The urban.NET
4.0K views | +0 today
Follow
The urban.NET
The cities and communities ....the present and the future - urban change.NET -
Curated by luiy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by luiy from Politique des algorithmes
Scoop.it!

Des #algorithmes pour l’inimaginable : interview avec Michael Hansmeyer | #architecture

Des #algorithmes pour l’inimaginable : interview avec Michael Hansmeyer | #architecture | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

Via Dominique Cardon
luiy's insight:

Michael Hansmeyer est un architecte post-moderniste qui utilise les techniques algorithmiques appliquées à l’architecture, explore l’art génératif et le logiciel CAO pour mener à bien des projets complexes de construction. Titulaire d’un MBA obtenu à l’INSEAD, et d’un Masters en Architecture (MA) de l’Université de Columbia, il travaille actuellement au sein du Groupe CAAD au département architecture d’ETH, à Zürich. Bien connu pour son Subdivided Columns – A New Order (2010): des colonnes symétriques d’une grande complexité, créées par des prototypes fabriqués à partir d’outils en acier utilisés pour façonner une façade en plastique ABS, vouée à être exposée en extérieur et à être porteuse. Son dernier projet, Digital Grotesque (2013), utilise des algorithmes pour créer des formes qui apparaissent tant synthétiques qu’organiques. AMA a eu la chance de rencontrer Michael Hansmeyer, l’architecte nous présentant sa vision de l’architecture contemporaine.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by luiy from The Programmable City
Scoop.it!

Against the #SmartCity | #algorithms

Against the #SmartCity | #algorithms | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Adam Greenfield critiques the prevailing definition of the "smart city" and calls for an alternative vision that understands and responds to the messy realities of human existence.

Via Rob Kitchin
luiy's insight:

— Arrived at algorithmically: Assume, for the sake of argument, that there could be such a solution, a master formula capable of resolving all resource-allocation conflicts and balancing the needs of all a city’s competing constituencies. It certainly would be convenient if this golden mean could be determined automatically and consistently, via the application of a set procedure — in a word, algorithmically.

 

In urban planning, the idea that certain kinds of challenges are susceptible to algorithmic resolution has a long pedigree. It’s already present in the Corbusian doctrine that the ideal and correct ratio of spatial provisioning in a city can be calculated from nothing more than an enumeration of the population, it underpins the complex composite indices of Jay Forrester’s 1969 Urban Dynamics[8], and it lay at the heart of the RAND Corporation’s (eventually disastrous) intervention in the management of 1970s New York City.[9] No doubt part of the idea’s appeal to smart-city advocates, too, is the familial resemblance such an algorithm would bear to the formulae by which commercial real-estate developers calculate air rights, the land area that must be reserved for parking in a community of a given size, and so on.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by luiy
Scoop.it!

The #Algorithmic City | #smartcities #opendata

The #Algorithmic City | #smartcities #opendata | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
:snips - We Scale Cities
luiy's insight:

What else can we predict? In theory, any event that is not random, provided we have enough data to model the context. Examples include passenger load in public transports, availability of parking spots, traffic jams, waste production, energy consumption and revenues of a shop in a specific street. These all share a common underlying principle: use context rather than history to predict behavior.

 

In themselves, each of these predictions could lead to amazing new products and services. The real power though comes from integrating everything together and modeling an entire city and its interactions with people. For instance, if you can predict where people will need to go tomorrow, then you can create optimal bus routes, minimizing time to destination and walking distance, taking into account predicted traffic, weather and garbage collection schedules. In this ideal system, all services would be optimal and available to citizens at anytime. We call this new way of designing cities "Algorithmic Urbanism".

more...
No comment yet.