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Digital Curation Among Key Future Jobs: TheFutureShow with Gerd Leonhard

This is episode #3 of The Future Show (TFS) with Gerd Leonhard, season 1. Topics: In the future, most repetitive or machine-like tasks and jobs will be large...

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

The future of work. 

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Robin Good's curator insight, May 26, 2014 2:57 PM



Media and technology futurist Gerd Leonhard outlines his vision of the future of work given the many profound changes shaping the planet during the coming decades.


Key highlights: 


  1. We will be able to offload tedious, repetitive work to computers and robots who will replace rapidly many of our present jobs

  2. At the same time entirely new jobs will be created -
    for example:
    Digital Curation 
    Social Engineering
    Artificial Intelligence Designers 

  3. We are moving to right-brain work-jobs - that is: storytelling, emotions, creativity and imagination, negotiation 

  4. Education prepares us by having us learn things that we may need later. But in most cases we don't need those things but we rather need to know how to learn new things.

  5. More craftmanship-type of jobs like cooks, makers, hackers, coders, will fluorish as computers-machines cannot replicate such skills (yet)



Original video: http://youtu.be/X-PnJblNJng 


Full episode page: 

http://thefutureshow.tv/episode-3/ 




Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, May 27, 2014 1:40 AM

Very interesting video, but regarding point 3. that "We are moving to right-brain work-jobs" I must note there are no "right-brain" jobs. This left-right brain distinction is oversimplified neuromyth.

 

“The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction does not offer us the full picture of how creativity is implemented in the brain.* Creativity does not involve a single brain region or single side of the brain.” (http://t.co/3l5nM7IsEi)

Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, June 9, 2014 10:53 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Media and technology futurist Gerd Leonhardoutlines his vision of the future of work given the many profound changes shaping the planet during the coming decades.

 

Key highlights: 

 

We will be able to offload tedious, repetitive work to computers and robots who will replace rapidly many of our present jobs

At the same time entirely new jobs will be created - for example:
Digital Curation 
Social Engineering
Artificial Intelligence Designers 

We are moving to right-brain work-jobs - that is: storytelling, emotions, creativity and imagination, negotiation 

Education prepares us by having us learn things that we may need later. But in most cases we don't need those things but we rather need to know how to learn new things.

More craftmanship-type of jobs like cooks, makers, hackers, coders, will fluorish as computers-machines cannot replicate such skills (yet)

 

 

Original video: http://youtu.be/X-PnJblNJng ;

 

Full episode page: http://thefutureshow.tv/episode-3/ ;

 
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The Future of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes

The Future of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes | The Social Web | Scoop.it

kEveryone has different needs, and the social landscape is shifting accordingly.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Stephen Dale's insight:

"The next big thing is getting smaller and smaller."

 

"The first generation of social media touted "networking", but the next generation, raised in always-on connectivity, will embrace ephemerality and digital tribalism. Those users will abandon the major social networks and migrate to more granular mobile villages with simpler ecosystems."

I think these two statements are pretty much spot-on, and will watch with interest as Facebook (and the 'others') tries to look small while continuing to gobble-up anyone and anything that looks like it might threaten its business model. We don't need one all-consuming platform, but that not how FB shareholders view the world.

 

Interesting times ahead!

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Comunicologos.com's curator insight, April 19, 2014 4:55 PM

Mobile Tribes!

Francisco Restivo's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:15 PM

At the end, we all will find our little corners and our big windows!

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From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic

From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic | The Social Web | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful article on the  role of journalists by Jonathan Stray. He postulates that rather than writing stories, journalists should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic, by applying filtering, social curation, visualistion and interaction with their audience. I think the professional press has woken up to this, and commend the Guardian for their insightful reporting. 

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Robin Good's curator insight, October 26, 2013 1:19 PM



It's the second time that I go back to this insightful article by Jonathan Stray, dating back to 2011, but which was visionary and rightful then as it is still now. The first time I did, right after it came out, I didn't actually realize in full how relevant and important was the idea being communicated through it.


On the surface the article talks about an hypotethical Editorial Search Engine as a desirable news app. But if you look just beyond the surface, which is by itself fascinating, in essence, Mr. Stray indicates how useful and effective it would be if news publishers moved on from reporting and into 100% curated coverage of a certain topic, issue or story, opening a fascinating discovery gateway around each story and allowing in time for these streams to intersect and interconnect with each other.


By doing this, we can not only make the news much more interesting and relevant, but we can transform them into instruments for in-depth learning about anything we are interested in.


In this light the future of news could be very much about Comprehensively Informing an Audience on a Specific Topic. And if you stop enough time to re-read it and think about it, this is a pretty powerful and revolutionary concept by itself.


He specifically writes: "Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."


"Choose a topic and start with traditional reporting, content creation, in-house explainers and multimedia stories. Then integrate a story-specific search engine that gathers together absolutely everything else that can be gathered on that topic, and applies whatever niche filtering, social curation, visualization, interaction and communication techniques are most appropriate."


Jonathan Stray makes also a very inspiring connection to Jay Rosen of NYU and his idea of covering 100% of a story which in my view correctly anticipated the niche content curation trend while going beyond it in its effort to explore gateways to innovation. 

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Insightful. Visionary. Inspiring. 9/10

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Kristina Schneider's curator insight, October 26, 2013 1:36 PM

"Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."

Yes! 

Michael Britt's comment, October 27, 2013 12:27 PM
I think the points above are excellent. I only wish "content consumers" if you will, agreed with this message. I say that because I have been critisized by one consumer because he didn't feel that I gave him ENOUGH content on a topic. In other words, in many content consumer's minds, A LOT OF CONTENT = VALUE. Hopefully the public is going to realize that this is not true.
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How 3-D printing will radically change the world

How 3-D printing will radically change the world | The Social Web | Scoop.it
The rise of 3-D printing will make life as we know it today barely recognizable in 50 to 75 years. But it's not the Jetsons. Not yet.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article: "3-D printing technology is advancing at a staggering rate. American designers are now working on 3-D printed cars, while in China andHolland, 3-D printers are building entire houses. The first 3-D printed hamburger was recently created in England, heralding the possibility of a man-made food supply."


But...


The hype over 3-D printing, say technology experts, ignores the potential problems it will create. One significant problem is the legality and ethical ramifications of widespread public use. Right now, additive manufacturing (the technical term for 3-D printing) is in its "Wild West" phase, meaning, the laws have not yet caught up with the technology.

 

An example of this is 3-D printed guns. Last year, blueprints for a 3-D-printable gun, The Liberator, were posted online and downloaded some 100,000 times before the State Department ordered them taken down.


So...it's going to be a while before you can use a 3D printer to print you some new followers on social media networks...but watch this space!

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The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part II

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part II | The Social Web | Scoop.it
In the coming months and years, I expect content curation tools are going to play a very important role in many different fields.

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful summary of the current shortcomings in content curation tools and services, and what we features and innovations we might see in this developing market. From the author:

 

"In the near future it is likely that new content curation tools will provide more dedicated features for specific application and uses while becoming more aware of user needs that so far have not been taken into serious consideration (attribution, archiving, monetizing).

While large content curation hubs and platforms are likely to start realizing that their best value yet to be extracted is in the content being curated by their users, new tools will likely target more specific and professional uses rather than the general public needing simply to collect and repost content on their blog or social media channel."


Link to the full article: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part2/#ixzz2nuOEQZag

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Robin Good's curator insight, December 18, 2013 4:30 PM



Here is Part II of my look at the future of content curation tools and at what features and facilities they are likely to introduce in the coming months and years.


While In Part I I have looked at:

  • Display formats
  • Slicing & Dicing
  • Micro - Macro
  • Recurating
  • News discovery
  • Ownership
  • Credit & Attribution


In Part II I am checking out:

  • Preservation
  • Private collections
  • Full capture abilities
  • Monetization
  • Content types begging ti be curated
  • Beyond news, articles and mood boards
  • Specialized curation tools


Here's the full story: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part2/ 


See also: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part1/ 





SMOOC's curator insight, February 20, 2014 1:27 PM

Interesting write up on content curation tools from Robin Good (pt. 2)