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The cities and communities ....the present and the future - urban change.NET -
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VersuS: the real-time lives of cites | human-centered #SmartCities | #urbanism

VersuS: the real-time lives of cites | human-centered #SmartCities | #urbanism | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
VersuS explores the real-time lives of cities using data captured from major social networks and analyzing it through natural language analysis and artificial intelligence
luiy's insight:

Cities have become ubiquitous publishing spaces in which people constantly use nomadic technological tools (such as smartphones, tablets, laptops and network-connected devices and services) to communicate, learn, understand their environment, express emotions, collaborate, organize themselves, work, express opinions.

 

In VersuS we focus on the concept of the concept of human-centered smart cities.

 

The VersuS project:

 

- all the real-time public information which is generated in cities on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Instagram, Foursquare and Flickr is captured 

 

- Natural Language Analysis and Artificial intelligence are used to understand the topics people are discussing, their emotional approach (sentiment analysis and emotional analysis) and, when available, their exact geographic location 

 

- we currently support 29 languages 

 

- network analysis is then performed to understand the human geographies/topograpies of cities: who are the hubs, the influencers, the switches, the major nodes of the human network, and the dynamics according to how information, knowledge, opinions and data spread in the city

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5 Examples of Sustainable Roof Design Strategies

5 Examples of Sustainable Roof Design Strategies | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

As we move further into the early years of the 21st century, there is a growing consciousness of the need to create more sustainable systems to maintain our society.

 

Natural resources have for too long been exploited and utilized with little regard for posterity. Our cities and towns require large amounts of outside support, but there are many minds coming together to develop new plans and techniques to revitalize our civilization and reduce our environmental impact. One of the major trends leading this movement is to create change from the top down, and make our rooftops pull their weight ecologically and economically.


Via Lauren Moss
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Thiet Ke Noi That's comment, May 29, 2013 4:38 AM
http://noithatmodern.com/tin-tuc-&-su-kien/nhung-mau-noi-that-phong-bep-dep-nhat/724.html
ESTAR's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:58 PM

Los números no mienten, la temperatura del aire puede bajar con techos verdes

Orsolya Serfőző's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:22 AM

Agree

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


Via Lauren Moss
luiy's insight:
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
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Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.