The translation s...
Follow
Find
3.0K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
onto The translation studies portal
Scoop.it!

The war in Algeria (Evergreen target book)

The war in Algeria (Evergreen target book) | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Bible Access Breakthrough: YouVersion Bible App Tops 1,000 Translations

Bible Access Breakthrough: YouVersion Bible App Tops 1,000 Translations | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it

Edmond, Oklahoma - In another major milestone, the wildly popular and free YouVersion Bible App has expanded to more than 1,000 translations of the Bible in over 700 languages.

“It’s unprecedented in history having so many Bible versions in the palm of your hand something we never imagined was possible even a few years ago,” said Bobby Gruenewald, the app’s creator and Innovation Pastor of LifeChurch.tv in Oklahoma. “This milestone wouldn’t be possible if not for the Bible translators and the more than 150 publishers, Bible societies, and organizations that have collaborated with YouVersion.”

So which version clocked in as the Bible App’s 1000th? It’s the Deftera Lfida Dzratawi, the first digital translation of the New Testament into Hdi, a language spoken predominantly in the West African nation of Cameroon.

Since 1987, Wycliffe Bible translators have collaborated with Cameroonians to learn and analyze the dialect as they composed the first Hdi (pronounced huh-DEE) edition of the Bible, published and distributed in print in 2013.

“To see this labor of love now go digital with YouVersion is incredible as we see the potential to reach the nearly 45,000 Hdi speakers in Cameroon and nearby Nigeria,” said Bob Creson, President and CEO of Wycliffe USA, who also thanked project partners SIL International and the Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy.

Often there are divinely inspired moments of discovery when translating the Bible into a language, particularly for the first time. Such was the case with Hdi, revolving around the verb “dvu,” meaning in essence to love unconditionally. For centuries, this word was known to Hdi speakers, but rarely used. Instead “dva” was used far more often. For example, a man would dva his wife, but his love was conditional based on how useful and faithful she was.

When local Cameroon community leaders, who were part of the Hdi translation committee, realized that dvu best expressed God’s love for them and the kind of love he wanted people to mirror in their lives, it opened their eyes to an entirely new way of experiencing their faith.

“God had encoded the story of His unconditional love right into their language. Properly translated and understood, God’s Word has incredible power to change lives and communities. It can transform the way people relate to God and others, including women, providing an entirely new world view,” added Creson.

Downloaded on over 150 million devices, the Bible App now reaches 87 percent of the Christians worldwide who have Internet access, offering more written languages than any other app on the planet. The app offers Bible translations embraced by Catholics, Evangelicals, Protestants, Russian Orthodox, and even Messianic Jews along with countless other denominations.

What languages have the most downloads of the Bible App to date? Find out in this special infographic created for the 1,000 Bible versions milestone.

"We are thrilled to play our part, sourcing the Bible translations that make this landmark reach of Scripture engagement possible," said Gary Nelson, chairman of Every Tribe Every Nation, a YouVersion partner that has been instrumental in contributing to the milestone. "It's a tremendous picture of what is possible as great teams and technology come together, committed to a day when no one on planet earth would live beyond hope of God's Word.”

We’ve come a long way since the first handwritten English-translation of the Bible was published in 1380. “Technology in recent years has dramatically reduced the time it takes to produce a first-language translation from decades to a few years. Within two weeks of completion, in the villages we serve people can access the text on their cell phones. What a blessing!” said Lois Gourley of SIL International, a Christian nonprofit dedicated to studying, developing, and documenting languages, especially lesser-known ones.

What are some of the lesser-known languages on the Bible App? Find out here.

Despite the impressive milestone of more than 1,000 versions in over 700 languages, YouVersion and its partners have plenty of work ahead. With 6,901 distinct languages in the world, thousands are still waiting for translation to begin or to be completed.

Available for Apple, Android and virtually every mobile device, download the Bible App atbible.com/app.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Edmond, Oklahoma - In another major milestone, the wildly popular and free YouVersion Bible App has expanded to more than 1,000 translations of the Bible in over 700 languages.

“It’s unprecedented in history having so many Bible versions in the palm of your hand something we never imagined was possible even a few years ago,” said Bobby Gruenewald, the app’s creator and Innovation Pastor of LifeChurch.tv in Oklahoma. “This milestone wouldn’t be possible if not for the Bible translators and the more than 150 publishers, Bible societies, and organizations that have collaborated with YouVersion.”

So which version clocked in as the Bible App’s 1000th? It’s the Deftera Lfida Dzratawi, the first digital translation of the New Testament into Hdi, a language spoken predominantly in the West African nation of Cameroon.

Since 1987, Wycliffe Bible translators have collaborated with Cameroonians to learn and analyze the dialect as they composed the first Hdi (pronounced huh-DEE) edition of the Bible, published and distributed in print in 2013.

“To see this labor of love now go digital with YouVersion is incredible as we see the potential to reach the nearly 45,000 Hdi speakers in Cameroon and nearby Nigeria,” said Bob Creson, President and CEO of Wycliffe USA, who also thanked project partners SIL International and the Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy.

Often there are divinely inspired moments of discovery when translating the Bible into a language, particularly for the first time. Such was the case with Hdi, revolving around the verb “dvu,” meaning in essence to love unconditionally. For centuries, this word was known to Hdi speakers, but rarely used. Instead “dva” was used far more often. For example, a man would dva his wife, but his love was conditional based on how useful and faithful she was.

When local Cameroon community leaders, who were part of the Hdi translation committee, realized that dvu best expressed God’s love for them and the kind of love he wanted people to mirror in their lives, it opened their eyes to an entirely new way of experiencing their faith.

“God had encoded the story of His unconditional love right into their language. Properly translated and understood, God’s Word has incredible power to change lives and communities. It can transform the way people relate to God and others, including women, providing an entirely new world view,” added Creson.

Downloaded on over 150 million devices, the Bible App now reaches 87 percent of the Christians worldwide who have Internet access, offering more written languages than any other app on the planet. The app offers Bible translations embraced by Catholics, Evangelicals, Protestants, Russian Orthodox, and even Messianic Jews along with countless other denominations.

What languages have the most downloads of the Bible App to date? Find out in this special infographic created for the 1,000 Bible versions milestone.

"We are thrilled to play our part, sourcing the Bible translations that make this landmark reach of Scripture engagement possible," said Gary Nelson, chairman of Every Tribe Every Nation, a YouVersion partner that has been instrumental in contributing to the milestone. "It's a tremendous picture of what is possible as great teams and technology come together, committed to a day when no one on planet earth would live beyond hope of God's Word.”

We’ve come a long way since the first handwritten English-translation of the Bible was published in 1380. “Technology in recent years has dramatically reduced the time it takes to produce a first-language translation from decades to a few years. Within two weeks of completion, in the villages we serve people can access the text on their cell phones. What a blessing!” said Lois Gourley of SIL International, a Christian nonprofit dedicated to studying, developing, and documenting languages, especially lesser-known ones.

What are some of the lesser-known languages on the Bible App? Find out here.

Despite the impressive milestone of more than 1,000 versions in over 700 languages, YouVersion and its partners have plenty of work ahead. With 6,901 distinct languages in the world, thousands are still waiting for translation to begin or to be completed.

Available for Apple, Android and virtually every mobile device, download the Bible App atbible.com/app.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Leningrad - «C'est la merde, c'est comme ça»

Leningrad - «C'est la merde, c'est comme ça» | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it

Russie, 2003 : les revenus du pétrole et du gaz ont été de nouveau nationalisés et renflouent le budget de l'État, profitant au passage à la population. La Sainte-Mère-Russie se relève enfin de ses genoux. « Mais qu'est-ce qui pourrait aller mal ? » Aujourd'hui, on a comme un début de réponse.

***

On a de tout, à première vue
Et même de la fourrure au cul.
Mais quand même, rien ne va,
Et va comprendre c'est quoi...

C'est la merde, c'est comme ça (x4)

À première vue, tout est impec',
Et l'OTAN, on s'en bat les steaks.
Mais quand je suis bourré,
Dans mes rêves, l'Urss apparaît...

C'est la merde, c'est comme ça (x4)

À première vue, on manque de rien
Et on a même du pain.
Mais quand même, rien ne va,
Et va comprendre c'est quoi...

C'est la merde, c'est comme ça (ad lib)


Titre original : «Вот такая хуйня (СССР)»
Album «Для миллионов» (2003)

***

Pour la petite histoire, c'est le premier morceau dont la traduction a commencé à me tourner dans la tête, il y a quelques années. À l'origine, je traduisais en me basant sur la version studio, dans laquelle les 2e et 3e couplets sont mélangés par rapport à la traduction ci-dessus. La première version de la traduction de ce morceau ressemblait à :

À première vue on manque de rien,
Et on a même du pain,
Mais quand je vide une bouteille,
Je vois l'Urss dans mon sommeil...

Tout est nickel, quand on y pense,
Et l'OTAN, on s'en balance.
Mais quand même, rien ne va
Et va comprendre c'est quoi

Je me suis dit que l'OTAN et l'Urss, ça irait bien ensemble, et j'avais mélangé les deux couplets dans la traduction que j'avais partagé ensuite avec des amis. Et, peu de temps après, je me suis aperçu que dans ses concerts, le groupe avait lui aussi mélangé les deux couplets de la même manière.

Enfin, si j'ai mis tellement de temps à publier cette traduction, c'est que je ne serai jamais satisfait du refrain. L'expression est, comme souvent chez Leningrad, d'une banale et désarmante vulgarité, tout en restant assez riche de sens et emblématique : «vot takaïa khouïnia». La khouïnia – mot formé à partir de huï, «bite» – peut désigner à la fois un objet inconnu, une situation désagréable ou un obstacle mineur. La phrase complète est généralement utilisée aux sens de «voilà le topo», «voilà le bin's».

Charles Tiayon's insight:

Russie, 2003 : les revenus du pétrole et du gaz ont été de nouveau nationalisés et renflouent le budget de l'État, profitant au passage à la population. La Sainte-Mère-Russie se relève enfin de ses genoux. « Mais qu'est-ce qui pourrait aller mal ? » Aujourd'hui, on a comme un début de réponse.

***

On a de tout, à première vue
Et même de la fourrure au cul.
Mais quand même, rien ne va,
Et va comprendre c'est quoi...

C'est la merde, c'est comme ça (x4)

À première vue, tout est impec',
Et l'OTAN, on s'en bat les steaks.
Mais quand je suis bourré,
Dans mes rêves, l'Urss apparaît...

C'est la merde, c'est comme ça (x4)

À première vue, on manque de rien
Et on a même du pain.
Mais quand même, rien ne va,
Et va comprendre c'est quoi...

C'est la merde, c'est comme ça (ad lib)


Titre original : «Вот такая хуйня (СССР)»
Album «Для миллионов» (2003)

***

Pour la petite histoire, c'est le premier morceau dont la traduction a commencé à me tourner dans la tête, il y a quelques années. À l'origine, je traduisais en me basant sur la version studio, dans laquelle les 2e et 3e couplets sont mélangés par rapport à la traduction ci-dessus. La première version de la traduction de ce morceau ressemblait à :

À première vue on manque de rien,
Et on a même du pain,
Mais quand je vide une bouteille,
Je vois l'Urss dans mon sommeil...

Tout est nickel, quand on y pense,
Et l'OTAN, on s'en balance.
Mais quand même, rien ne va
Et va comprendre c'est quoi

Je me suis dit que l'OTAN et l'Urss, ça irait bien ensemble, et j'avais mélangé les deux couplets dans la traduction que j'avais partagé ensuite avec des amis. Et, peu de temps après, je me suis aperçu que dans ses concerts, le groupe avait lui aussi mélangé les deux couplets de la même manière.

Enfin, si j'ai mis tellement de temps à publier cette traduction, c'est que je ne serai jamais satisfait du refrain. L'expression est, comme souvent chez Leningrad, d'une banale et désarmante vulgarité, tout en restant assez riche de sens et emblématique : «vot takaïa khouïnia». La khouïnia – mot formé à partir de huï, «bite» – peut désigner à la fois un objet inconnu, une situation désagréable ou un obstacle mineur. La phrase complète est généralement utilisée aux sens de «voilà le topo», «voilà le bin's».

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Does Discovery broadcast fakery about indigenous peoples as well as sharks?

Does Discovery broadcast fakery about indigenous peoples as well as sharks? | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
David Hill: Film series about the Matsigenkas in Peru accused of “staging” scenes and story-lines
Charles Tiayon's insight:

George Monbiot’s articles for the Guardian about Discovery Channelpossibly faking an image of a giant shark, among other things, reminded me of the scandal several years ago when a TV crew was accused of bringing a fatal epidemic to indigenous people in Peru’s Amazon. The crew, from the London-based, now defunct Cicada Productions, was scouting for a location to shoot a film series for Discovery, according to its requests to enter Manu National Park and a radiogram from the head of a Matsigenka community inside the park, Yomibato, to the park director. Previous series had been called “World’s Lost Tribes” – an inaccurate, arguably offensive title – with one about the Kombais in West Papua shown on Discovery in 2007, and another, about the Meks in West Papua, shown on Discovery in 2008.

After arriving in Yomibato, in a remote part of Manu, the Cicada crew was disappointed at how “Westernized” the Matsigenkas were, according to anthropologist Glenn Shepard. In an interview in Anthropology NewsShepard – who was in Yomibato at the same time and is one of the world’s leading experts on Matsigenka society and culture – said:

[They] said they had come to scout filming opportunities for a sequel to Mark Anstice and Oliver Steeds’s reality seriesLiving with the Kombai. [One of Cicada’s crew] was disappointed by the Western trappings in the community of Yomibato. “The shorts, the guys playing soccer, the school house – that just won’t cut it with Mark and Ollie,” he said. He had heard of other communities further upriver where people wear traditional clothes and don’t speak Spanish, and was planning to travel there the next day.

According to a report by Cicada and Matsigenkas later interviewed by Shepard and indigenous organization FENAMAD, the crew travelled further upriver to visit even more remote Matsigenkas. Both Shepard and FENAMAD claimed that this decision was taken despite Cicada’s permit from the park authorities allowing them to travel no further than Yomibato and specifically prohibiting them from making contact with such people, who have very little contact with “outsiders” and therefore are extremely vulnerable to disease transmission. The permit read:

At the request of CICADA PRODUC

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Assemblée nationale : Les débats traduits dans 6 langues à partir de novembre

Les langues nationales seront plus présentes à l’Assemblée nationale à partir de novembre prochain. L’Institution parlementaire a recruté 21 interprètes de conférence qui vont traduire les travaux dans 6 langues nationales.

21 interprètes de conférence vont traduire les débats à l’Assemblée nationale à partir du mois de novembre dans 6 langues nationales. L’annonce a été faite, avant-hier, à Dakar par le président de cette institution, Moustapha Niasse. «Sur les 23 langues nationales codifiées, nous en avons sélectionnées six : le Pulaar, le Soninké, le mandingue, le sérère, le diola et le wolof. Ces langues seront maintenant utilisées à l’Assemblée nationale », a déclaré le président de l’Assemblée nationale lors de la visite qu’il a effectuée à l’Ecole supérieure de management touristique et de langues appliquées (Estel) qui abrite la session de formation des jeunes interprètes.

Les 21 interprètes ont été sélectionnés après un appel à candidature. Selon le président de l’Assemblée nationale, ils vont faire un stage de 9 mois sur l’interprétation simultanée quelle que soit la langue qui sera utilisée pour exprimer des idées au Parlement. « Après six mois de formation, les interprètes sont opérationnels. Ils vont travailler à l’Assemblée nationale comme interprètes de conférence faisant partie du personnel permanent de l’Assemblée nationale », a souligné le président de l’institution parlementaire. Le recrutement et la formation des jeunes interprètes sont le fruit d’un partenariat entre l’Assemblée nationale et l’Union européenne. « Les 2/3 du projet ont été financés par l’Union européenne, le 1/3 par l’Assemblée nationale », a précisé Moustapha Niasse qui ajoute que le projet permet aux jeunes sénégalais d’accéder à un emploi de qualité. Ces jeunes pourront aussi servir au Conseil économique social et environnemental (Cese) et au ministère des Affaires étrangères.

Moustapha Niasse a rappelé que c’est le président Macky Sall, alors président de l’Assemblée nationale qui avait enclenché le processus pour la traduction simultanée des débats dans les langues nationales. « L’Afrique ne se développera qu’à partir de ses langues nationales. Au Sénégal, on doit apprendre l’algèbre, la géométrie et l’histoire, dans nos langues nationales. Cela n’exclut pas  l’usage de la langue française. Toutes les théories, quelque soit la spécialisation concernée, doivent être maîtrisées par la jeunesse sénégalaise dans nos langues nationales », a dit M. Niasse.

Babacar DIONE







Charles Tiayon's insight:

Les langues nationales seront plus présentes à l’Assemblée nationale à partir de novembre prochain. L’Institution parlementaire a recruté 21 interprètes de conférence qui vont traduire les travaux dans 6 langues nationales.

21 interprètes de conférence vont traduire les débats à l’Assemblée nationale à partir du mois de novembre dans 6 langues nationales. L’annonce a été faite, avant-hier, à Dakar par le président de cette institution, Moustapha Niasse. «Sur les 23 langues nationales codifiées, nous en avons sélectionnées six : le Pulaar, le Soninké, le mandingue, le sérère, le diola et le wolof. Ces langues seront maintenant utilisées à l’Assemblée nationale », a déclaré le président de l’Assemblée nationale lors de la visite qu’il a effectuée à l’Ecole supérieure de management touristique et de langues appliquées (Estel) qui abrite la session de formation des jeunes interprètes.

Les 21 interprètes ont été sélectionnés après un appel à candidature. Selon le président de l’Assemblée nationale, ils vont faire un stage de 9 mois sur l’interprétation simultanée quelle que soit la langue qui sera utilisée pour exprimer des idées au Parlement. « Après six mois de formation, les interprètes sont opérationnels. Ils vont travailler à l’Assemblée nationale comme interprètes de conférence faisant partie du personnel permanent de l’Assemblée nationale », a souligné le président de l’institution parlementaire. Le recrutement et la formation des jeunes interprètes sont le fruit d’un partenariat entre l’Assemblée nationale et l’Union européenne. « Les 2/3 du projet ont été financés par l’Union européenne, le 1/3 par l’Assemblée nationale », a précisé Moustapha Niasse qui ajoute que le projet permet aux jeunes sénégalais d’accéder à un emploi de qualité. Ces jeunes pourront aussi servir au Conseil économique social et environnemental (Cese) et au ministère des Affaires étrangères.

Moustapha Niasse a rappelé que c’est le président Macky Sall, alors président de l’Assemblée nationale qui avait enclenché le processus pour la traduction simultanée des débats dans les langues nationales. « L’Afrique ne se développera qu’à partir de ses langues nationales. Au Sénégal, on doit apprendre l’algèbre, la géométrie et l’histoire, dans nos langues nationales. Cela n’exclut pas  l’usage de la langue française. Toutes les théories, quelque soit la spécialisation concernée, doivent être maîtrisées par la jeunesse sénégalaise dans nos langues nationales », a dit M. Niasse.

Babacar DIONE







more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Penny for your thoughts: Smartphones hampering kids' human emotion reading skills

Penny for your thoughts: Smartphones hampering kids' human emotion reading skills | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Edición, traducción y redes sociales en el 'Mediodía Poético' | CORDÓPOLIS, el Diario Digital de Córdoba

Edición, traducción y redes sociales en el 'Mediodía Poético' | CORDÓPOLIS, el Diario Digital de Córdoba | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
El festival Cosmopoética acoge este foro de debates, que concluirá cada día con una distendida tertulia entre público y ponentes
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Mediodía poético es el nombre del ciclo de jornadas de trabajo que acogerá el festival internacional Cosmopoética del 2 al 4 de octubre, según ha informado el teniente alcalde de Cultura del Ayuntamiento de Córdoba, Juan Miguel Moreno Calderón. Tres sesiones que, en formato de mesa de debate abierta, tratarán otros tantos temas que giran alrededor del mundo de la poesía: la edición, la traducción y la poesía en las redes sociales. Cada jornada finalizará con una tertulia entre público y ponentes, ya de forma más distendida, alrededor de una copa de vino.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Substantive Editing or Copyediting? What Do You Need? | LYNNETTE LABELLE

Substantive Editing or Copyediting? What Do You Need?
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Whether you decide to self-publish or traditionally publish, it would be a good idea to have your manuscript professionally edited. What if you can’t afford to have a substantive/big picture edit AND a copy edit? Which service should you choose?


The quick answer is that you should have a substantive edit done because it’s always about the story. If you have a clean manuscript with a weak plot or flat characters, agents and readers won’t like it. If you have a stellar story but some grammar or spelling issues, agents and readers will often overlook them (to a certain extent).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Nuevo diccionario histórico del español

Nuevo diccionario histórico del español | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Fiel a este mandato, el Nuevo diccionario histórico del español (NDHE), proyecto vinculado al Instituto de Investigación Rafael Lapesa, pretende presentar de modo organizado la evolución del léxico español a lo largo del tiempo. Su director es el académico José Antonio Pascual.
El objetivo fundamental del NDHE consiste en ofrecer a los filólogos, y al público en general, aquella información relevante sobre la historia de las palabras que les permita interpretar los textos del pasado. Para ello se dará cuenta de la evolución de los significados de las palabras e incluso de los usos lingüísticos accidentales de una época determinada. Para cumplir este fin básico, el NDHE se basará en los métodos …
Charles Tiayon's insight:

El objetivo fundamental del NDHE consiste en ofrecer a los filólogos, y al público en general, aquella información relevante sobre la historia de las palabras que les permita interpretar los textos del pasado. Para ello se dará cuenta de la evolución de los significados de las palabras e incluso de los usos lingüísticos accidentales de una época determinada. Para cumplir este fin básico, el NDHE se basará en los métodos de la lingüística, la filología y la informática. El hecho de que esta obra se conciba como un diccionario electrónico permite presentar la evolución de las unidades léxicas teniendo en cuenta las relaciones (genéticas, morfológicas, semánticas, etc.) que estas mantienen entre sí, de forma que se sitúe la evolución de las palabras dentro de la red de conexiones establecidas entre ellas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

New scheme launched to improve mathematics, language skills

New scheme launched to improve mathematics, language skills | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Govt also vows to plug the infrastructure gaps in all schools by utilizing portions of corporate social responsibility funds
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Agéndame | I Congreso de Traducción e Interpretación Especializada

Agéndame | I Congreso de Traducción e Interpretación Especializada | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Este 27 y 28 de setiembre se realizará, por primera vez en el Perú, el I Congreso de Traducción e Interpretación Especializada, como una iniciativa de la
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Este 27 y 28 de setiembre se realizará, por primera vez en el Perú, el I Congreso de Traducción e Interpretación Especializada, como una iniciativa de la Universidad César Vallejo para promover el desarrollo y la especialización de los profesionales en idiomas. El evento reunirá a los ocho mejores expositores en el mundo en Traducción Audiovisual, Técnico-Científica, Minera, Jurídica e Interpretación de Conferencia, entre otros.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Ogunfowoke: 21st Century Nigerian Radio: A source or a loss?

Ogunfowoke: 21st Century Nigerian Radio: A source or a loss? | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it

THERE is a radio in almost every home in Nigeria. In fact, nine in 10 Nigerians (92.6%) have radio in their homes, according to the 2012 BBG/Gallup survey on Nigeria Media Use. The portability of this medium has made it a very much sought-after source of information, education and entertainment among Nigerians.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

THERE is a radio in almost every home in Nigeria. In fact, nine in 10 Nigerians (92.6%) have radio in their homes, according to the 2012 BBG/Gallup survey on Nigeria Media Use. The portability of this medium has made it a very much sought-after source of information, education and entertainment among Nigerians.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Julio Cortázar traductor de profesión - El Intransigente

Julio Cortázar traductor de profesión - El Intransigente | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
El propio Cortázar se consideraba a sí mismo «un traductor metido a escritor»
Charles Tiayon's insight:

El propio Cortázar se consideraba a sí mismo «un traductor metido a escritor». "Pienso también que lo que me ayudó fue el aprendizaje, muy temprano, de lenguas extranjeras y el hecho de que la traducción, desde un comienzo, me fascinó. Si yo no fuera un escritor, sería un traductor", respondía Julio Cortázar, en Conversaciones con Cortázar, de Ernesto González Bermejo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Skype : la traduction en temps réel s'appuiera sur les réseaux sociaux

Skype : la traduction en temps réel s'appuiera sur les réseaux sociaux | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
En mai dernier, lors de la Code Conference, Microsoft dévoilait un plugin de traduction en temps réel pour son service Skype. Ce dernier dispose d'un algorithme s'appuyant sur les réseaux communautaires. [...]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Autres domaines - Langues (cours, traduction, accueil,...) - Quetigny (21800) - Jobaviz

Autres domaines - Langues (cours, traduction, accueil,...) - Quetigny (21800) - Jobaviz | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Consultez l'offre de job etudiant Autres domaines - Langues (cours, traduction, accueil,...) - Quetigny (21800) - Jobaviz, la Centrale du Job Etudiant
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Export. La traduction, une « compétence stratégique » | Ouest France Entreprises

Export. La traduction, une « compétence stratégique » | Ouest France Entreprises | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it

« La mentalité évolue, mais les entreprises françaises n'ont généralement pas conscience de la compétence stratégique de la traduction. Souvent dernière roue du carrosse, elle devrait être une étape de la chaîne d'export. » Patrick Bernardin a fondé Atlantique Traduction en 1979. Spécialisée dans le naval, l'entreprise compte aujourd'hui 3 500 clients, « des PME du tissu régional et des gros clients » : STXDCNS,WirquinMaisons du monde, le Crédit municipal, etc.

Technique et spécialisé

Le métier consiste à traduire des manuels techniques, des sites Internet, mais aussi des textes juridiques. « On travaille beaucoup avec les cabinets d'avocats. Avec la mondialisation, il y a de plus en plus de litiges à l'étranger ou avec des entreprises étrangères. » Surtout dans des domaines spécialisés. « L'un de nos traducteurs est un ancien avocat, un autre a été officier de marine pendant vingt ans. »

Pas uniquement en anglais

« L'erreur est de penser que tout le monde comprend l'anglais. » Notamment au-delà d'un certain niveau de documentation. Pour la fabrication par exemple, où « le message technique doit être compris de tous », la traduction est indispensable. Vietnamien, coréen, lituanien, allemand... l'entreprise, qui compte 400 traducteurs indépendants, travaille également « de plus en plus » en russe, portugais, néerlandais et en arabe.

Révolution numérique

La recherche de terminologie se fait sur Internet. « C'est au traducteur de décider si la traduction convient ou non. » Un logiciel d'assistance de traduction permet de « gérer la répétitivité des termes », stockés dans une base de mémoire. Aujourd'hui, la traduction automatique, instantanée, arrive. « C'est déjà le cas aux États-Unis. Mais on attend des garanties sur la confidentialité des bases de mémoire », s'inquiète l'ancien président de la Cnet, la Chambre nationale des entreprises de traduction.

Selon Patrick Bernardin, la post-édition, qui relie la traduction automatique, va fortement se développer, de même que la gestion de projet. « D'ici cinq ans, il restera toujours des traducteurs techniciens, mais beaucoup moins qu'aujourd'hui. »

LIRE AUSSI: + Notre dossier International connecting day 2014
Charles Tiayon's insight:

« La mentalité évolue, mais les entreprises françaises n'ont généralement pas conscience de la compétence stratégique de la traduction. Souvent dernière roue du carrosse, elle devrait être une étape de la chaîne d'export. » Patrick Bernardin a fondé Atlantique Traduction en 1979. Spécialisée dans le naval, l'entreprise compte aujourd'hui 3 500 clients, « des PME du tissu régional et des gros clients » : STXDCNS,WirquinMaisons du monde, le Crédit municipal, etc.

Technique et spécialisé

Le métier consiste à traduire des manuels techniques, des sites Internet, mais aussi des textes juridiques. « On travaille beaucoup avec les cabinets d'avocats. Avec la mondialisation, il y a de plus en plus de litiges à l'étranger ou avec des entreprises étrangères. » Surtout dans des domaines spécialisés. « L'un de nos traducteurs est un ancien avocat, un autre a été officier de marine pendant vingt ans. »

Pas uniquement en anglais

« L'erreur est de penser que tout le monde comprend l'anglais. » Notamment au-delà d'un certain niveau de documentation. Pour la fabrication par exemple, où « le message technique doit être compris de tous », la traduction est indispensable. Vietnamien, coréen, lituanien, allemand... l'entreprise, qui compte 400 traducteurs indépendants, travaille également « de plus en plus » en russe, portugais, néerlandais et en arabe.

Révolution numérique

La recherche de terminologie se fait sur Internet. « C'est au traducteur de décider si la traduction convient ou non. » Un logiciel d'assistance de traduction permet de « gérer la répétitivité des termes », stockés dans une base de mémoire. Aujourd'hui, la traduction automatique, instantanée, arrive. « C'est déjà le cas aux États-Unis. Mais on attend des garanties sur la confidentialité des bases de mémoire », s'inquiète l'ancien président de la Cnet, la Chambre nationale des entreprises de traduction.

Selon Patrick Bernardin, la post-édition, qui relie la traduction automatique, va fortement se développer, de même que la gestion de projet. « D'ici cinq ans, il restera toujours des traducteurs techniciens, mais beaucoup moins qu'aujourd'hui. »

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Why won’t English speakers read books in translation?

Why won’t English speakers read books in translation? | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Literature from other languages makes up just two or three per cent of English publishers’ output – why is the figure so low? Hephzibah Anderson investigates.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Some call it the two per cent problem, others the three per cent problem. It depends on which set of statistics you use and, as with most statistics, there’s ample room to quibble. But what they all point to is this: English-language publishers have a lamentable track record when it comes to translating great stories from elsewhere in the world.

Surely enough, in the recent flurry of ‘autumn highlight’ lists issued on both side of the Atlantic, scarcely more than one or two titles in translation made the cut. Haruki Murakami’s forthcoming tale of a loner spurned by his friends, Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, snagged a spot on plenty, and Publishers Weekly gamely flagged The Three-Body Problem, a futuristic escapade by China’s top sci-fi writer, Cixin Liu. But the other new books crowding the limelight at this frenetic point in the publishing calendar were almost uniformly by English-language authors: Hilary Mantel, Ian McEwan, Peter Carey, Colm Tóibín, Martin Amis, Margaret Atwood, Sarah Waters, Richard Ford…

Literature – fiction especially – offers a crucial window into the lives of others, promoting empathy and understanding in a way that travelling somewhere rarely does. By not translating more widely, publishers are denying us greater exposure to one of reading’s most vital functions. Compare that Anglophone two or three per cent to figures in France, where 27% of books published are in translation. And if that sounds a lot, you might care to know that in Spain it’s 28%, Turkey 40%, and Slovenia a whopping 70%.

Of course, those writers colonising the autumn book lists are united by something else besides language: their excellence. And let’s not forget that though they write in English, they hail from the US, Canada and Ireland as well as England. Moreover, their ranks might easily have been swelled by the likes of India (Salman Rushdie), South Africa (JM Coetzee) and Nigeria (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie). With so many countries in which English is either the first language or a robust second, all of them boasting highly evolved literary cultures, publishers in London and New York are already spoilt for choice. Why would they go looking to territories that present the bothersome burden of translation?

‘Tower of Babel’

Adam Freudenheim, publisher of Pushkin Press, agrees that there are justifiable reasons why English-language publishers publish less in translation than their overseas colleagues, but insists that the balance is still out of kilter. At Pushkin, which he took over 2012, he’s been trying to change that. While other publishers take on the occasional book in translation, hoping for a hit in the vein of the Stieg Larsson trilogy or Jonas Jonasson’s The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared, 90% of Pushkin’s titles were originally written in languages ranging from Arabic and Icelandic to Hebrew and Greek.

Their London office is a mini Tower of Babel, with German, French, Italian and Russian all spoken fluently. This means that not only are Freudenheim’s staff reading books that originate in those languages, they’re also reading works translated into French from Japanese, say, or reading Hungarian novels in German. It’s a great boon to their scouting operation and most publishers, he acknowledges, do not have such expertise to draw on.

Equally impressive is the range of titles that Pushkin publish, covering books for younger readers aged eight to 12, as well as classics and contemporary fiction. Among literary editors and even publishers, Freudenheim believes, literature in translation has become associated with rather serious books. It’s easy to see why – just think of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s epic six-volume autobiographical novel series, My Struggle, or some of the recently anointed Nobel Laureates. If the author’s foreign, it can be tempting to assume their work is either literary with a capital L or else about murder in the fjords.

It is only plucky independent presses that are looking anew at foreign-language literature. Amazon, so maligned in literary circles of late, launched a lively translation imprint of its own back in October 2010. Since then, AmazonCrossing has published 129 full-length titles, translated into English from 14 languages including Brazilian Portuguese and Chinese. Earlier this summer Gabi Kreslehner, the Austrian author of the crime thriller Rain Girl, even found herself at the top of the Kindle bestseller list.

As Freudenheim notes, readers don’t see books in translation as being any different from English-language titles. Sarah Jane Gunter, publisher of AmazonCrossing, agrees. “Customers love good stories,” she says.

Independent spirits

In the UK, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize (full disclosure: I was a judge a few years ago) has been boosting books in translation for well over 20 years, and if there was ever any lingering resistance to it, blockbusters like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo along with TV hits like The Killing have certainly helped wear it down. Professor Edwin Gentzler, director of theTranslation Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, sees ample reason for optimism regarding the health of translation in English-speaking countries, despite those damning stats.

English-language publishers bring out so many books between them that three per cent is a hefty number – far heftier than Slovenia’s 70%, he says. Moreover, the statistics often overlook small independent presses likeDalkey Archive and Open Letter, as well as specialists like Mage, an American press that publishes translations exclusively from Persian. And then there are the numerous small journals – literary, underground and regional journals that publish poetry, short stories, and excerpts in translation. Chutzpah, Banipal, Absinthe – just hearing their names can be a little intoxicating. Further cause for optimism, Gentzler says, comes from the university press publishing scene (up to 30%of the Massachusetts Review’s list, for instance, is in translation) and the internet. To offer just one example, Words Without Borders has translated more than 1,000 pieces into English from over 80 languages.

Meanwhile, some foreign-language authors have already begun writing in English. China’s Ha Jin is one such, and his upcoming novel, A Map of Betrayal, did in fact appear in the Huffington Post’s ‘best of’ survey of the coming months. Another author who would surely have been included in those lists were he ready to release a new novel is Orhan Pamuk, who writes in Turkish but has been accused of writing for translation. Murakami, it should be noted, writes in Japanese but is so enamoured of quintessentially American authors that he has himself translated Raymond Carver into Japanese.

In an increasingly global world, such cultural cross-pollination is not only inevitable, it can be thrilling too. Yet we must also take care to preserve the variety and pungent authenticity that local fiction encapsulates. After all, if it weren’t for literature in translation, we English-language readers wouldn’t know what it is to converse with The Little Prince, to be transformed like Gregor Samsa, or to immerse ourselves in the magic realism of One Hundred Years of Solitude. Even the Bible, it should be remembered, is a book in translation.

If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Culture, head over to our Facebook page or message us onTwitter.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Hosting an ARTIS Event - Call for proposals for ARTIS collaboration in research training

Hosting an ARTIS Event - Call for proposals for ARTIS collaboration in research training | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Call for proposals for ARTIS collaboration in research training ARTIS, or Advancing Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies, is a new research training initiative in the broad area of tran...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Reminder: Deadline for proposals to host an ARTIS event on research training (see below) is 15 September 2014.

Call for proposals for ARTIS collaboration in research training

The ARTIS (Advancing Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies) initiative offers training designed to help researchers in the field to improve their research skills and methods, to set up and manage research projects effectively, and to negotiate and apply theoretical models.

Building on the long and successful history of the Translation Research Summer School (run by the University of Manchester, University College London and the University of Edinburgh), ARTIS has been conceived as a flexible platform to collaborate with institutions worldwide in the delivery of short, research intensive training in a variety of places, responding to local needs.

Institutions interested in hosting an ARTIS event are now invited to apply by 15 September 2014.

Full information on the application process, application assessment criteria (including the application form) and deadlines for subsequent application rounds is available at:

http://artisinitiative.org/events-2/hosting-an-artis-event/

Queries can be sent to:

artisinfo@artisinitiative.org

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Translator Project Manager (Trados) Job with Bluetownonline Ltd | 3558170

Translator Project Manager (Trados) Job with Bluetownonline Ltd | 3558170 | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Job Title: Project Manager (Translation)Location: SheffieldSalary: £18k - £20k pa.The company are a well-established and well regarded company that has grown steadily over the last 15 years. The company now require a confident, experienced P
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Language and numeracy skills 'too low' among Blaenau Gwent pupils

Language and numeracy skills 'too low' among Blaenau Gwent pupils | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Trevor Guy, the interim director of education, warns that skills are not high enough from the moment children start nursery
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

The Language Center of Hamad bin Khalifa University’s Translation and Interpreting Institute introduces Mandarin and English courses -

The Language Center of Hamad bin Khalifa University’s Translation and Interpreting Institute introduces Mandarin and English courses - | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
The Translation and Interpreting Institute (TII) of Hamad bin Khalifa University (HBKU), a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science, and Community Development (QF), is proud to offer members of the Qatar’s community expert language training in Mandarin and English. TII’s Language Center already offers language courses in Arabic, French, and Spanish, and is now …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Access to Technology for Immigrant Students

Access to Technology for Immigrant Students | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
How a ninth-grade teacher handles BYOD issues with a largely immigrant classroom.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

At Washington Technology Magnet School  in St. Paul Minnesota, many students are recent immigrants from Burma, Bhutan, and East African countries like Somalia and Ethiopia. There’s also a sizable Hmong population. The school’s diverse student population represents a shift experienced in schools across the country towards more immigrant children and English Language Learners.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Freelance Project Editor | Media jobs

Freelance Project Editor | Media jobs | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Freelance Project Editor required for book project.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

B2B publishing company Futurelex is seeking a freelance project editor to undertake a book project. The successful candidate must have experience of B2B publishing and be able to demonstrate strong organisational, editing and production skills. S/he must be able to oversee a project from beginning to end. Duties include: Co-ordinating the submission of materials, copy-editing chapters, creating page layouts and experience of Quark/InDesign, Photoshop and Word. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Google apologizes for search glitch: ‘Oops!’

Google apologizes for search glitch: ‘Oops!’ | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Some Google searches on Tuesday turned up repeating images of what appeared to be a car crash in Russia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Welsh language website Lleol.net makes switch to domain name for Wales

Welsh language website Lleol.net makes switch to domain name for Wales | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
Lleol.net also planning digital tour of Wales
Charles Tiayon's insight:

As part of the launch of the new .cymru and .wales domain names, this month we’re announcing a whole host of organisations, public bodies and businesses that will be making the switch as members of our Founders Programme.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Tiayon
Scoop.it!

Getting the Most from your Google Search

Getting the Most from your Google Search | The translation studies portal | Scoop.it
The 2012 Ross-Blakley Law Library student survey revealed that 57% of the student body at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law begins their research by conducting a Google search. Truthfully, I a...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

The Google Advanced Search template allows you to use syntax tools to craft a better question with Boolean operators and provides filters (such as date and language) to narrow the search results. It also gives you the ability to limit your search to a single type of document, such as a PDF file or PowerPoint presentation, by utilizing the “file type” drop-down menu.

more...
No comment yet.