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Sending People To See Other Sites Works: One Million Page Views Just by Curating Content

Sending People To See Other Sites Works: One Million Page Views Just by Curating Content | The Social Web | Scoop.it

http://www.MasterNewMedia.org/


Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

Whether novice or experienced curator, Scoop.it is a great tool for finding and curating content, and Robin Good is the example to follow.

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David Bennett's comment, August 30, 2013 4:37 AM
I put up a post in Light Reading (a WP.com blog) and gave you attribution and a mention:

http://photographworks.wordpress.com/2013/08/30/say-it-with-a-tweet/
Michael Ehline's comment, September 3, 2013 6:04 AM
Man this one has gone viral. I see it everywhere.
harish magan's comment, September 3, 2013 7:21 AM
Ok I agree with you, let it be
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shift 2020 - How 3D Printing Will Impact Our Future

Slides from my presentation at 3D Printshow in London on September 5, 2014 #shift2020 #3dprint #3dprintshow
Stephen Dale's insight:

I've picked this because it identifies a facet of open knowledge that is becoming increasingly important - the concept of "open manufacturing".

 

Additive manufacturing - or 3D printing as it is more commonly known - is being used in more industry sectors than ever before. New materials and use cases have led to 3D manufacturing in Robotics, Health, Entertainment, Automobiles, Fashion, Construction etc.

 

I particularly liked this quote from David Rowan at Wired: "The democratisation of manufacturing will empower anyone with a compelling idea to prototype, make and launch a physical product at speed and low cost".

 

3D printing is no longer a niche activity for the hobbyists - it is potentially the most important innovation of this decade.

 

Reading time: 15 mins

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Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Make Storytelling Part of Your Company DNA: 6 Best Ways

Make Storytelling Part of Your Company DNA: 6 Best Ways | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Everyone loves a good story. Everyone. Which is why storytelling should be at the heart of your nonprofit’s strategic communications. I know ‘storytelling’ is a meme du jour. But that’s no reason to ignore it. Just because everyone else is doing it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t! There’s a reason these phrases become buzzworthy. In this [...]

Via Karen Dietz
Stephen Dale's insight:

I liked these two points:

 

1. Look for emotionally compelling stories that relate to content that is relevant to your audiences.

2. Look for stories that show folks how they can prevent an unhappy ending.


Perhaps especially point 2!

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 3, 11:21 AM

I like the 6 ways shared here for making storytelling part of the ongoing activities of your organization -- whether its a nonprofit or for profit firm.


Once an organization embraces storytelling, then the next round of work is how to continually gather stories to share in different media.


The 6 pathways shared here will help you get that next piece done. Story on!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Enterprise Social Network, Social Business & Collaboration News
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Social Signals, Social Noise and Knowledge Management

Social Signals, Social Noise and Knowledge Management | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Social information is very different from traditional documentation.

Via Mumba Cloud
Stephen Dale's insight:

Information Theory teaches  us that almost all information carries extraneous clutter, background noise, padding, carrier waves, etc., that are unrelated to the core “message.” The earliest days of analog signaling rapidly uncovered the signal to noise problem — if a message is hard to hear because of background static, turning up the volume amplifies the noise along with the signal. Context and Curation help us to isolate the signal from the noise. 

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What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet

What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Michael Harris is the author of “The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection,” a new book about how technology affects society. It follows in the footsteps of Nicholas Carr, whose “The Shallows” is a modern classic of internet criticism. But Harris takes a different path from those that have come before. Instead of a broad investigation into the effects of constant connectivity on human behaviour, Harris looks at a very specific demographic: people born before 1985, or the very opposite of the “millennial” demographic coveted by advertisers and targeted by new media outlets.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

”If we’re the last people in history to know life before the internet, we are also the only ones who will ever speak, as it were, both languages. We are the only fluent translators of Before and After.”

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 23, 1:19 AM

This is an excellent article by Leo Mirani about a subject close to my heart.


People born before 1985 are the middle generation. We’re the last people in history to know life before the internet, we are also the only ones who will ever speak, as it were, both languagesWe are the only fluent translators of Before and After.”


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There's a quiet revolution pulling some numbers down

There's a quiet revolution pulling some numbers down | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Steven Rosenbush and Clint Boulton of the Wall Street Journal did some interesting analysis of the social business — or work technologies — market recently, and determined that various analysis firms have been dropping their estimates of the size and growth of that market, quite considerably. For example, they report that IDC said in 2012…
Stephen Dale's insight:

There's a gradual transition from mass communication via the traditional social business platforms towards more tightly and more frequent communication using specialised "chat apps". It’s not a scene of hundreds or thousands of users communicating, but small teams of intensely networked individuals. #socbiz #trends

 

Reading time: 5 mins

Relevance to future of work: 8/10

 

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4 Ways To Beat Disruptive Innovation

4 Ways To Beat Disruptive Innovation | The Social Web | Scoop.it
We need to focus on how we can learn, not what we think we know.
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article:

 

We need to effectively change the software in organizations to become more sensitive to changes in the marketplace and adaptable. This transformation starts with data, which needs to be made not only more accessible, but more easily combined with analytic resources to become actionable.

 

But most of all, it requires a change in perspective.  We can’t wait for emerging trends to become salient, by then it’s often too late.  Rather, we must focus on emerging platforms and build the skills we need to integrate with them.

 

Reading time: 5 minutes

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70 of the Most Useful Websites on the Internet - StumbleUpon

Stephen Dale's insight:

A somewhat eclectic list of "useful" websites. Usefulness is in the eye of the beholder!

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The elements of great social media profiles

The elements of great social media profiles | The Social Web | Scoop.it

This infographic from TollFreeForwarding.com shows the ins-and-outs of building a profile on each major social media site.


Via Baochi
Stephen Dale's insight:

Useful tips on what to include in your social profile in an infographic created by TollFreeForwarding.com 

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The Cost of Continuously Checking Email #socbiz

The Cost of Continuously Checking Email #socbiz | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Suppose each time you ran low on an item in your kitchen—olive oil, bananas, napkins—your instinctive response was to drop everything and race to the store. How much time would you lose? How much money would you squander on gas? What would happen to your productivity?


We all recognize the inefficiency of this approach. And yet surprisingly, we often work in ways that are equally wasteful.


The reason we keep a shopping list and try to keep supermarket trips to a minimum is that it’s easy to see the cost of driving to the store every time we crave a bag of potato chips. What is less obvious to us, however, is the cognitive price we pay each time we drop everything and switch activities to satisfy a mental craving.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:
Breaking the email habit has to start with the realisation that you are an addict!
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 8, 12:45 AM

According to a University of California-Irvine study, regaining our initial momentum following an interruption can take, on average, upwards of 20 minutes.

Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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The Science and Psychology of Twitter: Why We Follow, Favorite and Share – 3cseo

The Science and Psychology of Twitter: Why We Follow, Favorite and Share – 3cseo | The Social Web | Scoop.it

When I choose someone new to follow, when I compose a new tweet, when I share and favorite an update, I seldom think about the why. My following sessions would probably seem haphazard to an outsider, and my favoriting technique comes and goes from one strategy to another.

 

Even so, the way I use Twitter is far less random than I thought. There is science and psychology behind the way we all tweet.

 

Researchers have discovered trends in the way that we perform every major action on Twitter—favoriting, updating, sharing, and following. And there's even an interesting bit of psychology behind what makes Twitter so attractive in the first place. Here's a look at the psychology of Twitter: what makes us follow, favorite, share and keep coming back for more....


Via Jeff Domansky
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article:

What spurs us to follow someone on Twitter? Researchers at Georgia Tech and Michigan combined to study the factors involved in following.

 

The factors they came up with boiled down to three categories: social behaviors, message content, and social network structure. Here are the individual factors for each, starting with social behaviors:

Tweet volumeBurstiness – tweets per hourInteractions – replies, mentions, and favoritesBroadcast communication – the ratio of tweets with no @-mentionTrustworthiness of the profile – How well is the bio filled out? Is there a URL in the profile? Is there a location listed?

 

The individual factors for message content:

Positive/negative sentimentInformational content – ratio of tweets containing either a URL, RT, MT, HT, or “via”Meformer content – ratio of tweets containing self-referencing pronouns like “I,” “me,” “we,” and “us”Topic focusRetweets – how often your content gets retweetedHashtag usageTReDIX – Tweet Reading Difficulty Index (based on the frequency of real English words longer than 6 letters)

 

The individual factors in social network structure:

Reciprocity – The number of people you follow who also follow youAttention-status ratio – Total followers compared to total followingNetwork overlap – How similar are the people you follow to those a follower follows

 

Does any of this resonate with how you choose who to follow?

 

#socmed

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, July 7, 9:55 PM

This is so informative and so helpful! It is an exhaustive study on my we are addicted to micro-social networking sights, and the writer has explained this through his understanding of Psychology. Intermittent conditioning is the term used to explain why we keep returning to the site. A single re-tweet, or a single favorite would be enough to keep us visiting the site from time to time! The researcher has also narrowed down some of the possible factors that might contribute to one's popularity on a social networking site. The findings of this research have implications for not just Twitter, but also Facebook, and Blog spot.  Being a regular writer on Blog spot, I was able to gain important ideas about how to make my posts more visible, and to be able to get more hits. I am sure that all bloggers and  tweeters will gain a lot after reading this!

pink HA media's curator insight, July 8, 4:07 AM

Tweet shrink

Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, July 10, 3:38 AM

Eternas preguntas del marketing y todas las ciencias humanas: por qué "megusta" en FB,  por qué "seguir" en Twitter, por qué "conectar" en LinkedIn... ¿¡Por qué "comprar" en el supermercado!?

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Curate and Follow Your Key Favorite Twitter Sources with Happy Friends

Curate and Follow Your Key Favorite Twitter Sources with Happy Friends | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

A super Twitter utility service for aggregating your favourite Twitter resources,

 

#socmed

#twitter

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Robin Good's curator insight, June 29, 7:20 AM



Happy Friends is a new free tool created by Dave Winer which allows you to closely follow those Twitter accounts for which you don't want to miss a beat. 


Happy Friends makes it easy for you to add (but not to delete for now) any Twitter account you want and to easily expand it to see all of its most recent tweets. 


The result is a simple interface which lists your favorite Twitter sources and allows you to check rapidly what each one of them has posted. 


What may escape anyone not reading this, is that by clicking on any of the headlines displayed inside Happy Friends you get to see the full Twitter card display, just as it was intended to be seen on Twitter with integrated images and video. 


Happy Friends fulfils for me a true need, as with Twitter typical readers and tools (including lists) it is very difficult to track specific sources postings without doing a few click acrobatics. 


I hope that in one of the upcoming versions, the formatting of the tweets will also be improved as to make it easier for the eye to rapidly scan the information presented. The twitter grey icons on the left do to little to quiet down the noise created by all the the tweet texts and links appearing on the Happy Friends page. Vertical spacing between items and separating text from links would significantly improve legibility and rapid eye-scanning of the content.


Very useful.


Free to use.


Try it out now: http://happyfriends.camp/ 


See also: http://happy.smallpict.com/2014/06/24/welcomeToHappyFriends.html 


and: http://thenextweb.com/twitter/2014/06/28/happy-friends-turns-twitter-mailbox-select-friends/ 






Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Enterprise Social Network, Social Business & Collaboration News
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How to grow an Enterprise Social Network? - Part 1 - Ascent Blog

How to grow an Enterprise Social Network? - Part 1 - Ascent Blog | The Social Web | Scoop.it
How to introduce an Enterprise Social Network (ESN) in your organization? (How to grow an Enterprise Social Network?

Via Mumba Cloud
Stephen Dale's insight:

Some useful points here, but it all distills down to this:


"If you are on a journey to implement an Enterprise Social Network (ESN), make sure you have sponsorship from the top, a trigger to get movement, a good enough budget and the freedom to experiment."


As many people involved in developing collaborative networks have come to realise, omitting just one of those ingredients can be the difference between success and failure. 


Reading time: 4 mins.

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The Ideal Blogger's Workflow for Effectively Curating Online Content

The Ideal Blogger's Workflow for Effectively Curating Online Content | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful resources for content curator bloggers. I found the following point particularly relevant:

"Know the needs of your readers. Create and arrange your content to engage readers to be part of the conversation and learning."

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PaolaRicaurte's curator insight, June 19, 8:59 AM

An excellent perspective about blogging as content curation.

Biblio Teca's curator insight, June 20, 10:25 PM

More on CC incorporated with Blogging

 

christa appleton's curator insight, June 25, 3:18 AM

Great visual representation of blogging as curation

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Why Collaboration Often Fails

Why Collaboration Often Fails | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Collaboration is an important part of everyday work life. Yet it surprisingly doesn't always result in the best quality work.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

Some useful tips to encourage better collaboration. Encouraging to note that the author recommends "alone time", i.e.time to reflect, learn and prepare. Managers need to recognise that not all of the best work is done in teams and through collaboration. Personal knowledge development is so often overlooked. 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 5:53 PM

What's wrong with collaboration? Here are just a few issues you might run into when members of a team put their heads together.

howtoselllaptop's curator insight, September 8, 2:57 AM

cash for laptops, sell laptops

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Microsoft Cushions Google's Blows with Cash

Microsoft Cushions Google's Blows with Cash | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Yes, Google is encroaching into Microsoft’s traditional business space in a vicious productivity fight. But Google's rebranding of its Enterprise Business as Google for Work yesterday seems to be a tacit acceptance — for the moment, at least — that Microsoft is the Enterprise Daddy.Microsoft, meanwhile, has responded to Google's blows with a number of financial incentives that must have many Chief Financial Officers salivating over their ledgers. Topic: Information Management.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful summary of Microsoft's Office365 strategy and how it is positioning itself against Google's enterprise initiatives (Google for Work/Goggle Drive). Interesting to note that Apple's enterprise ambitions are not mentioned (e.g. iCloud) - I get the impression that Apple is trailing in the wake left by Google and MSoft, and are becoming more of a platform provider (e.g. iOS) than a serious competitor in the enterprise application market. As the article concludes, it's not going to be a choice between Google OR MSoft that users will have to make, but some combination of both. 


Reading time: 10mins

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Learning What We Didn’t Know

Learning What We Didn’t Know | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Before the internet we learned from institutions, friends, family and co-workers.  Learning was a process largely influenced from local resources; schools, work, communities and civic activities.  We also learned from media fed to us and media we sought in books, videos and sound.  Our resources were limited by reach, access and choices.

 

Today the resources for learning are unlimited and for the most part free. Our reach to information is unlimited and access is 24/7  which expands the venue of choices.  As a result we are all learning what we didn’t know but want to know and we are being taught by others that do know.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

Learning has left the building and people are self-organizing to learn what they didn’t know and gaining the information to know from each other and from global digital resources at the click of a mouse.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 23, 4:22 AM

Learning has left the building and people are self organizing to learn what they didn’t know and gaining the information to know from each other and from global digital resources at the click of a mouse.

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A Simple Trick for Learning New Information

A Simple Trick for Learning New Information | The Social Web | Scoop.it

A recent study in Memory & Cognition offers up an intriguing possibility about how to best learn: that learning with the expectation of teaching might be more effective than learning with the expectation that you'll be taking a test.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

An interesting experiment in learning: the study found that students achieved better results if they thought they would have to teach the topic to another student, than learning with the expectation they would be taking a test.


Perhaps the results are not too profound - if you're teaching you need to know far more about your subject than can be revealed in a test.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 20, 3:38 AM

Students in an experiment appeared to do a better job learning when they thought they'd have to teach the material in question later on.


The idea of seeking, sensing and sharing information is the cornerstone of personal knowledge mastery. 

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The Power of Knowledge Sharing

The Power of Knowledge Sharing | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Systems to manage the wealth of knowledge inside companies can help junior staff get a leg up in career advancement.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

Knowledge management systems are costly to acquire and maintain with current information. They should not be thought of as a magic wand to be waved at your organisation’s complexities. However, this study has shown evidence  that the career progression of younger and mid-level consultants can be enhanced through their use. #km

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 6, 4:50 AM

A study of a strategy consulting company shows that junior and mid-level consultants who use social information from a KM system are promoted more quickly because they are able to build a network and connect to key people in the firm.


They also had access to experts they would otherwise find difficult to approach.


That's all fine, but tying the use of a knowledge management system to career advancement is in my opinion a narrow approach.


The most important source of competitive advantage for modern organizations is its ability to find, share and act on the right knowledge. Social learning and the exchange of knowledge is not something that happens in a closed ecosystem inside the organizational boundaries. Furthermore, knowledge sharing shouldn't be considered as merely a smart career move - benefiting only egoistic 


The objective should always the creation of an adaptive organization where people connect and participate in knowledge flows. It is this opportunity to see many different perspectives, continually challenge our thinking and come up with new ideas, new approaches that will help us to become even more effective in times of change.  





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How to run a team of people who never see each other

How to run a team of people who never see each other | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Millions of people make a living without ever setting foot in an office. Particularly in technology, companies are moving away from just outsourcing rote tasks to remote workers and toward building entirely distributed teams. One leader is Elance-oDesk, the largest online marketplace for freelance talent. In addition to providing a platform for distributed and part-time work, the company...
Stephen Dale's insight:

A telecommuting option can allow access to remote workers that are more productive and easier to retain, Stanford professor Nicholas Bloom’s found when he examined a Chinese travel website which adopted the policy. Telecommuting employees also cost $1,900 less in terms of equipment and space over nine months.

 

The key to having a distributed team is to avoid creating the feeling that the employees at the main office are the real employees, and those elsewhere exist to do the work that the in-house staffers don’t feel like doing.

 

It takes extra work to include people when they aren’t physically present, and to prevent a “throw it over the wall” attitude. Regardless of whether the remote worker is on salary or a freelancer, make sure they’re included in communication, meeting, and events.

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Rescooped by Stephen Dale from Future of Work
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Information Overload: Why Brevity Is Becoming a Business Basic

Information Overload: Why Brevity Is Becoming a Business Basic | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Brevity is emerging as an essential new business basic.
In the fast-paced, multi-tasking, attention-deficit workplaces we find ourselves, getting to the point quickly matters more than ever.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article:

 

"The average person’s attention span is now only 8 seconds, and professionals are interrupted 6-7 times an hour, often unable to get back to their task at hand. More than 43 percent of us abandon complicated or lengthy emails in the first 30 seconds, and the majority of us admit ignoring half the emails we receive every day."


A useful piece on the importance of applying thought and effort on keeping your message brief whilst not losing the context. 


As Mark Twain is famously reported to have said: 


" I didn't have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead". 


 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 16, 12:31 PM

If you can’t capture your audience’s attention and deliver your message with brevity, people will disconnect with you, and it may cost you promising career opportunities. The unspoken expectation is that successful people will be masters of brevity.

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How to Avoid Collaboration Fatigue

How to Avoid Collaboration Fatigue | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Collaboration just feels right — like a big hug or a warm puppy.

But collaboration also has an overlooked dark side. 

 

Picture this: A complex issue is identified. A diverse, cross-functional team is assembled to solve it. Key stakeholders are gathered. Information is collected. Options are debated. Approval is sought. And then… nothing happens. So more information is gathered. More stakeholders are invited. More conference calls are logged. More debate ensues. More approval is sought. Round and round the project goes — when, where, and how somebody will decide, nobody knows.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

In order to avoid multiple iterations for consultation and collaboration, be clear from the start on two critical points:

 

What is the project’s purpose? 

Who will make the decision?

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 11, 7:34 AM

Advise from article: Define the purpose and designate the final decision maker before a project starts.

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Growing an Online Community: 8 Ways to Super-Charge Engagement

Growing an Online Community: 8 Ways to Super-Charge Engagement | The Social Web | Scoop.it
Learn about things that you can do to increase engagement in your private online community for customers, partners, or members.

Via Michael Norton
Stephen Dale's insight:

"....it takes engagement to make engagement" - How very true!

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Do People Choose Pain Over Boredom?

Do People Choose Pain Over Boredom? | The Social Web | Scoop.it

People are unhappy in their own company and some prefer painful experiences to their own thoughts, a new study claims.

 

 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

A symptom of the need to be continually engaged and entertained. It seems we are no longer at peace with our own minds! 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 6, 2:48 PM

The contentious paper, in the journal Science, argues we are not very good at enjoyable, recreational thought.

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Google Is About To Take Over Your Whole Life, And You Won't Even Notice

Google's new design ethos, living on and beyond every screen, could make Google an amorphous problem solver of unimaginable scale.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Google had just announced a new initiative called Material Design that promised to unify all Google products (and third-party Android apps) under a common UX language.


Material Design wants to add the intuitive feeling of physical objects in a purely digital environment. It renders all of the windows and buttons behind your screen as pieces of paper. Each piece catches light and casts shadow in a simulated 3-D space that meets your finger at the screen's glass, but this nanometer-thick wonder surface that's more capable than any material known to man. Where real paper would rip, Google's ambiguous stuff can balloon to double in size or split into two or three pieces and then recombine. Where real paper would appear dead white, Google's stuff can ripple with colours and animations.


But this technology is not stopping at making digital paper feel like a real-world experience.  It will include cloth--from table linens to stains--and liquids that ooze and bubble. According to Matius Duarte, one of the design leads, Material Design will power a living infrastructure in a world where every conceivable surface glows, shifts, and ripples, quite literally reshaping the way we communicate, learn, work, and live.


It seems we might soon have difficulty separating what we see, feel and hear in the physical world with the digital facsimiles.


Reading time: 5mins

#google #trends


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A Remarkably Simple Way To Master Social Media - Forbes

A Remarkably Simple Way To Master Social Media - Forbes | The Social Web | Scoop.it

A Remarkably Simple Way To Master Social MediaForbesThis, unfortunately, is where nearly everyone screws up on social media. By social media, I mean LinkedIn, Twitter, Slideshare, Facebook and – yes – even Forbes.


Via Baochi
Stephen Dale's insight:

Unless your job is in marketing or sales - the following holds true:


"The secret to social media success is to focus on attracting a small number of people with whom you actually wish to interact. The more you think of your “followers” as actual people, the closer you will come to using social media in a highly powerful manner."


#socmed

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