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How Powerful is Visual Content - here are the Facts & Figures [Infographic]

How Powerful is Visual Content - here are the Facts & Figures [Infographic] | The Social Web | Scoop.it

This article and infographic was posted by Jeff Bullas. We all know visual content attracts attention - here are some highlights on just how powerful it really is in social media.

 

Excerpt:

 

"Visual content has been on a rapid upward trajectory over the last 12 months. Social media platforms such as Pinterest and Instagram have taken the social media world by storm. Instagram announced in July that it had acquired 80 million users"

 

** Pinterest and Instagram have taken the social media world by storm.Instagram announced in July that it had acquired 80 million users. To put some further perspective on its adoption and growth, the visual social media network is now being used by 40% of the worlds top 100 brands.

 

Simply Measured looked at Facebook’s top 10 brand pages to find out the real numbers and facts and figures on the engagement and sharing levels of photos and vides in comparison to text and discovered:

 

Videos are Shared Photos are liked 200% more than text updates

 

To put some perspective on the power of visual content other studies show that Photo and video posts on Pinterest are referring more traffic than Twitter, Stumbleupon, LinkedIn and Google+.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

See full article and infographic here: [http://bit.ly/Oj0yKP

 


Via janlgordon, Beth Kanter
Stephen Dale's insight:

A picture paints a thousand words!

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Two Pens's curator insight, December 15, 2012 10:55 AM

Visual imagery + story telling. You can't get a better combo.

Ferananda's comment, December 23, 2012 5:52 PM
You are so awesome Beth. Never cease to amuse me. Might 2013 bring you big flows of love. thank you for your work!
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To Email or To Collaborate: Unlocking Value of Social Collaboration

To Email or To Collaborate: Unlocking Value of Social Collaboration | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Do you remember that old familiar chime “you’ve got mail!”? You couldn’t wait to open the mailbox flag icon on your desktop that signaled a new email message was waiting to be read.
Stephen Dale's insight:
Stephen Dale's insight:Many organizational leaders today struggle with the decision to remain in the comforts of communicating with colleagues through familiar email platforms, or to move to more advanced social collaboration platforms that encourage communicating and sharing between teams in real-time. And in this later scene, significant benefits can be received such as increased employee engagement, knowledge sharing and productivity. Email works well when sending confidential or restricted information, or if you want to control the content or broadcast a message to multiple contacts as part of an online marketing campaign. However when it comes to collaborating with teams on time-sensitive projects, or to gain critical insight from others on documents and business decisions, email has proven time and time again to be a major hindrance to an organisation’s productivity.  Insight and value: 8/10
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Google+ Introduces “Communities” To Replace Old School Groups, Forums And Message Boards | TechCrunch

Google+ Introduces “Communities” To Replace Old School Groups, Forums And Message Boards | TechCrunch | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Google+ announces support for Communities.

 

From the article: 

 

"The feature will be rolling out to all users today.

If you’ve been a heavy Internet user over the past ten years, you might be familiar with this concept. Yahoo! really nailed it with Yahoo! Groups, as it quickly became the destination to set up a place to discuss your kid’s soccer team, technology, sports, world events and everything in between.

 

The flaw with products like that, including Google’s own “Groups”, is that it’s not integrated with anything else, they were standalone. It meant that you had to stop what you were doing and go somewhere else to interact. That was fine when there was nothing to do on the Internet, but now that we have a multitude of sites and options to keep us busy, that simply doesn’t fly anymore."

 

The new Communities feature is found in the left-hand toolbar. allowing you to create your own or search out others. You can find ones that interest you within the Google+ unified search experience.

 

There are four types of Community space that you can set up:

- public,

- public with membership required to interact,

- private but discoverable,

- private but not discoverable or indexed.

 

Some people may confuse Communitis with Circles, but the two are different. Think of it this way: a circle is categorised by PEOPLE, e.g. friends, famly, experts, etc. with fairly random conversations on a variey of topics. A  Community is categorised by a specific TOPIC, i.e. the conversations will be specific to the topic or theme.

 

It will be interesting to see whether Circles will co-exist with Google Groups in the longer term, or if Google intdends to fold Groups into Circles.

 

Value: 9/10

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A 1945 Essay On Information Overload, Curation, And Open-Access Science | Maria Popova

A 1945 Essay On Information Overload, Curation, And Open-Access Science | Maria Popova | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article by great curator Maria Popova:

"Tim O’Reilly recently admonished that unless we embrace open access over copyright, we’ll never get science policy right. The sentiment, which I believe applies to more than science, reminded me of an eloquent 1945 essay by Vannevar Bush, titled “As We May Think.”

 

Much of what Bush discusses presages present conversations about information overload, filtering, and our restless “FOMO” — fear of missing out, for anyone who did miss out on the memetic catchphrase — amidst the incessant influx. Bush worries about the impossibility of ever completely catching up and the unfavorable signal-to-noise ratio.

 

Bush makes an enormously important — and timely — point about the difference between merely compressing information to store it efficiently and actually making use of it in the way of gleaning knowledge.

 

To that end, I often think about the architecture of knowledge as a pyramid of sorts — at the base of it, there is all the information available to us; from it, we can generate some form of insight, which we then consolidate into knowledge; at our most optimal, at the top of the pyramid, we’re then able to glean from that knowledge some sort of wisdom about the world.

 

He stresses, as many of us believe today, that mechanization — or, algorithms in the contemporary equivalent — will never be a proper substitute for human judgment and creative thought in the filtration process.

 

He presages hypertext, the internet, and even Wikipedia — and, perhaps more importantly, laying out a model for what excellence at the intersection of the editorial and curatorial looks.

 

Bush nails the value of what we call today, not without resistance, “information curation”:

Bush wrote: "There is a new profession of trail blazers, those who find delight in the task of establishing useful trails through the enormous mass of the common record. The inheritance from the master becomes, not only his additions to the world’s record, but for his disciples the entire scaffolding by which they were erected."

 

He concludes by considering the cultural value and urgency, infinitely timelier today than it was in his day, of making our civilization’s “record” — the great wealth of information about how we got to where we are — manageable, digestible, and useful in our quest for knowledge, wisdom, and growth..."

 

Read full, long and interesting article here: 

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/10/11/as-we-may-think-1945/

 

 


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Lisa Labon's curator insight, January 28, 2013 9:52 AM

Mind boggling to think what that the overload of content he speaks of is now created in a single day, every day.

garassini's curator insight, March 11, 2013 6:51 AM

Applicare il metodo delle associazioni mentali all'archiviazione e alla ricerca delle informazioni. La visione profetica di Vannevar Bush.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 25, 2015 10:48 AM

Prescient

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5 Ways Social Learning Communities Transform Culture and Leadership - Forbes

5 Ways Social Learning Communities Transform Culture and Leadership - Forbes | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Community, more than any other factor, will transform the role of leaders and influence the development of workplace culture. Online social learning communities are redrawing the lines between leaders, employees, brands and culture. To ignore this force is to cede advantage to competitors. Being “social online” has real business value. 

 

The article lits 5 ways in which online communties are changing cultures and notions of leadership:

 

1. Online learning communities are challenging the value of academic ‘brands’.

2. Online learning communities have leveled the financial playing field and advantaged learners, not purveyors of degrees.

3. Online learners are empowered, and they will change your culture.

4. Online learners are empowered, and they will change your culture.

5. Online social learning communities are changing the value of employer brands.

 

if leaders ignore or wait to see what happens they’ll have missed the wave. Be present, be a leader, protect your social and workplace culture. And empower your employees to learn, participate and grow.

 

Relevant, Insightful. 9/10

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Twitter for Educators guide

Don't be put off by the title - a useful and practical introduction to Twitter for anyone - Educator or not!


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Lynnette Van Dyke's comment, November 23, 2012 9:21 AM
Awesome!!!
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New Digital Trends, The Age Of Mobile, Human Curation: The Decline Of Google News

New Digital Trends, The Age Of Mobile, Human Curation: The Decline Of Google News | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Here are some excerpts from this interesting article published on PandoDaily:

"Some publishers – namely AP, AFP, and Rupert Murdoch – have long taken umbrage with Google, whom they have accused of leeching off of newspapers’ content. Cantankerous Murdoch has called Google “content kleptomaniacs.”

 

Now, politicians and newspapers in Europe and South America are engaging in fresh revolts. 

Their reasoning: When Google News offers a headline and part of the first paragraph of a story, users are less inclined to click through to read the actual article.

...

One possibility is that Google News is in decline because of converging digital trends that are lessening its influence. The Web’s big shift to mobile coupled with the explosion of social sharing, the increasing importance of human-powered curation, and tougher competition may be making the now old-school aggregator less potent.

 

There are a lot of strong forces at play in the ever-tumultuous news industry that could compromise Google News’ dominance. First, we now live in the Age of Mobile, and it’s not clear how well Google News performs on smartphones. From its iOS search app, the “News” tab does sneak into the homescreen, in the form of a button in the bottom-right-hand corner, but it is not especially prominent. 

...

Another challenge for Google News has been the emerging mania for curation. Spotify founder Daniel Ek said that the next step in the music company’s evolution will be helping people “make sense” of the abundant content.

He flagged the Pinterest-led curation wave as an important phenomenon. Pinterest proves that a mix of algorithms and human judgement can provide a superior content consumption experience.

 

Indeed, there’s evidence to suggest that many Web users are becoming more curatorial in their consumption habits, a point supported not only by Pinterest’s rise, but also by the growing prevalence of services such as Foursquare’s “Explore” feature, Twitter’s “Discover” section, Reddit, HotelTonight, Longform, Longreads.

...

As mobile and apps accelerate the proliferation and accessibility of content, it’s likely that we’re going to rely more heavily on filters to navigate this era of abundance.

 

Finally, these days Google News just faces much more competition than ever before, from startups, apps, websites, and even traditional publishers, who have become more digitally savvy. Now that we’re in an era in which reading on smartphones and tablets is a norm, apps such as Flipboard, Pulse, Feedly, Prismatic, Zite, Flud, and Sumly, just to name a few, are all vying for attention, providing news reading experiences that are not only competitive with Google News but also better looking.

...

This means that readers have more, and sometimes better, options for discovering and reading news, and publishers have other viable traffic-generating options. Perhaps that is why publishers in Europe and Brazil are acting now to slay the search beast. They sense a vulnerability that Google News didn’t have even a year ago..."

 

Read full and long article here:

http://pandodaily.com/2012/11/10/newspapers-take-aim-at-google-news-again-maybe-because-theyre-no-longer-scared/

 

 


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Archive Your Entire Online Life With This Tool: Recollect

Archive Your Entire Online Life With This Tool: Recollect | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Excerpted from review article on Mashable:

"Recollect solves two problems at once by providing a simple tool to archive your online data and search through it later to re-discover your old posts.

 

The more information we share, the harder it can be to find any particular post later on and the more we have to lose if any of these networks ever disappear.

 

With Recollect, users can archive posts shared on Twitter, Instagram, Flickr and Foursquare – along with any comments on those posts from other users — and download a Zip file of all that data at any time. Prices for the service range from $6/month for 5,000 archived photos, one monthly data download and one account per social network, to a premium $24/month account that covers 50,000 archived photos, weekly downloads and up to 5 accounts per website. There is also an option to try out the service for 30 days, which gives users the ability to archive and download all their online data once for free.

 

For the beta release, the team decided to narrow their focus to working with just the four social networks mentioned above and building a set of four key features into the service, including the ability to archive posts, download data, browse through the archive and search for specific keywords.

 

Recollect offers a novel solution to what we might call the re-discovery problem — helping users categorize and unearth their treasure trove of old posts.

 

The team hopes to continue improving on Recollect by building what Martin describes as a more “intelligent archive,” which will offer additional options for browsing and discovering older content.

 

The group also plans to incorporate more social networks into Recollect, including Facebook..."

 

Read full article here: 

http://mashable.com/2012/11/10/recollect/

 

Check out it here: http://recollect.com

 


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New commenting system - philridout's Google Sites help site

New commenting system - philridout's Google Sites help site | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Google have started making changes to the recently introduced new commenting system described here. Be sure and check back from time to time for the latest updates.


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Why your knowledge-sharing portal will probably not save the world

Why your knowledge-sharing portal will probably not save the world | The Social Web | Scoop.it

One of the most common interventions that people attempt in order to support evidence-informed policy making is setting up an online portal/one-stop shop/knowledge sharing community. 

 

Kirsty Newman lists four questions to ask before setting up your knowledge sharing one-stop shop:

 

1. Is lack of a portal the problem?

2. Is sopmeone doing it already?

3. Can it be hosted on Facebook?

4. Who's one-stop shop is it?

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Content Curation Tool Scoop.it Introduces New Features: Apps And Extras

In the last week Content Curation Tool Scoop.it announced some new features:

- Google Chrome extension turns your browser into a powerful curation tool.
- The Scoop.it widget allows you to embed a slider from your topic pages.
- The BufferApp and Scoop.it integration is a way to easily schedule the distribution of your posts to social networks.

 

 

Check out full and new features here:

http://www.scoop.it/extras

 

Watch video tour about them: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q635eCVivUA

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Heiko Idensen, tami neuthal , Stephen Dale
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Curate and Publish Navigable Lists of Links with URList

Curate and Publish Navigable Lists of Links with URList | The Social Web | Scoop.it


Robin Good: Urlist is a web-based collaborative tool to create, publish and share navigable lists of links.

 

Links can be easily typed or collected with the complementary bookmarklet tool, and provided with a custom description. URList automatically collects the thumbnail for each one, and the list author decides whether individual items in the list can be commented and rated by viewers.

 

Items in a list can be easily sorted, moved around and edited at any point and each list can be set to be "public", "private" or "hidden" from public view. Lists can be set to be collaborative so that other users can contribute to them.

 

Every URlist can be also browsed as a sequence of viewable website links kept in context by a top-of-the-page navigation bar, which allows to move at any moment to any link in the list or to follow the list as it has been organized by the author.

 

Features tour: http://urli.st/resources/tour

 

Try it out now: http://urli.st/

 

 


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100 social media blog posts from 2012 that you simply have to bookmark

100 social media blog posts from 2012 that you simply have to bookmark | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Social media blogs are updated with thousands of posts on a weekly basis, but we wanted to sift through a list and create the 100 best ones from 2012 (A lot of great blog posts!

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Trust, Context and Humaness: That's What Makes One a True Curator

Trust, Context and Humaness: That's What Makes One a True Curator | The Social Web | Scoop.it

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Beth Kanter's comment, December 22, 2012 10:50 AM
love the term link spraying
Beth Kanter's curator insight, December 22, 2012 10:51 AM

Robin has curated list of definitions for content curation.  new term link spraying

Eric Moran's curator insight, February 13, 2013 3:50 PM

Common misconception about content curation is that everything is automated . This article does a great job explaining the human element involved in curating content. It also shares some bad habits people pick up from the unintentional convenience of automated tools.

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Make it easy for employees to be productive | Executive | Financial Post

Make it easy for employees to be productive | Executive | Financial Post | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Are you one of those people I see more and more frequently who carries multiple handheld devices - a smartphone for work and one for personal?

 

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is gaining traction across many industry sectors, with some statistical evidenc of the benefits. From the article:

 

- 28% of employees use non-company issued devices for work. By 2013, this number should be closer to 40%.

- Nearly 50% of surveyed companies have BYO policies in place and 94% expect to have one in place by mid-2013.

- By mid-2013, around 90% of companies will support employee-owned smartphones and laptops.

 

According to a Citrix report, the primary benefits of BYOD are:
-Improved employee satisfaction: 57%
-Worker productivity: 52%
-Greater mobility: 51%
-Flexible work environment: 46%
-Reduced IT costs: 36%

 

People use their personal smartphones during work hours. 92% of employers admitted they were aware that some of that use was work-related.

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Nielsen | Social Media Report 2012

Nielsen | Social Media Report 2012 | The Social Web | Scoop.it

The steady and pervasive growth of social media. Lots of statistics here if you like to look at the numbers, from number of people using the different social networks, to how long they spend on-line.  

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Humans Vs. Robots: Who's On Top? Steve Rosenbaum On Forbes

Humans Vs. Robots: Who's On Top? Steve Rosenbaum On Forbes | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article:

"In a room full of media heavyweights, CEOs, and high-tech entrepreneurs, the debate is hardly philosophical. "Will Robots overtake Humans?" and in some cases should they?

The Monaco Media Forum was the site of the showdown, and the panel was an esteemed group of thinkers and digital leaders...and with Steve Rosenbaum, a passionate advocate for human curation – both as the author of Curation Nation, and the CEO of Magnify.net.

 

Here I propose a new rule of robotics. That going forward Robots must identify themselves as robots – and can’t impersonate being a human being.

 

Automation makes things more efficient, more the same, more boring. But humans tends to make things that aren’t exactly the same. The nature of human creation is that it isn’t algorithmic, but it, in fact, will have connections and relationships that are both logical and illogical.

 

The human element is what makes it fun, surprising, and engaging. A robot can’t do that.

 

The shift that changes the equation is the sheer volume of content flooding the web. Digital overload is swamping the current recommendation engines, making the sharp knife of human editorial a better filter than the blunt instrument of algorithmic recommendation.

 

For the future – the question of where humans and robots share joint custody of the future remains unclear. But until then, having robots not impersonate people seems like a reasonable place to draw the line..."

 

Read full original article: 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenrosenbaum/2012/11/26/humans-vs-robots-whos-on-top/

 

Watch the video of the Monaco Media Forum panel here:

http://www.steverosenbaum.me/video/Monaco-Media-Forum-2012-Round-2

 

 


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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, November 27, 2012 12:36 PM

Interesting write-up by Steve Rosenbaum on how algorithms and humans compete to solve some of the biggest technological challenges today. Particularly in the content curation space, which reminds me of my own talk at Data Week earlier this year.

Eelco Kraefft's curator insight, December 15, 2012 7:55 AM

Kurzweil, author of The Singularity is Near', and mentioned in this article was just hired by Google. Does this mean Google News will soon grow into a more perfect content (80%+) curator than Rosenbaum now sees, compared to humans?

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Learning and the Emerging Science of Behavior Change, aka 'Nudging' | Ben Williamson

Learning and the Emerging Science of Behavior Change, aka 'Nudging' | Ben Williamson | The Social Web | Scoop.it

"The emerging field of behaviour change theory suggests new ways in which networked technologies might be used as a form of pedagogical persuasion to influence and shape learners’ behavior, even at the unconscious or irrational level."

 

Comment: A very interesting and thought-provoking reflection on current changes in pedagogical climate, which are very much exemplified by the move towards networked learning. Williamson first notes the prevalence of terms such as softness and openness. This, he contends, amounts to softening up education: "As opposed to the hard education of canonical core content, the softened school of the future does not impose rigid academic barricades against informal learning outside school".

 

This new open education paradigm is characterised by open educational resources, an emphasis on soft skills, and most of all soft (libertarian) paternalism: "policies and practices which are designed in such a way that they are intended to subtly shape and change behavior". This is the nudging referred to in the title.

 

So, in networks for learning, we do not coerce people into doing what we think they should. In stead, we monitor them and try to subtly persuade them to move into the 'right' direction: "The learner enmeshed in digitally mediated networks is forever being nudged from afar rather than instructed; subtly tutored instead of lectured".

 

The problem with this, Williamson says, is that it comes dangerously close to being manipulative: "... as the language of 21st century learning becomes increasingly saturated with new “open” and networked formats and new “soft” behavioral competencies it may become hard to distinguish from the soft control techniques of behavioral optimization programs, soft performance, and other political strategies of subtle psychological persuasion"
Indeed, if you can't get things your way by bullying people, you 'sweet talk' them into it. And whereas bullying is at least obvious (even if you have no way to to escape it), with nudging the victim herself may start to belief this is in her best interest. It is a real danger, but I still prefer arguments, even if they are 'sweetened', as opposed to intimidation. Ultimately, it is a matter of ethics.

 

As much as resarchers should tell their subjects what the experiment is intended for, so should learners be told what they are getting themselves involved in. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, December 20, 2012 12:25 PM

A very interesting and thought-provoking reflection on current changes in pedagogical climate, which are very much exemplified by the move towards networked learning. Williamson first notes the prevalence of terms such as softness and openness. This, he contends, amounts to softening up education: "As opposed to the hard education of canonical core content, the softened school of the future does not impose rigid academic barricades against informal learning outside school". This new open education paradigm is characterised by open educational resources, an emphasis on soft skills, and most of all soft (libertarian) paternalism: "policies and practices which are designed in such a way that they are intended to subtly shape and change behavior". This is the nudging referred to in the title. So, in networks for learning, we do not coerce people into doing what we think they should. In stead, we monitor them and try to subtly persuade them to move into the 'right' direction: "The learner enmeshed in digitally mediated networks is forever being nudged from afar rather than instructed; subtly tutored instead of lectured". The problem with this, Williamson says, is that it comes dangerously close to being manipulative: "... as the language of 21st century learning becomes increasingly saturated with new “open” and networked formats and new “soft” behavioral competencies it may become hard to distinguish from the soft control techniques of behavioral optimization programs, soft performance, and other political strategies of subtle psychological persuasion"
Indeed, if you can't get things your way by bullying people, you 'sweet talk' them into it. And whereas bullying is at least obvious (even if you have no way to to escape it), with nudging the victim herself may start to belief this is in her best interest. It is a real danger, but I still prefer arguments, even if they are 'sweetened', as opposed to intimidation. Ultimately, it is a matter of ethics. As much as resarchers should tell their subjects what the experiment is intended for, so should learners be told what they are getting themselves involved in. (@pbsloep)

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This Trend Is Very Worrisome For Apple

This Trend Is Very Worrisome For Apple | The Social Web | Scoop.it

From the article:

 

Android and Apple continue to dominate the global mobile market, but Apple is losing (relative) share fast. According to a recent IDC report, these two platforms now have a staggering 90% of global market share, while everyone else is down to 10%.


Both Android and Apple are also still gaining share, while every other platform is losing it. But Android is still gaining share faster than Apple.

 

In the third quarter, IDC reports, Android sales accounted for a staggering 75% of the smartphone market. Apple sales, meanwhile, accounted for only 15%. Android is still gaining share rapidly, so Apple's share may shrink even further.

 

All of these gains have come from the collapse of other platforms, namely RIM, Microsoft, and Palm, which, collectively, have collapsed from 49% of the market to 13% of the market.

 

#mobileworking

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How ‘social intelligence’ can guide decisions - McKinsey Quarterly - Strategy - Strategic Thinking

How ‘social intelligence’ can guide decisions - McKinsey Quarterly - Strategy - Strategic Thinking | The Social Web | Scoop.it

From the article:

 

The information that companies need to meet competitive challenges is moving quickly from published and proprietary sources to the open, chaotic world of social platforms. Navigating this new environment effectively will require new skills and a willingness to engage in social conversations rather than merely assemble information. This is a mission that should extend across the organization. Senior executives can’t leave such important work to specialists. Social intelligence will sharpen strategic insights, and leaders must be immersed in the new information currents. #socbiz #smtrng

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The Fourth Wave of Social Media

The Fourth Wave of Social Media | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Some truth here, and this point from the article particularly resonated

"We now recognize that we’ve focused too much on the marketing and communications campaign aspects of social media", but then goes on to talk about business models, whereas the real benefit of social media always was and always will be the power it gives individuals (i.e. people, not organisations) to connect, engage and be heard. #smtrng #socbiz

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McLuhan (1911-1980): medium is message - Gutenburg to Zuckerberg

McLuhan (1911-1980): medium is message - Gutenburg to Zuckerberg | The Social Web | Scoop.it

In essence, McLuhan opened our minds to the role of technology and media by asking the right questions. He wanted to know how technology and media affect our minds, habits, society and culture. Late in his life he gave us, what in my opinion, is his most useful piece of work – the tetrad. His "tetrad" of four media laws tried to clarify the nature & impact of a technology or medium


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Recession Drives 75% of Businesses to Use Online Collaboration Tools | Business 2 Community

Recession Drives 75% of Businesses to Use Online Collaboration Tools | Business 2 Community | The Social Web | Scoop.it

From the article:

 

According to a recent McKinsey Report office workers spend an average of 28 hours a week writing emails, searching for information and collaborating internally.

 

Clinked.com, a UK-based business collaboration start-up, has just published an infographic highlighting the fact that 75% of businesses say online collaboration tools will be “important” or “somewhat important” to their business during the next 12 months.

 

 

Some statistics

- 7 out of 10 internet users are using social networks to connect, share content and stay informed

- 96% of executives cite lack of collaboration or ineffective communication for work-place failures.

-20-25% less productivity when failing to implement social technology

- almost 50% of organisations see knowledge sharing as the top purpose for social collaboration

- employees spend an average of 9 hours/week searching for information.

 

 

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Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Data & Informatics
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The complete guide to Twitter’s language and acronyms

The complete guide to Twitter’s language and acronyms | The Social Web | Scoop.it

The beauty and challenge of Twitter is stuffing your most sophisticated thoughts and feelings into a measly 140 characters (or less). No good tweet is ever going to be 140 characters because it’s impossible to share, respond or reference a tweet that’s already at it’s max. If you want to make a big statement with a small message, you have to trim the fat. From the basic beginner to a tweet-savvy expert, this cheat sheet will help you navigate the perplexing and concentrated language that often appears in the stream, and make you seem like a regular pro in no time.

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Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Data & Informatics
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Do You Know How Social Currency Influences Behavior?

Do You Know How Social Currency Influences Behavior? | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Conversation Agent quotes on Influence from Valeria Maltoni It's the age of the connected customer and people are now comfortable using technology to share -- privately or in public.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

How social currency influences behavior

 

**Social influences include peer pressure and social exchange. The latter is stronger than an economic motive.

 

**Most human interactions consist of an exchange of value. From a psychological standpoint, actions like sharing signal desire for self expression, need for validation, and social status recognition, and also simply altruism and affinity with a group or cause.

 

**Both social influences are amplified in public settings.

 

Psychologist Robert Cialdini documented six principles of ethical persuasion:

 

**social proof

 

**authority

 

**affinity

 

**commitment

 

**consistency

 

**reciprocity

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article, see slideshare, images here: [http://bit.ly/VySDuu]


Via janlgordon, Stephen Dale
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Thomas Wooldridge's comment, April 19, 2013 7:17 AM
social Proof.. It is what we all seek