Branding & Consumers' emotional reponses
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Branding Strategy Insider | Brand Strategy And The Lovemarks Theory

Branding Strategy Insider | Brand Strategy And The Lovemarks Theory | Branding & Consumers' emotional reponses | Scoop.it

Lovemarks theory is based on a simple premise: human beings are powered by emotion, not by reason.

 

This is the essence of the Lovemarks argument. If you want people to take action—whether for something momentous, like voting for a president, or seemingly mundane, like buying one brand of facial tissues over another—you need to appeal to their emotions.

 

Neurologist Donald Calne perhaps said it best: “The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions.”

 

How can we create the kind of appeal that makes people feel inspired or laugh or cry? First, we must realize that brands don’t just get it by asking. They start by giving love, demonstrating that they love the people who buy them. The sea change comes when brands stop thinking about their customers as “them” and start thinking about “us.” When marketers make this change, they start rewarding their customers every day with brand experiences that have special resonance in three key areas: mystery, sensuality, and intimacy.

 

Of all the potential aspects of emotional resonance, perhaps none is more important than the sense of mystery that comes from great storytelling. Annette Simmons, an expert in storytelling, puts it precisely: “When you tell a story that touches me, you give me the gift of human attention—the kind that connects me to you, that touches my heart and makes me feel more alive.”

Yangyu Wang's insight:

I found this article very useful and valuable. It has an in-depth explanation of the emotional bonding with brands based on the Lovemarks theory.

 

Annette Simmons’s point of view has made a lot of sense “When you tell a story that touches me, you give me the gift of human attention—the kind that connects me to you, that touches my heart and makes me feel more alive.” Though there are many external influences on consumer behavior, such as culture difference, social positions, ethic groups, norms, values and believes, it doesn’t change the nature of love of human beings no matter which cultural backgrounds you have. As discussed in the article, stories have huge value in business, especially in brand management area. It brings branding onto a new level by creating a culture, character, personality and sensuality. It inspires their consumer think “What does this brand smell like, taste like, look like, sound like, and feel like?” 

 

People create allegiances to brands because they form sets of emotional expectations and preferences about brands. Brands can’t stop at a commodity level, “when consumers feel a sense of love for a brand they have a higher sense of brand loyalty, spread positive word-of mouth, and resist negative information about that brand” (Batra, Ahuvia, & Bagozzi, 2011)

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Levi Norton's comment, August 21, 2013 8:22 PM
Responding to Elizabeth's article, Great find of relation to the importance of emotional responses I fully agree about attracting consumers through emotion as Elizabeth said the role of emotions can play in building resonance and connection between consumers and brands. In my point of view I get engaged to brands that have emotionally attached me e.g. same personality as me. I enjoyed reading this post nice work Elizabeth
Liz Reid's curator insight, August 22, 2013 2:36 AM

The Lovemarks theory is an interesting concept in relation to brand management and how brands communicate with consumers. Brands can attempt to appeal to consumer's emotions and elicit emotional responses, which in turn can lead to action, for example, purchasing a product. Brands with Lovemarks have a great deal of loyalty, inspire consumers and reward their consumers with experiences. I think the Lovemarks theory is extremely applicable to the brand created by the All Blacks. People feel a great deal of emotion and loyalty when they think about the All Blacks and this is perpetuated by the various communications that the All Blacks put forth. Emotional responses are exercised by the buying of merchandise and attending games. It is interesting to discuss brands and their communication with audiences in terms of the Lovemarks theory. Which brands elicit these responses and which do not? Are the brands that do stir up emotion more successful in the marketplace? 

Logan Harris's comment, August 22, 2013 6:43 PM
I find the concept of Lovemarks (not to be confused with hickies!) really intriguing. Creating a brand that consumers both love and respect takes a lot of effort and surely must utilise the integration of many different channels of communication. For me to love a brand I have to love everything about it - from the values it holds as a company, to the tone it uses in its communications, right down to the design and packaging of the product itself. Encouraging the 'love' of a brand goes beyond increasing the sales of the product to one consumer. Each customer that comes to love your product becomes an ambassador for it, recommending it to others above and beyond other brands. While I personally buy plenty of things I need to fulfil a need on a commodity basis, I actively look forward to making my next purchase of a brand I love!
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The Emotional-Value Funnel | Branding Magazine

The Emotional-Value Funnel | Branding Magazine | Branding & Consumers' emotional reponses | Scoop.it

Discovering your emotional-value is a fundamental ingredient to building a successful business.Your brand, by very definition, is the pathway to discovering and building real emotional-value.

 

Why? Because brands define the relationship between you and your customers. People create allegiances and loyalty to brands because they form sets of emotional expectations and preferences about brands. Brands don’t and can’t compete at a commodity level… although often they act like they do. Instead, brands compete for emotional-value.

 

Not all emotional-value is the same. There are varying depths to your relationships with your customers and each has it’s own emotional-value attached to it. Although there are myriad of ways to look at it, it’s best to unpack the concept of emotional-value in a progressive, developing based funnel. I call this the “Emotional-Value Funnel.”


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
Yangyu Wang's insight:

The article has introduced us a framework called “Emotional-Value Funnel”, which made a very depth analyses of the relationship between marketers and consumers. And indicated how important role of consumer’s emotion plays in the brand management industry.

 

It seems to me that as a marketer, when you want to make somebody buy something, the most efficient way is emotional bonding with your customers and forming a long-term relationship with them. Because Donald Calne used to say that the essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions. To successfully gain emotional contact with customers, The IMC tools can be used to make contacts with customers, strengthen bonds, deliver the branding message and build customer relationships in the process of “affiliation → validation → identity.” 

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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 14, 2013 9:13 AM

A thoughtful and useful framework for understanding the role of #emotion in successful #branding.