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U.S. Students Are Not Lagging Behind International Peers

U.S. Students Are Not Lagging Behind International Peers | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Socioeconomic inequality among U.S. students skews international comparisons of test scores, finds a new report released today by the Stanford Graduate School of Education and the Economic Policy Institute. When differences in countries’ social class compositions are adequately taken into account, the performance of U.S. students in relation to students in other countries improves markedly." | via Get Schooled

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Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying

Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Getting enough sleep is an under-valued but crucial part of learning. Contrary to students’ belief that staying up all night to cram for an exam will lead to higher scores, truth is, the need for a good night’s rest is even more important than finishing homework or studying for a test. A recent study in the journal Child Development showed that sacrificing sleep in order to study will actually backfire. The study followed 535 Los Angeles high school students for 14 days, tracking how long they slept, as well as how well they understood material being taught in class and how they performed on a test, quiz, or homework. 'Although the researchers expected that extra hours of studying that ate into sleep time might create problems in terms of students’ understanding of what they were taught in class, they were surprised to find that diminishing sleep in order to study was actually associated with doing more poorly on a test, quiz, or homework,' Science Daily wrote. 'Reduced sleep … accounts for the increase in academic problems that occurs after days of increased studying,' said UCLA scientist Andrew Fuligni. 'Although these nights of extra studying may seem necessary, they can come at a cost.' | by Katrina Schwartz

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McStudy Spots's curator insight, October 16, 11:16 PM

Maximizing study time is one thing having good study spaces is good for. It can also be good for maximizing sleep time, since less time studying can mean more time sleeping. This article examines why sleep is important to learning, based upon a two week study on 535 Los Angeles high school students. They discovered that staying up to cram often resulted in reduced test scores, whereas getting sufficient sleep led to better understanding of the material being learned. Therefore, your sleep spaces are just as important as your study spaces, so think about both of them equally critically to maximize your learning ability.


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Smart Robots Will Take Over A Third Of Jobs By 2025

Smart Robots Will Take Over A Third Of Jobs By 2025 | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"At its Symposium/ITxpo conference in Orlando, Florida, the technology research firm’s forecast pointed toward a future of not only automated physical work, but cognitive tasks as well. 'Gartner predicts one in three jobs will be converted to software, robots and smart machines by 2025,' said Gartner research director Peter Sondergaard. 'New digital businesses require less labor; machines will make sense of data faster than humans can.' In February, PBS NewsHour’s Making Sense talked to authors Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee of 'The Second Machine Age' about what was different with this new wave of technological advancement: 'We are at an inflection point. The first big inflection point in human history was about 200 years ago, when the steam engine started the industrial revolution,' Brynjolfsson said. 'That was a period that saw a whole set of new machines come along that could automate muscle power, physical work. In recent years, we are seeing a wave of technologies that can augment, automate all sorts of cognitive tasks and we think, ultimately, those will have as big, or an even bigger effect on humanity as the first industrial revolution.'” | by Joshua Barajas

 

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Why Charters Cause Fiscal Havoc in Local Districts

Why Charters Cause Fiscal Havoc in Local Districts | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Charter proponents such as the Thomas Fordham Institute and others often cite rhetoric about charters being less expensive. The facts presented in this report suggest something quite different.  The reality is that total costs to a community for the same total number of students rises, quite substantially, when charter schools open. When charter proponents try to argue that charter schools cost less, they are using very selective figures concerning where the costs lie. This report will take you step-by-step through the impact of charter schools on the fiscal health of a school system." | by Noel Hammatt

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The Plot Against Public Education

The Plot Against Public Education | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

Bill Gates had an idea. He was passionate about it, absolutely sure he had a winner. His idea? America’s high schools were too big. When a multibillionaire gets an idea, just about everybody leans in to listen. And when that idea has to do with matters of important public policy and the billionaire is willing to back it up with hard cash, public officials tend to reach for the money with one hand and their marching orders with the other. Gates backed his small-schools initiative with enormous amounts of cash. So, without a great deal of thought, one school district after another signed on to the notion that large public high schools should be broken up and new, smaller schools should be created. That was Bill Gates’s grand idea. From 2000 to 2009, he spent $2 billion and disrupted 8 percent of the nation’s public high schools before acknowledging that his experiment was a flop. The size of a high school proved to have little or no effect on the achievement of its students. At the same time, fewer students made it more difficult to field athletic teams. Extracurricular activities withered. And the number of electives offered dwindled. Gates said it himself in the fall of 2008, 'Simply breaking up existing schools into smaller units often did not generate the gains we were hoping for.' There was very little media coverage of this experiment gone terribly wrong." | by Bob Herbert

 



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Widespread Standardized Test Cheating in 39 States

Widespread Standardized Test Cheating in 39 States | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"According to the National Center for Fair & Open Testing (FairTest), it’s time to prepare to be shocked. The organization has recently compiled data indicating that the scandal in Atlanta is 'just the tip of the iceberg.' when it comes to cheating on standardized tests in our nation’s schools. Specifically, FairTest has found documented cases of cheating, and in some cases, systematic manipulation of scores, in 39 states and the District of Columbia, over the last five years alone. The organization has also identified more than 60 methods administrators and teachers have used to alter student scores on these tests, from urging low-scorers to be absent the day of the test, to shouting out and otherwise indicating correct answers during testing." | by Elizabeth Hines

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Sobering Lessons: Shadow Your Students For The Day

Sobering Lessons: Shadow Your Students For The Day | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building. Because her experience is so vivid and sobering I have kept her identity anonymous. But nothing she describes is any different than my own experience in sitting in HS classes for long periods of time. And this report of course accords fully with the results of our student surveys. 'I have made a terrible mistake.I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day. It was so eye-opening that I wish I could go back to every class of students I ever had right now and change a minimum of ten things – the layout, the lesson plan, the checks for understanding.'" | via Grant Wiggins 


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This Is Your Brain On Money: Why The Wealthy Think Differently

This Is Your Brain On Money: Why The Wealthy Think Differently | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Nobody's perfect. But only the rich get away with thinking that their luck and their flaws are actually strengths. Paul Piff and his co-authors, who have done extended research on the behaviors of the wealthy, find that lower class individuals are more generous, charitable, trusting and helpful than upper class individuals. Further, in laboratory experiments, wealthy participants were more likely to take valued goods, cheat, lie and endorse such behavior. This effect is reinforced further by the 'just-world' bias, which leads us to believe that the rich and powerful deserve their positions. In a famous study, Melvin Lerner found that when students were informed that another student had randomly won a prize, they attributed positive characteristics to the student who had won. Studies have also shown that people attribute negative characteristics to victims — from Kent State students shot by the National Guard, to young black men shot by police, to low-wage workers. A more recent study by Justus Heuer, Christoph Merkle and Martin Weber finds rather the same thing: Investors are fooled into believing risk-taking is based in skill, rather than chance. Like the students in the experiment, investors believe managers who are simply reaping returns from risky bets are, in fact, oracles. Another study by Arvid Hoffmann and Thomas Post finds that 'the higher the returns in a previous period are, the more investors agree with a statement claiming that their recent performance accurately reflects their investment skills (and vice versa).' Research by Charles O’Reilly and others finds that narcissistic CEOs are better paid than other CEOs. Another study finds that employees that spend more time grooming make more than workers who do not. (The effect is particularly strong for men of color.) All of this should leave us skeptical of the idea, promoted by many free-market fundamentalists, that compensation is set by objective market factors. As Christopher Lasch notes, 'Nothing succeeds like the appearance of success.' | by Sean McElwee

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States Spend More On Prisoners Than On Students

States Spend More On Prisoners Than On Students | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

Perhaps if states spent more money on educating students, they would not have to spend so much money keeping prisoners incarcerated. New maps compiled by research engine FindTheBest show how much states spend on funding their average K-12 pupil, compared to what the average prisoner costs for state taxpayers. FindTheBest used research compiled in 2012 from the Vera Institute of Justice, which analyzed the full cost of prisons to taxypayers in 40 states, and 2010 - 2011 information from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), which used federal, local and state data to glean its results." | by Rebecca Klein

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Cancer Type May Be Linked With Socio-Economic Status

Cancer Type May Be Linked With Socio-Economic Status | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Cancer can strike anyone, no matter your education or income level. But according to a new study, there may be an association between type of cancer and socioeconomic status. The findings, published in the journal CANCER, show that certain types of cancers seem to be more common among people living in high-poverty areas, compared with those living in low-poverty areas (and vice versa). The study is based on nearly 3 million tumors that were diagnosed in people living in 16 different states and Los Angeles, between 2005 and 2009. When looking broadly at all the different kinds of cancer, there was barely any association between poverty level and new cancers. But when looking specifically at different cancer types, 32 of 39 types were strongly associated with poverty, whether positively or negatively. In addition, socioeconomic status seems linked with incidence of cancer, as well as likelihood of dying from said cancer. 'The cancers more associated with poverty have lower incidence and higher mortality, and those associated with wealth have higher incidence and lower mortality,' study researcher Francis Boscoe, Ph.D., of the New York State Cancer Registry, said in a statement. 'When it comes to cancer, the poor are more likely to die of the disease while the affluent are more likely to die with the disease.'" | by Amanda Chan

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A Babysitter Would Get Paid More Than Most Teachers

A Babysitter Would Get Paid More Than Most Teachers | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Have you heard this one: Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year!  It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do -- babysit!  Let's check the math on that...." | via Daily Kos

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Venture Capitalists Poised To ‘Disrupt’ Public Education

Venture Capitalists Poised To ‘Disrupt’ Public Education | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Next year, the market size of K-12 education is projected to be $788.7 billion. And currently, much of that money is spent in the public sector. “It’s really the last honeypot for Wall Street,” says Donald Cohen, the executive director of In the Public Interest, a think tank that tracks the privatization of roads, prisons, schools and other parts of the economy. That might be changing soon as barriers to investment are rapidly fading. As Eric Hippeau, a partner with Lerer Ventures, the venture capital firm behind viral entertainment company BuzzFeed and several education start-ups, has argued, despite the opposition of 'unions, public school bureaucracies, and parents, the education market is ripe for disruption.'  The explosion of investor interest in education raises a number of questions, among them: What kind of influence will the for-profit education sector attempt to exert over education policy? And if school reform is crafted to maximize the potential for investor profit, will students benefit, as boosters claim—or will they suffer?" | by Lee Fang

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Common Core Meant To Bring Public Education 'To Scale'

Common Core Meant To Bring Public Education 'To Scale' | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"At the American Enterprise Institute in March 2014, billionaire Bill Gates explained why the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are necessary above and beyond individual state standards that might be better: 'You get more free market competition. Scale is good for free market competition.Individual state regulatory capture is not good for competition.'  In economics, 'scale' involves decreasing costs as a result of the ability to mass produce. Gates sees 'scale potential' in the national standardization of public education– i.e., CCSS. He believes such is 'good for free market competition.'  Not true. The national standardization of public education does not promote economic health for small (local) businesses. Instead, it feeds monopolies– like bloated, incompetent Pearson. Pearson has an established history of finding itself on the defendant end of lawsuits, including those related to copyright infringement, misuse of a nonprofit, and faulty reporting of results." | by Mercedes Schneider

  

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The Importance of Doing Schoolwork That Matters

The Importance of Doing Schoolwork That Matters | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"If our students look at the work we’re asking them to do today and say 'It doesn’t matter,' we’re missing a huge opportunity to help them become the learners they now need to be. 'Work that matters' has significance beyond classroom walls; it’s work that is created for an authentic audience who might  enjoy it or benefit from it even in a small way. It’s work that isn’t simply passed to the teacher for a grade, or shared with peers for review. It’s work that potentially makes a difference in the world. And while we’ve always been able to do 'work that matters' in our classrooms, our growing access to the Web and the tools and technologies of the modern world can certainly amplify the potentials for audience and for real world application of whatever it is our students are doing. Suddenly, our students have a potential  audience of 2.5 billion people who could become readers or collaborators, and they’ve got all sorts of tools and apps in their backpacks that they can use to create really beautiful, meaningful work in ways that most of their teachers couldn’t imagine doing when they were in school. I would argue, in fact, that the growing access to knowledge, information, people, and tools that our students are getting demands a shift in how we think about the work they do in school, one that moves them away from traditional, institutionally organized 'assignments' and toward more student-organized projects that are centered on the intersection of their interests and the subject or standard at hand." | by Will Richardson

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IBM 's Watson: Is Artificial Intelligence The Future of Work?

IBM 's Watson: Is Artificial Intelligence The Future of Work? | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Armed with $1 billion in financing, an unprecedented degree of autonomy within IBM, and an entire Manhattan city block, IBM launched its media blitz to show the world its vision of a future enhanced and enabled by Watson, its artificial intelligence technology. IBM has staked a lot on Watson, and this distributed model of selling artificial intelligence to the masses, but the company’s employees are true believers in the transformative power of Watson to change the ways human interact with computers. For the company it’s a step-change in the evolution of technology in the same way that the machine age brought a new relationship between humanity and its tools. 'Working with cognitive computing is a dialogue,' said Gil in his presentation on Watson’s ability to heal the sick. '[It has] the capacity to enhance and scale our minds in a partnership.' | by Jonathan Shieber

 

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The Teenage Brain

The Teenage Brain | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

What is going on in the heads of teenagers? Surprisingly or not, when teenagers go about their daily lives, especially when they communicate with others, their teenage brains do not function in the same way that adult brains do. This video segment from FRONTLINE: 'Inside the Teenage Brain' explores some of the more striking differences between the brains of kids and the brains of their parents and teachers. | via PBS Learning

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The 10K Hour Rule: Deliberate Practice DOES Lead to Expertise

The 10K Hour Rule: Deliberate Practice DOES Lead to Expertise | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"A recent article in Slate suggests that practice may not lead to expertise, that the '10,000 hour rule' is wrong. The '10,000 hour rule' was popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in his book Outliers, but really comes from an important paper by K. Anders Ericsson and colleagues, 'The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance.' Ericsson claimed that 10,000 hours of deliberate practice results in expert-level performance. The Slate article is based mostly on a new meta-analysis (see here) by Macnamara, Hambrick (also a co-author on the Slate article), and Oswald which reviewed and combined studies on expertise. They found that practice always was positively correlated with better performance, but did not explain all of (or even most of) the difference in expertise between study participants. The Slate article authors suggest, then, that deliberate practice is not as important as genetics or innate talent. The paper and article make two big mistakes that leave the '10,000 hour rule' as valid and valuable. The first is that practice is not the same as deliberate practice, and the second is that the fallback position can’t be genetics/innate talent. In general, their argument hinges on practice hours all being of equal value, which shows a lack of appreciation for the role of teaching." | by Mark Guzdial

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How Stress Affects the Brain During Learning

How Stress Affects the Brain During Learning | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"A fight or flight reaction may be useful in some situations, but it is highly detrimental in the classroom. Whether anxiety stems from test taking or from an unstable home environment, the brains of students experiencing high levels of stress look different than those who are not — and those brains behave differently, too. In this article, we’ll take a look at the neural and hormonal responses that underpin a student’s stress response, and make a few suggestions for continuing to teach through the challenges it presents." | by Leah Levy

 
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The Maker Movement: The Future Of Meaningful Learning

The Maker Movement: The Future Of Meaningful Learning | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Many teachers know that children learn best by doing. In recent years, the Maker movement has generated a new following in education with many teachers adding interesting new tools and materials like robots, 3D printing, e-textiles, and more. The idea that interesting materials and opportunities for students to work independently on in-depth projects dovetails nicely into what we know about creating optimal learning environments for children. One of the first people to understand the potential of computers in education was Seymour Papert, a mathematician who worked with Piaget and helped found the MIT Media Lab. Papert defined a learning theory, constructionism, that holds the key to understanding the educational potential of the Maker movement: 'From constructivist theories of psychology, we take a view of learning as a reconstruction rather than as a transmission of knowledge. Then we extend the idea of manipulative materials to the idea that learning is most effective when part of an activity the learner experiences is constructing a meaningful product.'" | by Sylvia Martinez

 

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All Children Are Supposed To Be Proficient. What Happened?

All Children Are Supposed To Be Proficient. What Happened? | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"In the midst of war, terrorism, fear and mourning, one bill passed 87-10 in the Senate and by a similar margin in the House — with equal support from both sides of the aisle. It was signed into law in January 2002 by George W. Bush, with the liberal lion of the Senate, Ted Kennedy, by his side. The law set a simple if daunting goal: All of the nation's students would perform at grade level on state tests. Every single one. 100 percent. Or as the name of the law put it, there would be No Child Left Behind. So here it is, 12 years later, 2014. And the law, NCLB, is still in effect. All children, under federal law, are supposed to be at grade level. Spoiler alert: They're not. According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the 'Nation's Report Card,' 'proficiency' rates last year were below 50 percent for every racial and ethnic group, in both reading and math, in both 4th and 8th grade. The exceptions? Asians, in all subjects (51-64 percent) and whites in 4th grade math only (54 percent)." | by Anya Kamenetz

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What The Theory of Disruptive Innovation Gets Wrong

What The Theory of Disruptive Innovation Gets Wrong | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Ever since 'The Innovator’s Dilemma,' everyone is either disrupting or being disrupted. There are disruption consultants, disruption conferences, and disruption seminars. This fall, the University of Southern California is opening a new program: 'The degree is in disruption,' the university announced. 'Disrupt or be disrupted,' the venture capitalist Josh Linkner warns in a new book, 'The Road to Reinvention,' in which he argues that 'fickle consumer trends, friction-free markets, and political unrest,' along with 'dizzying speed, exponential complexity, and mind-numbing technology advances,' mean that the time has come to panic as you’ve never panicked before. Larry Downes and Paul Nunes, who blog for Forbes, insist that we have entered a new and even scarier stage: 'big bang disruption.' 'This isn’t disruptive innovation,' they warn. 'It’s devastating innovation.' Things you own or use that are now considered to be the product of disruptive innovation include your smartphone and many of its apps, which have disrupted businesses from travel agencies and record stores to mapmaking and taxi dispatch. Much more disruption, we are told, lies ahead. Christensen has co-written books urging disruptive innovation in higher education (The Innovative University), public schools (Disrupting Class), and health care (The Innovator’s Prescription). His acolytes and imitators, including no small number of hucksters, have called for the disruption of more or less everything else." | by Jill Lepore

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North Carolina's Clever Way To Get Rid of Teachers

North Carolina's Clever Way To Get Rid of Teachers | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"When the North Carolina Senate rolled out a new step salary schedule for teachers last year, it was reported in the state media as offering a big raise to educators while taking away job protections. But the new plan isn’t exactly what it seems. It  'incentivizes'  teachers at specific experience levels to leave the classroom and find another profession. First, it keeps teacher pay flat through the first four years of a teacher’s career to the tune of $33,000 per year, a clear distinction from Governor Pat McCrory’s pay proposal. Then, the Senate scale increases teacher pay $1,000 for every year of service through a teacher’s twentieth year–still not bad. Keep your job another year, earn a grand. But then, oddly, teacher pay flattens again–teachers earn the same $50,000 wage from years 20-29. That’s a decade of service without a pay raise. In year 30, teachers earn just $42 more. Then, wages rise again, topping out at $56,129 at 36 years of service. Make no mistake–the Senate pay scale rewards young teachers and pushes older teachers out in the last third of their career." | by James Hogan

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University Students Shunning Books In Favor of Wikipedia

University Students Shunning Books In Favor of Wikipedia | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Students are completing university degrees without reading a single book because of the availability of information on the internet, a leading academic has warned. Many undergraduates no longer 'see the point of wasting time with books' when they can access facts using websites such as Wikipedia and SparkNotes, it was claimed. Orlando Figes, professor of history at Birkbeck, University of London, said the shift away from books was principally driven by an exams culture in schools, with many pupils being encouraged to scan texts to pass tests rather than 'read in ways that advance understanding and knowledge'." | by Graeme Paton

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Loretta VU's curator insight, October 12, 12:35 AM

So true the kids at the school I work at always search Wiki to find answers to any question/s raised and believe what it tells them is the truth they don't understand the information can be changed by other users and they need to verify any info with other sources 

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What Happens When Your Teacher Becomes A Machine?

What Happens When Your Teacher Becomes A Machine? | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"Sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education, a new type of segregation is spreading across the urban landscape. The US Chamber of Commerce, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), Americans for Prosperity and their legislative allies are promoting an ambitious, two-pronged agenda for poor cities: replace public schools with privately run charter schools, and replace teachers with technology. Corporate lobbyists are increasingly promoting a type of charter school that places an emphasis on technology instead of human teachers. One of the exemplars of this model is Rocketship Education, based in Silicon Valley but with contracts to open schools in Milwaukee, Memphis, Nashville and Washington, DC. Rocketship’s model is based on four principles. First, the company cuts costs by eliminating teachers. Starting in kindergarten, students spend about one-quarter of their class time in teacherless computer labs, using video-game-based math and reading applications. The company has voiced hopes of increasing digital instruction to as much as 50 percent of student learning time. Second, Rocketship relies on a corps of young, inexperienced, low-cost teachers. The turnover rate is dramatic—nearly 30 percent last year—but the company pays Teach for America to supply a steady stream of replacements. Third, the school has narrowed its curriculum to a near-exclusive focus on math and reading. Since both Rocketship’s marketing strategy and teachers’ salaries are based on reading and math scores, other subjects are treated as inessential. There are no dedicated social studies or science classes, no music or foreign-language instruction, no guidance counselors and no libraries. Finally, Rocketship maintains a relentless focus on teaching to the test. Students take math exams every eight weeks; following each, the staff revises lesson plans with an eye to improving scores. Rocketship boasts of its “backwards-mapping” pedagogy—starting with the test standards and then developing lesson plans to meet them. Rocketship is, as near as possible, all test-prep all the time." | by Gordon Lafer

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The Deafening Silence of Teachers

The Deafening Silence of Teachers | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

"As Americans we have always been taught that one of the greatest things about being an American Citizen is that we are protected by the First Amendment in the United States Constitution. We pride ourselves with having the ability to speak without fear of retribution and to make sure if injustices are occurring, we have the ability to addressing them. However somewhere between the United States Constitution and modern day education reform in America, teachers have lost their ability to speak up about injustices without fear of retribution. Despite the U.S. Constitution being a 'living document,' there are educators who are petrified of speaking out against the wrongs we are currently witnessing in education today. To demonstrate how freedom of speech is non existent in some schools, walk into any school and ask a teacher to go on record to discuss the ills in public education. Instead of getting an abundance of answers you will be met with a deafening silence. Silence not because teachers don't have an opinion, but silence because their words many times are used to hurt them professionally. Apparently, the first amendment does not apply to teachers.

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Study Finds Lectures Aren't Just Boring, They're Ineffective Too

Study Finds Lectures Aren't Just Boring, They're Ineffective Too | Spaces Between | Scoop.it

A new study finds that undergraduate students in classes with traditional stand-and-deliver lectures are 1.5 times more likely to fail than students in classes that use more stimulating, so-called active learning methods. 'Universities were founded in Western Europe in 1050 and lecturing has been the predominant form of teaching ever since,' says biologist Scott Freeman of the University of Washington, Seattle. But many scholars have challenged the 'sage on a stage' approach to teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses, arguing that engaging students with questions or group activities is more effective. To weigh the evidence, Freeman and a group of colleagues analyzed 225 studies of undergraduate STEM teaching methods. The meta-analysis, published online today in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, concluded that teaching approaches that turned students into active participants rather than passive listeners reduced failure rates and boosted scores on exams by almost one-half a standard deviation. '“This is a really important article—the impression I get is that it’s almost unethical to be lecturing if you have this data,' says Eric Mazur, a physicist at Harvard University who has campaigned against stale lecturing techniques for 27 years and was not involved in the work. 'It’s good to see such a cohesive picture emerge from their meta-analysis—an abundance of proof that lecturing is outmoded, outdated, and inefficient.'" | by Aleszu Bajak 

 
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