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Getting People to Believe in Something They Can’t Yet Imagine

Getting People to Believe in Something They Can’t Yet Imagine | The Twinkie Awards | Scoop.it
What would you do if you had a working prototype of a revolutionary tablet computer that was receiving rave reviews well before Apple came out with its iPad? Cancel further funding for the project in favor of developing an updated version of an existing company product? In hindsight that seems crazy, but it’s exactly what Microsoft did with its prototype “Courier” tablet.

Similar fates often befall innovations within large companies. It is not enough to come up with next great idea. To turn that idea into a reality you have to influence people and gain their support. You must do that in the face of vast forces arrayed against innovation within an established organization, which include inertia, resistance to change, fear of failure, financial disincentives, and the tendency of people and organizations to favor what has worked in the past. Then there’s what might be the biggest hurdle of all, people’s inability to envision something that is truly different.

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 12, 2014 4:10 PM

Leaders can, and often do, try to make corporate cultures more receptive to innovation.

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Nine Common Leadership Errors, And How To Avoid Them

Nine Common Leadership Errors, And How To Avoid Them | The Twinkie Awards | Scoop.it

“Great leaders embrace the learning they get from mistakes (both their own and others’),” Laurence Weinzimmer, a professor of management at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., and business development specialist Jim McConoughey write in The Wisdom of Failure.

 

They note that when studying great leadership, we usually focus on the strategies and attributes of the leaders, but often that is only half the story. Being a great leader is not only about making the right decisions but also about actively avoiding the wrong decisions. They point to Ken Lay, founder of Enron, who made many brilliant decisions but was toppled by the wrong decisions he failed to avoid.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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