabitants, which are then re-wrapped with living facades. These are the next generation of functional vertical gardens that are colonized by microorganisms and life-like chemistries that assist with the lifecycles of buildings being able to process waste and make biofuels using local resources.

Architecture does not need to be limited by inert surfaces, which create a barrier between people and the environment but could directly engage the surroundings through active interfaces which act as vast synthetic soils. These might be maintained under surveillance by smart microfluidics monitoring systems and robotic gardeners. A taste of these dynamic geotextiles can be experienced in the architectural installation Hylozoic Ground, a finalist for the Katerva Award insustainability. This jungle-like technology is a prototype for living building surfaces that combine cybernetics with smart chemistry. The immersive, evolving technology offers a responsive framework for a new kind of architectural experience that senses people and the environment and whose principles may be applied in other contexts, such as gardens. Hylozoic Ground could even offer its inhabitants positive emotional experiences similar to being close to nature.

The grand vision of achieving positive human development in the 21st century will require effective coordination between disciplines, institutions, cultures, and geographical regions. The pressing concerns that affect us all are many and varied—and would require humanity to perform at its very best to secure a long-term partnership with this unstable earth that is our home.

 

 

 

Questions:

What are the challenges to developing and implementing a global vision of positive human development?

How can developed countries best transfer knowledge to the Global South?

How can combined technologies in cities help address significant social inequalities?

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TechCrunch | A City Is A Startup: The Rise Of The Mayor-Entrepreneur

TechCrunch | A City Is A Startup: The Rise Of The Mayor-Entrepreneur | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
On stage at last month's Le Web conference Shervin Pishevar, a Managing Director at Menlo Ventures, stated "The World is a Startup." It's an interesting perspective and I think what's true for the world is also true for countries, states and cities.

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Urban Network Analysis: A Toolbox for ArcGIS 10 / 10.1

luiy's insight:
The City Form Lab has released a state-of-the-art toolbox for urban network analysis. As the first of its kind, this ArcGIS toolbox can be used to compute five types of graph analysis measures on spatial networks: Reach; Gravity; Betweenness; Closeness; and Straightness. 
The tools incorporate three important features that make them particularly suited for spatial analysis on urban street networks. First, they can account for both geometry and topology in the input networks, using either metric distance (e.g. Meters) or topological distance (e.g. Turns) as impedance factors in the analysis. Second, unlike previous software tools that operate with two network elements (nodes and edges), the UNA tools include a third network element - buildings - which are used as the spatial units of analysis for all measures. Two neighboring buildings on the same street segments can therefore obtain different accessibility results. And third, the UNA tools optionally allow buildings to be weighted according to their particular characteristics - more voluminous, more populated, or otherwise more important buildings can be specified to have a proportionately stronger effect on the analysis outcomes, yielding more accurate and reliable results to any of the specified measures. The tools are aimed at urban designers, architects, planners, geographers, and spatial analysts who are interested in studying the spatial configurations of cities, and their related social, economic, and environmental processes. The toolbox is built for easy scaling - it is equally suited for small-scale, detailed network analysis of dense urban areas as it is for sparser large-scale regional networks.  The toolbox requires ArcGIS 10 software with an ArcGIS Network Analyst Extension.
Credits: Andres Sevtsuk, Michael Mekonnen.
Please send your comments, questions, and feedback to cityform_rg@mit.edu
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Smartcities: Vertical Farming Is Key to the...

Smartcities: Vertical Farming Is Key to the... | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
smartercities: “ Vertical Farming Is Key to the Smart Cities of the Future | STATETECH Smart cities could look very different from today’s urban centers. Streetlights could be communicating with bus...
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Crowdsourcing - Climate CoLab. MIT Center for Collective Intelligence

Crowdsourcing - Climate CoLab. MIT Center for Collective Intelligence | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

The Climate CoLab seeks to harness collective intelligence through online contests. Anyone in the world can contribute their ideas to CoLab contests, but experts play an important role, too.

 

luiy's insight:

About the projectObjective

 

The goal of the Climate CoLab is to harness the collective intelligence of thousands of people from all around the world to address global climate change.

 

Inspired by systems like Wikipedia and Linux, the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence has developed this on-line forum where citizens create, analyze, and select detailed proposals for what to do about climate change.

Approach

 

Anyone can join the Climate CoLab community and participate. Community members are invited to submit and comment on proposals outlining what they think should be done about climate change. In some contests, computerized simulation models project the environmental and economic outcomes of the proposed actions proposed. Experts review and evaluate the proposals, and both experts and community members select the most promising proposals. For more, see How the CoLab works.

Activity to date

 

As of late 2012, more than 40,000 people from all over the world have visited the Climate CoLab, and over 4,000 have registered as members. The community's most recent annual contest, in 2011, addressed the topic: How should the 21st century economy evolve bearing in mind the risks of climate change?

 

Winning proposals came from teams with members in the US, Nigeria, India, and Australia. In January 2012, representatives of the winning teams presented their ideas in briefings at the United Nations in New York and the US Congress in Washington, DC. For more see History of the Climate CoLab.

New approach for 2012-2013

 

In 2012-13, the Climate CoLab is dividing the overall problem of climate change into many different sub-problems (like how to reduce emissions from electric power generation in the largest emitting countries or how city governments can adapt to climate change).

 

For each key sub-problem, experts in the area will advise community members as they develop proposals. After the contests end, the winning proposals will be presented to people and organizations who could actually implement them.

 

In later contests, community members will develop integrated proposals that bring together elements from many different sub-problems into overall solutions for entire countries, regions, or the whole world.

Outcome

 

By constructively engaging a broad range of scientists, policy makers, business people, investors, and concerned citizens, we hope the Climate CoLab will help to develop, and gain support for, climate change plans that are better than any that would have otherwise been developed.

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Visualizing a Walkable City

Visualizing a Walkable City | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

The city of Pontevedra in northwest Spain has become a leader in walker-friendly urban policy over the past 15 years. As the capital of its province, county and municipality, Pontevedra attracted enough automobile commuters each day to overwhelm its antiquated streets.

In response, instead of razing old buildings and constructing bigger roads, the city council widened sidewalks, established a free bike-lending service, installed speed bumps and set a speed limits of 30 kilometers per hour. They even banned motorized transport in sections of Pontevedra. Walking zones now extend from the historic center to streets and squares in newer neighborhoods. Although the driving ban initially faced resistance, it is now broadly supported and has become an essential part of the city's identity as an attractive place to live...

 

To further improve walkability, Pontevedra's city council produced a map that visualizes the distances and travel times between key places on foot. Known as Metrominuto, the map has color-coded lines that resemble those of a subway guide. Free parking areas are marked to encourage visitors to leave their cars outside the city center. Metrominuto reminds residents and visitors that many automobile trips can be made in a more convenient, environmentally friendly and healthy way by walking.


Via Lauren Moss
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ryanleonard's comment, April 20, 2013 7:25 AM
nice
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Cette semaine le Vinvinteur s’intéresse aux Fab Labs, aux hackerspaces et au DIY

Cette semaine le Vinvinteur s’intéresse aux Fab Labs, aux hackerspaces et au DIY | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Au milieu des années 1990,  Neil Gershenfeld, chercheur au sein du MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) a décidé de créer un cours pour ses étudiants appelé: "comment créer n'importe quoi?

Via JP Fourcade, judycurtis
luiy's insight:

Au milieu des années 1990,  Neil Gershenfeld, chercheur au sein du MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) a décidé de créer un cours pour ses étudiants appelé: « comment créer n’importe quoi? ». C’est ainsi que le Fab Lab est né.

Littéralement « Fabrication Laboratory« , ils ont été créés pour sensibiliser les jeunes à la fabrication numérique. Objectif : piloter des machines-outils pour fabriquer des objets réels conçus à partir d’un ordinateur. Une révolution dans le monde de l’artisanal.

L’idée initiale visait à mettre à disposition, dans un même espace, tout le nécessaire pour mener à bien un projet personnel, depuis le principe technique, jusqu’au prototype. À disposition: du matériel électronique, informatique et des machines-outils allant de la coupeuse à bois à la découpe laser.

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Corinne Mayer's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:24 AM

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Smart Grid: From smart grids to smart cities: Japan plays key role

Smart Grid: From smart grids to smart cities: Japan plays key role | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Smart Grid - Japan put an URGENT! stamp on its smart cities/smart grid efforts following 2011's disastrous combination of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown.

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La ville, ce jeu « massivement multijoueurs » | Knowtex

La ville, ce jeu « massivement multijoueurs » | Knowtex | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Entre ces maquettes qui modélisent nos villes en 3D pour aider les urbanistes, et le rôle accru des citoyens dans la fabrique de la ville, rapprocher notre environnement urbain d'un « jeu massivement multi-joueurs » n'aura jamais été aussi facile.
luiy's insight:

A Futur en Seine, qui s’ouvrait ce jeudi 14 juin à Paris, l’atelier« Futurs possibles », organisé par l’agence de modélisation cartographique 3D Vectuel, explorait le futur de la ville. Comment lestechnologies numériques modifient-elles les façons de présenter, de valoriser et de comprendre la ville et le territoire ? C’était la question au cœur de la présentation, qu’a suivi une table ronde réunissant des spécialistes de la ville, physique et… numérique, pour discuter des contours d’une nouvelle « intelligence territoriale ».

> La modélisation 3D pour faire partager le projet urbain

Imaginez-vous en train de survoler la ville d’aujourd’hui – ses rues animées, ses monuments aux contours familiers – avec le pouvoir de l’« augmenter » virtuellement pour faire apparaître, en surbrillance, les bâtiments et les espaces publics prévus pour la ville de demain. C’est ce que proposent les maquettes 3D, des outils d’urbanismequi s’appuient sur les progrès fulgurants du numérique dans le domaine de la cartographie. Et qui, parfois, n’ont rien à envier auxmondes immersifs des meilleurs jeux vidéo.

« Le numérique transforme la manière de travailler des élus, et la manière de décider de l'aménagement », a expliqué Jean-Louis Missika, adjoint au maire de Paris chargé de l’innovation, de la recherche et des universités. Ces maquettes numériques, en particulier, contribuent à renouveler les pratiques des professionnels dans plusieurs directions : elles facilitent la mobilisation des experts,informent les habitants, et offrent même des occasions d’impliquerles citoyens dans le processus de décision.

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Oscar Niemeyer, Modernist Architect of Brasília

Oscar Niemeyer, Modernist Architect of Brasília | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Mr. Niemeyer, the Brazilian architect, created flowing designs that infused Modernism with a new sensuality and inspired generations of architects worldwide.

 


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New Dissertation: The city as interface. Digital media and the urban public sphere | Curating the Academic World of Collaborative Media

New Dissertation: The city as interface. Digital media and the urban public sphere | Curating the Academic World of Collaborative Media | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
New Dissertation: The city as interface. Digital media and the urban public sphere The main concern of this study is the future of the urban public sphere. It investigates various scenarios that... (RT @enablingcity: The city as interface.

Via Manu Fernandez, proto-e-co-logics
luiy's insight:

This may lead to two different (non-exclusive) scenarios that enforce a broader trend in which people sort themselves out geographically, that is: people are more and more keeping in touch with people who share a similar identity or particular goal. Citizens may use digital media as ‘filters’ that allows them to find the spaces where they are likely to meet people who are similar to them. Institutions may use these same technologies to target particular audiences and make places more attractive to them, or even to exclude access to those who do not belong.

A second scenario also builds upon a broader geographic trend that has been called ‘Living Together Apart.’ This is a development in which various urban publics live in and use the same geographic areas, but do not interact much. An example is found in the former working class turned migrant quarters near European inner cities that have become gentrified over the last decades. Local working class people, young professionals and migrants share the same neighborhood. A Turkish coffee house might be located next to a designer coffee bar. They are geographically close, but are separated by a large symbolic distance. The filtering mechanisms of mobile media could enforce this scenario. The chaotic experience of all those different worlds on top of each other becomes ‘navigable’ and ‘inhabitable’ through the use of urban media that help users locate those microvariations in space that are relevant to them.

That, however, is only one part of my findings. Urban media also have the affordance to create a public sphere in new ways. Urban media can create a new type of platform that can bring forth collective issues around which publics can organize. Data from various sensor networks can be mapped to, for instance, show the air quality or energy use of a city. These mappings can become a condensation point around which publics start to organize themselves. In addition, the use of urban media can be used to make individual contributions to such communal issues visible. This could mean that it becomes easier to turn resources into a ‘commons’, a communally used and managed resource. First examples of these are the bike and car sharing schemes that have sprung up in various cities around the world. There is a chance that the communal use and management of these practical collective issues could lead to the formation of publics around these issues that bring together people from various backgrounds. I have shown how ‘open data’ initiatives could perhaps play a similar role. These too could create new platforms on which urban publics can form.

At the same time I have also argued that the introduction of a new platform by itself is not enough for a public realm to come into being. To function as a public realm, platforms need a program that provide one or more functions that will attract citizens from various backgrounds. This is true for physical spaces as well as for urban media platforms. Studies have shown that digital platforms can enhance the sense of a local community or public in a particular neighborhood, but that this does not happen by itself.

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The Networked Urban Environment

The Networked Urban Environment | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Imagine never having to look for a parking space ever again. Imagine that from here on out, this problem is solved. Fast-forward to 2025.

 

Urban infrastructures are increasingly being equipped with sensors and other means of collecting information and channeling our everyday actions, from energy use to parking patterns, into software and networks that analyze data and act upon it. Cities--and communities-- are becoming “smarter” as “the internet of things” evolves. What this means is that more and more people and things, including parking spaces are becoming connected, allowing for better prediction models of traffic and energy usage thanks to real-time data flows, leading to better awareness of current resource statuses and more practical matters such as more dependable payment mechanisms.


Via ddrrnt, proto-e-co-logics
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