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L’avenir automobile : technologies et usages innovants

L’avenir automobile : technologies et usages innovants | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Les voitures électriques se rechargent sans fil, en Colombie-Britannique. Les chercheurs de l’UBC à Vancouver ont testé avec succès un système de charge magnétique : le véhicule s’accote à la station et la batterie se met alors en charge grâce à un engrenage magnétique, comme un aimant en entrainerait un autre ; une technique fonctionnant à faibles fréquences et à des champs électriques d'exposition négligeables. Seul inconvénient : quatre heures d’attente pour huit heures d’autonomie ; et les usagers détestent attendre…
C’est pourquoi la firme Better Place, en Israël, commence à équiper ses stations-services d’échangeurs instantanés de batteries : grâce à un bras robotisé, la batterie déchargée est démontée, retirée et remplacée par une neuve, le tout en moins de trente secondes. Une rapidité qui nécessite cependant de posséder TOUTES les batteries qui sont échangées, et que les usagers « louent » : un monopole difficile à partager…


Via Lockall
luiy's insight:

Ce système de transport est basé sur la collaboration entre voisins, communautés, gouvernements et gestionnaires routiers, pour que toute la planification des transports soit orchestrée à la seconde et soit calquée sur des objectifs sociaux.


Idéalement, lorsque vous désirez vous déplacer, vous branchez votre itinéraire sur le réseau qui vous présente toutes les options, selon votre degré d’urgence ou d’importance (travail ou plaisir). Le réseau vous donne les conditions d’embouteillage actuelles, les occasions de covoiturage immédiates, les stations de bus ou de métro accessibles, ainsi qu’une évaluation précise du temps de marche éventuelle.

 

Tous ces éléments existent déjà… séparément. Pour parvenir à un système de transport social intégré, il faudrait en tout premier lieu concevoir le « tableau de bord » de l’usager.

 

Des compagnies telles RideAmigosCORP y travaillent déjà, et mettent à disposition des entreprises et des usagers une solution Web,Century City TMO: Commute 90067, véritable planificateur de transport :

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Libelium Smart World Infographic: Sensors for Smart Cities, Internet of Things and beyond | Libelium

Libelium Smart World Infographic: Sensors for Smart Cities, Internet of Things and beyond | Libelium | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Libelium's market research document "50 Sensor Applications for a Smarter World," is captured here in an infographic comprising Smart Cities, Internet of Things (IoT) and other sensing applications. 


Via judycurtis
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judycurtis's curator insight, April 9, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a great cross-section of the different technologies and applications that make up Smart Cities, and other applications of the Internet of Things. Easy to read and understand. A picture is worth a thousand words...

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Smart cities: what urban life will be like in 2050

Smart cities: what urban life will be like in 2050 | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

If you work for a young web company, you probably think your office is pretty cool. Maybe it has a pool table or even a roof terrace. Pah! Give it 37 years and, according to engineering company Arup, our office blocks will contain working farms, produce their own energy, be linked together by suspended green walkways and sections of each floor will be removable, upgradable and replaceable. Intersting article on Smart Cities that looks into some of the key innovations by Shell and IBM. 


Via JWT_WOW
luiy's insight:

Indeed, the floors of Arup’s building occupied by algae-filled biofuel pods are not unlike a current project by French biochemist Pierre Calleja. He is building algae street lamps that eat up CO2 in the atmosphere. Combine this with another algae lamp that produces its own light using energy created by photosynthesis and you get self-powered, anti-pollution street lamps.

 

Researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) just announced their creation of a graphene supercapacitor — essentially a battery but one that charges up to 1,000 times faster than the normal kind, and that can be composted. The future promises instant phone chargers and petrol stations with plugs that can charge cars faster than they currently fill up on unleaded.

 

At last week’s TED conference in LA an architect and computer scientist Skylar Tibbets showed off 4D printing — essentially objects that self-assemble by absorbing water. For Tibbets this material is best used for installing underground water pipes.

 

Robinson is loath to point out the world’s smartest city (he mentions Birmingham as a candidate) but Newton says new cities in emerging markets have the potential to “leapfrog other parts of the world.” 

The real smart aspect may come down not to the technology which we know exists but to foresight and willingness to change.

“There have to be new models of collaboration for businesses and decision-makers in cities and government to have the positive impact we know the technology could support,” says Newton. The city that leads in this department may just end up the smartest in the class.

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Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, March 8, 2013 5:49 AM

Urbane Man… the creative class at work

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Agents, Models, and Geodesign | ArcNews

Agents, Models, and Geodesign | ArcNews | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Michael Batty explains how geodesign technology and agent-based modeling can help designers and stakeholders work together to agree on new plans for cities.
luiy's insight:

There are now many new methods for modeling cities that differ from the traditional approaches to simulating urban structure, land use, and transportation flows. As data has become richer and bigger and computers have become all-pervasive, with ever-increasing memories and ever-faster processing times, it has become possible to model the behaviors of individual objects that make up data aggregates, such as populations, that were the focus of simulation models a decade or more ago. Individuals that compose these populations can now be represented as distinct objects within computations, now usually being referred to as agents. Agents are essentially individual objects that have to be well-defined with strong identities and distinct from the environment in which they sit. These might be likened to the "atoms" that compose our cities, notwithstanding that what goes on inside the atom is hidden from our view. Although in cities agents are often considered to be human beings, it is quite possible to define them in terms of any distinct objects that compose a system. In particular, agents might be streets or buildings, components that make up the weather or vehicles on the highway, the bricks that a house is built from, or the pipes/wires that click together to keep our utilities functioning. Their definition is entirely dependent on the context, and in this sense, agent-based models or modeling (ABM) has emerged as a much more generic tool for simulation than most of the other approaches developed hitherto. Indeed, Esri has introduced a plug-in called Agent Analyst that enables users to build agent models that have a spatial component, which is the map in ArcGIS.

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12 Fresh Ideas for Transforming the Places We Live With Open Data

12 Fresh Ideas for Transforming the Places We Live With Open Data | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

A few of the 886 proposals from the Knight Foundation's latest open government news challenge.

 

This year, the Knight News Challenge has been soliciting project proposals to open and leverage government data anywhere at the national, state and local levels (in the U.S. and abroad). As of last week, 886 projects are vying for a share of the $5 million in funding, all in response to this question: "How can we make the places we live more awesome through data and technology?"

 

Amid all of the submissions are innovations we've already encountered at Atlantic Cities: a favorite guerrilla wayfinding campaign from Raleigh, North Carolina; Code for America's playful StreetMix web app; the San Francisco-based Urban Prototyping Festival; and a community-driven transportation planning project based on the kind of data analytics we wrote about here. But that's barely scratching the surface of all the proposals that Knight has corralled.

Visit the article link for a list of 12 ideas from the competition that are new and worth developing (with the applicants' description of their programs). On the 29th, Knight plans to announce a set of semifinalists, who will be invited to complete more detailed proposals. The final winners (there's no predetermined number of them) will then be announced in June...


Via Lauren Moss
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Lauren Moss's curator insight, April 1, 2013 4:06 PM

Innovative ideas on how to utilize open data and communication technology to enhance communities, engage citizens and empower local governments in a variety of ways...

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Innovation publique : la création d'un "Mindlab" français est à l'étude

Qu’est-ce que l’innovation publique ? L’innovation publique est une réponse au décalage observé entre les politiques publiques et le besoin réel des usagers. Ces politiques publiques sont en effet élaborées au plus haut niveau de l’Etat par des experts, sur des bases théoriques parfois très éloignées des réalités du terrain, et n’incluent pas suffisamment dans leur processus d’élaboration les premiers concernés : les administrations et leurs usagers.


L’innovation publique consiste donc à améliorer ces politiques, en les simplifiant et en incluant dans le processus les fonctionnaires des administrations concernées, les citoyens et les entreprises.


Via Lockall
luiy's insight:

 

Plusieurs pays se sont déjà dotés de leur laboratoire d’innovation publique, tel le Danemark et son MindLab, laboratoire interministériel qui constitue une référence en la matière. Parmi les sujets auxquels s’est déjà attelé le laboratoire danois, citons pour exemple :
- le système de déclaration d’impôts en ligne et son adaptation aux besoins des jeunes danois


- le type d’aide à apporter aux créateurs d’entreprises à fort potentiel (description du cas sur le site de la 27e Région)

 

En France, un travail similaire est réalisé au niveau des régions par la 27e Région , “do-thank” des politiques publiques. La vocation de ce do-thank ? Explorer de nouvelles façons d’améliorer la conception et la mise en oeuvre des politiques publiques. Des programmes de recherche-action sont ainsi élaborés avec les régions volontaires et mis en oeuvre par des équipes pluridisciplaines (sciences humaines, design de services, innovation sociale). L’objectif étant à terme d’aider les régions à créer leur propre fonction de recherche-action.

 

L’Etat français envisage sérieusement pour sa part de se doter, à l’instar du Danemark, de son propre laboratoire d’innovation publique. S’inscrivant dans le cadre de la modernisation de l’action publique, cette entité aurait pour mission de travailler sur l’amélioration (et la simplification) de politiques publiques existantes dans un souci d’efficacité, d’écoute des besoins des usagers et de réduction des coûts. La création de ce laboratoire devrait être proposée par la Ministre de la Réforme de l’Etat, Marylise Lebranchu, à l’automne 2013.

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ABoudières's comment, March 29, 2013 5:33 AM
Un article des Echos présentant le MindLab danois assez concis et intéressant : http://www.lesechos.fr/economie-politique/france/actu/0202576559088-l-exemple-danois-comme-source-d-inspiration-540268.php
Carole Maurage's curator insight, March 30, 2013 11:16 AM

A suivre de très près ! D'autres pays ont déjà bien avancé sur ce point.

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Open Smart Cities I: Open Internet of Things

Open Smart Cities I: Open Internet of Things | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

"Open Smart Cities I" post that address, from the point of view of open source software, several technological areas related to Smart Cities, as the Internet of Things, Cloud, Big Data, or Smart Cities platform of services and applications. In this post, we make a brief review of the concept of Smart City, and introduce the topic of Internet of Things, wherein we explore the potential of open source technologies (software, hardware and standar).


Via estratic
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This is what futurists in 1988 thought Los Angeles would look like today

This is what futurists in 1988 thought Los Angeles would look like today | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

In 1988 the Los Angeles Times Magazine published 'L.A. 2013: A Special Report.' Written by Nicole Yorkin, the article takes a look at what daily life might look like for a typical Angeleno in the year 2013 — then 25 years away. It's a fascinating read both for what it gets correct as well as where it misses the mark.


Via Luca Baptista, Kenneth Mikkelsen
luiy's insight:

One area that is missed almost completely, however, is the revolution of cloud-based computing and storage. Almost all of the futuristic devices described in the piece — from an automated home gym to school desks with computer screens built right in — rely on some sort of physical storage device. One of the lone examples that doesn't hew to this paradigm is video on demand. However, the real 2013 has many more options in this realm than what's portrayed here (the fictional family has only 10 movies to choose from on their VOD service, and ordering a film requires a phone call to their cable company).

 

Futurist Syd Mead, known for Blade Runner and an assortment of other works, lends conceptual artwork he did for an unproduced television show called LA 15. It reveals a downtown Los Angeles of futuristic, sweeping lines, and while the landscape hasn't transformed to the degree he envisioned, the aesthetic does sync up nicely with buildings like the current Walt Disney Concert Hall. It's a fascinating read for anyone interested in where we are, where we thought we'd be, and where we have yet to go.

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NYC as API - Reinvent Payphones - The Open Source City

NYC as API - Reinvent Payphones - The Open Source City | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
What if all the data and code created for the new payphone network in NYC were open? Control Group shares a vision of the future for all.

Via OpenDataSoft
luiy's insight:

I recently had the honor of being able to work with a team at Control Group to help put together our entry for the Reinvent NYC Payphones Competition.  Our concept is NYC I/O, and I’d like to share a few thoughts as to why our entry is different from the other excellent entries.

 

Many entries brought in sensors and digital signage, but in our design meetings what was always at the forefront for us was access. Anytime you’re implementing a city-scale program to put sensors, cameras, and smart-phone mac address detectors in, there are clearly going to be questions about big brother and surveillance, and I think these questions are valid. I don’t want to live in a city where this data is collected but only available to certain parties.

 

To that end, Control Group is proposing an Open API for the city itself. Not just a marketplace for apps to access this ubiquitous computing platform, but the ability for anyone to mine the data for patterns, to see what the police are seeing, to see how companies are making use of the data. This data comes from us, and we should own it. What Control Group wants to do is help build a system of hardware and software that will make the city like the Web itself: open and evolving, with its ultimate form unknown and unknowable.

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Comment notre "société des données" va reconfigurer la ville?

Comment notre "société des données" va reconfigurer la ville? | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

L’incidence des données et de leur explosion est en train de franchir un cap. Aux portes des villes, sur d’anciens sites industriels ou sur des bases logistiques désaffectées, de drôles de « boîtes » fleurissent, comme autant de témoignages physiques d’un basculement numérique en cours. Érigés au plus près de la demande et des points d’interconnexions, là où la croissance des besoins en matière de stockage et de gestion des données se fait la plus critique (mais aussi là où il est le plus logique et facile d’y répondre), les data centers, comprenez des « centres de traitement de données »,  ont à charge d’abriter et de faire tourner des milliers de serveurs d’entreprises, à la manière d’immenses pouponnières digitales.


Via Lockall
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Eli's curator insight, April 14, 5:32 AM

Future des Data Centers en France ; région parisienne

2012 : 136 DC 11Km⊃2; 220K serveurs

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25 Technologies Every Smart City Should Have - Mashable

25 Technologies Every Smart City Should Have - Mashable | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
25 Technologies Every Smart City Should Have
Mashable
You think cities are crowded now? By 2030, more than 5 billion people will live in urban settings. But before we get to that kind of population density, we have to optimize our cities.

Via ParadigmGallery
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:18 PM

There are some pretty innovative and creative ideas coming together for a smarter city of the future...."apps and well-implemented technology can help cash-strapped governments save money and, be more efficient"....check it out....

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El Sur de Europa y América Latina, unidos por el P2P | Código abierto

El Sur de Europa y América Latina, unidos por el P2P | Código abierto | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Un texto para presentar el Wikisprint de la P2P Foundation que se celebrará el próximo 20 de marzo en Iberoamérica, Italia y Grecia

Via Pierre Levy
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Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 20, 2013 1:41 PM

Aunque inicialmente el #wikisprint iba a desarrollarse apenas en España, aprovechando la visita de Michel Bauwens, fundador de la P2P Foundation, el intercambio de información y las conexiones humanas extendieron la convocatoria a toda la América hispánica. También se unió Brasil. Y Grecia e Italia. Redes, personas e instituciones, unidos por el P2P. Sin embargo, en el #wikisprint del próximo 20 de marzo, posiblemente uno de los mayores de la historia, va a haber mucho más que un mapeo. La inercia colaborativa ha generado una riquísima hoja de ruta. Durante el #Wikisprint habrá todo tipo de actividades. Debates, conferencias, proyecciones, self media, talleres, visualizaciones de redes, vídeos…

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Smart Communities for Smart Cities

Smart Communities for Smart Cities | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Many of us worry about the impact of technology on our lives, and with the explosion of social media and smart phones in recent years, these worries have become more acute. We worry that we are contactable 24/7, we worry about missing out on ‘real world’ relationships through reliance on virtual connections, we worry about over-surveillance, we worry about personal data security, and we worry that our children are spending too much time playing computer games.


Via Rob Kitchin
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The Vertical Farm: A Keystone Concept for the the Ecocity

Dr. Dickson Despommier was born in New Orleans in 1940, and grew up in California before moving to the New York area, where he now lives and works. He has a PhD in microbiology from the University of Notre Dame. For 27 years, he has conducted laboratory-based biomedical research at Columbia University with NIH-sponsored support. He is now an emeritus professor at Columbia University and adjunct professor at Fordham University.
At present, Dr. Despommier is engaged in a project with the mission to produce significant amounts of food crops in tall buildings situated in densely populated urban centers. This initiative has grown in acceptance over the last few years to the point of stimulating planners and developers around the world to incorporate them into their vision for the future city. To date, there are vertical farms up and running in Japan, Korea, Singapore, Seattle, and Chicago, with many more in the planning stage. It is his hope that vertical farming will become commonplace throughout the built environment on a global scale.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Smart cities of the future

Smart cities of the future | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Here we sketch the rudiments of what constitutes a smart city which we define as a city in which ICT is merged with traditional infrastructures, coordinated and integrated using new digital technologies. We first sketch our vision defining seven goals which concern: developing a new understanding of urban problems; effective and feasible ways to coordinate urban technologies; models and methods for using urban data across spatial and temporal scales; developing new technologies for communication and dissemination; developing new forms of urban governance and organisation; defining critical problems relating to cities, transport, and energy; and identifying risk, uncertainty, and hazards in the smart city. To this, we add six research challenges: to relate the infrastructure of smart cities to their operational functioning and planning through management, control and optimisation; to explore the notion of the city as a laboratory for innovation; to provide portfolios of urban simulation which inform future designs; to develop technologies that ensure equity, fairness and realise a better quality of city life; to develop technologies that ensure informed participation and create shared knowledge for democratic city governance; and to ensure greater and more effective mobility and access to opportunities for urban populations.

Smart cities of the future
M. Batty, K. W. Axhausen, F. Giannotti, A. Pozdnoukhov, A. Bazzani, M. Wachowicz, G. Ouzounis, Y. Portugali
The European Physical Journal Special Topics
November 2012, Volume 214, Issue 1, pp 481-518
http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjst/e2012-01703-3


Via Complexity Digest
luiy's insight:

We begin by defining the state of the art, explaining the science of smart cities. We define six scenarios based on new cities badging themselves as smart, older cities regenerating themselves as smart, the development of science parks, tech cities, and technopoles focused on high technologies, the development of urban services using contemporary ICT, the use of ICT to develop new urban intelligence functions, and the development of online and mobile forms of participation. Seven project areas are then proposed: Integrated Databases for the Smart City, Sensing, Networking and the Impact of New Social Media, Modelling Network Performance, Mobility and Travel Behaviour, Modelling Urban Land Use, Transport and Economic Interactions, Modelling Urban Transactional Activities in Labour and Housing Markets, Decision Support as Urban Intelligence, Participatory Governance and Planning Structures for the Smart City. Finally we anticipate the paradigm shifts that will occur in this research and define a series of key demonstrators which we believe are important to progressing a science of smart cities.

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L.A. Uses Big Data to Map Energy Block by Block | MIT Technology Review

L.A. Uses Big Data to Map Energy Block by Block | MIT Technology Review | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Interactive Data Visualization App Sheds Light on Energy Use and Inefficient Buildings.

Via Siarhei Mardovich
luiy's insight:

The University of California at Los Angeles today published a map that brings some clarity to how the city uses electricity, block by block.


For consumers, the interactive map shows how each block compares to others and consumption patterns by season. But the Web app is more directly aimed at the municipal utility, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), and city planners. The map overlays census and land use information so people can see how income levels affect electricity use and the difference between single family, multi-family, and commercial buildings. Privacy is protected by only showing data at the block level rather than individual buildings.


With the data, the utility could develop more finely tuned programs to improve efficiency, such as retrofits targeted at high energy users or low-income neighborhoods, says project manager Stephanie Pincetl, a professor at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. It could also shed light on how buildings of a certain age perform and be combined with other data sources, such as projections for high heat days from climate change, she added.


The application is a prime example of how data visualizations can bring some order to understanding building energy. In the U.S., about 40 percent of energy (not just electricity) is consumed in buildings. Some experts estimated that between 30 percent and 50 percent is wasted. Columbia University last year did a similar mapping project to shed some light on the dynamics of energy use and to inform policies and foster the exchange of ideas. 

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Why we should enable the autocatalytic city

Why we should enable the autocatalytic city | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

In this modern age, we think of cities as large institutions or machines. We talk about their failures as failures of management, coordination, governance. We think we could have "better" cities if we could only tune the machine to make it more "efficient." The machine model is implicit in the popular language around "smart cities." The promise is that shiny, smart boxes will figure out how to make our cities tick by smoothing traffic flow, monitoring crime and allocating power through smart grids.
We need to think again. Urban centers are evolving organisms, not engineering problems. Although we are able to control parts of a city -- central business districts, mass-transit systems, water distribution -- we will never hold and understand the whole. Cities are dynamic, complex-adaptive systems composed of millions of relatively free-willed individuals who each day make hundreds of individual decisions that set in motion consequences leading to a million other decisions.


Via Viktor Markowski, Complexity Digest
luiy's insight:

That call, though, rests on an unquestioned assumption about cities. In this modern age, we think of cities as large institutions or machines. We talk about their failures as failures of management, coordination, governance. We think we could have "better" cities if we could only tune the machine to make it more "efficient." The machine model is implicit in the popular language around "smart cities." The promise is that shiny, smart boxes will figure out how to make our cities tick by smoothing traffic flow, monitoring crime and allocating power through smart grids.

 

We need to think again. Urban centers are evolving organisms, not engineering problems. Although we are able to control parts of a city -- central business districts, mass-transit systems, water distribution -- we will never hold and understand the whole. Cities are dynamic, complex-adaptive systems composed of millions of relatively free-willed individuals who each day make hundreds of individual decisions that set in motion consequences leading to a million other decisions.....

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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 30, 2013 1:12 PM

Bottom-up growth, driven by citizens, trumps central command.

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City Protocol, nuevo protocolo para las Smart Cities |

City Protocol, nuevo protocolo para las Smart Cities | | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
La empresa GDF SUEZ, Cisco y el Ayuntamiento de Barcelona quieren impulsar la certificación City Protocol que podría ser usada por cualquier ciudad.

Via Toni Sánchez, xkortazar, Territori, Anna Melchor
luiy's insight:

El City Protocol, va un poco más allá, ya que se trata de un nuevo marco de trabajo abierto, para las ciudades de todo el mundo para evaluar y mejorar el esfuerzo en materia de sostenibilidad ambiental, la calidad de vida y servicios de la ciudad, innovando y aplicando nuevas formas de participación de la sociedad y mediante el aprovechamiento de las tecnologías de la comunicación (TIC).

 

City Protocol está desarrollado de la misma forma que se hizo en su momento con IP (Internet Protocol), se establece un protocolo que se base en la comunidad global, que englobe el desarrollo urbano de una forma integrada de todas las ciudades.

 

También se creará también una organización, City Protocol Society que representará empresas, centros de investigación y un gran conjunto de universidades que apoyan este proyecto y de distintas maneras participarán en el desarrollo de este protocolo de ciudades.

 

Como muestra de este compromiso, Barcelona ha puesto en marcha un Smart City Campus en la zona de renovación urbana del 22@, que será un espacio de innovación urbana que aglutinará empresas, instituciones, universidades y centros tecnológicos

 

El pasado mes de julio se celebró en Barcelona, el workshop sobre City Protocol, en el que colaboraron las ciudades de Amsterdam, Boston, Buenos Aires, Busan, Copenhagen, Derby, Dublin, Genova , Helsinki, Hyderabad, Istambul , Lima, Livorno, Lyon, Maputo, Medellín, Milan, Moscow, Nairobi, New York City, Nice, Paris, Quito, Rome, San Francisco, Seoul, Taipei, Torino, Uppsala, Venice, Vienna, Yokohama.

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Data Farming: Demonstrating the Benefits of Urban Agriculture [INFOGRAPHIC]

Data Farming: Demonstrating the Benefits of Urban Agriculture [INFOGRAPHIC] | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Design Trust put together a metrics framework that measured the associated activities of urban agriculture with the known benefits derived from various studies to convince city officials of urban farming's positive impact.


Transforming underutilized land into productive urban farms was one of the many topics which were presented at the recent Kansas City Design Week.  Jerome Chou, past Director of Programs at the Design Trust for Public Space, presented his unique experience with the implementation of the Five Boroughs Farm in New York City and the impact that urban agriculture can have on low-income areas of a city.

Chou pointed out that having the land available for an urban farm is only half of the battle. The other half involves changing local zoning laws, influencing political opinion, garnering economic support, and proving the project will have a net benefit to a community...


Via Lauren Moss
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Marcus Taylor's curator insight, August 4, 2013 3:40 AM

Urban Agriculture faces a myriad of challenges to enter the mainstream of urban development in the pursuit of "SmartCities" Worth a browse.

Daniel Moura's curator insight, January 23, 4:22 AM
Many cities (like NYC) are leaving old prejudices behind and are converting green areas and unused land to urban agriculture. Improving food security and resilience, reduce city's ecological footprint, supporting pollinators, increasing biodiversity and building sense of community are just a few examples of the benefits it provides
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Assemblage raygun

Assemblage raygun | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
The latest piece from mad assemblage sculptor Roger Wood is this delightful ray-gun: "Another mental health break from clocks with this Steampunk ray gun and charging stand."

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ArchéoSF: Michel Ragon, La Cité de l'An 2000

ArchéoSF: Michel Ragon, La Cité de l'An 2000 | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Michel Ragon est surtout connu pour son intérêt pour l'histoire sociale et la littérature prolétarienne mais il est aussi un critique d'architecture important. Quand à 50 ans il passe une thèse elle a pour titre La Pratique architecturale et ses idéologies.


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A visual and interactive experiment on the Parisian underground network

A visual and interactive experiment on the Parisian underground network | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Metropolitain.io attempts to invent new ways of interacting with maps of the Parisian underground system. Data visualization helps users better understand the area they live in, as well as its actual accessibility.
luiy's insight:

Metropolitain is a datavisualization  experiment by Dataveyes.

 

One of the most intricate and dense underground networks in Europe, the metro is a central component in the daily life of millions of Parisians. As a result, the official metro map conditions the very way commuters approach time, and space, as they tend to select their journeys based on the perceived smallest distance between two points.

 

This visualization offers to challenge this conventional view. Metropolitain takes on an unexpected gamble: using cold, abstract figures to take the pulse of a hectic and feverish metropolis. You are invited to play around with two views: the projected journey time between two stations, as well as the number of people touching in at each station. The metro map is no longer arbitrarily dictated by the spatial distance between two points, but transforms along the user exploration, to reflect its actual accessibility.

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Digitize or Die: Reinventing Big Cities - Mobiledia

Digitize or Die: Reinventing Big Cities - Mobiledia | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Mobiledia Digitize or Die: Reinventing Big Cities Mobiledia Mayors are taking a page from Silicon Valley, the pioneer that reinvented itself decades ago and now boasts more than 52,000 IT jobs -- or about four percent of the residents.


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Living Lab: Urban Planning Goes Digital in Spanish 'Smart City'

Living Lab: Urban Planning Goes Digital in Spanish 'Smart City' | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Cities around the world aim to become "smart cities," but in Santander, Spain, the goal has already become a reality. Thousands of sensors help alert residents to traffic jams, regulate the watering in city parks and dim the street lamps.

Via Peter Verschuere
luiy's insight:

Making Data Public

 

 

Next, Mayor de la Serna wants to air the city's secrets. Many types of information that were previously confidential or difficult to access will now be made public, including statistical data on demographic changes and real estate prices. Then the mayor wants to create a digital equivalent of a village square. The app "Ideas for All" -- something like Facebook but specifically for city residents -- will connect the city with its inhabitants. "We want to create a new, cooperative relationship between the people and the city government," de la Serna explains.

 

The mayor hopes this flood of data will inspire programmers to create more apps to make Santander even smarter. So far, there has been no resistance to the project. None of Muñoz's sensors have fallen prey to vandals. Taxi drivers initially feared the city wanted to use these sensors to carry out constant surveillance of the city, but that concern, de la Serna says, has long since given way to pride at being part of such a futuristic project, especially during a difficult economic period.

 

That pioneering spirit is apparently already paying off. The Spanish multinational company Ferrovial -- owner of, among other assets, London's Heathrow Airport -- has decided to invest in Santander and will build a smart city research center there.

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NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.

 

Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

 

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


Via Lauren Moss
luiy's insight:

THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

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James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:15 AM

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

david nguy's curator insight, October 21, 2014 5:53 PM

Sous la ville, de nouvelles technologies et innovations se mettent en place afin de faciliter la diffusion de l'information.