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The Shape of Music to Come
Following digital music business and how technology, social media and e-commerce will shape the music to come.
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Coldplay and Spotify: What’s an Album Worth in 2011? « Flavorwire

Coldplay and Spotify: What’s an Album Worth in 2011? « Flavorwire | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it

"You’ve probably read recently about Coldplay’s decision to keep their new record Mylo Xyloto off insta-streaming sites like Spotify, Rdio, Rhapsody, etc. The move has led to much industry hand-wringing, and headlines like “Coldplay snub sounds alarm for streaming music.” It’s certainly an interesting choice on the part of the band and their management, and after the jump we wonder what might be behind it — and what a similar decision might mean for bands who aren’t quite the commercial juggernauts that Coldplay are. "

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EMI & EchoNest Create First Major Label "Open Sandbox" For Music Apps - hypebot

EMI & EchoNest Create First Major Label "Open Sandbox" For Music Apps - hypebot | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it
In an unusual collaboration for a large music rightsholder, EMI and The Echo Nest are working together to put thousands of EMI controlled songs, videos and other music-related content to app developers.
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How the U.S. Consumes Real-Time Entertainment Online [INFOGRAPHIC]

How the U.S. Consumes Real-Time Entertainment Online [INFOGRAPHIC] | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it
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Lessons from the Industry Formerly Known as "The Record Business" - James Barton and Brian Message - Harvard Business Review

Lessons from the Industry Formerly Known as "The Record Business" - James Barton and Brian Message - Harvard Business Review | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it

"A record company's value used to be measured by the acquisition, protection, and exploitation of copyrights. Exploiting those copyrights by selling songs is an easy business model to understand and used to be the foundation of a very healthy global industry. Historically, the record business was the heart of the music industry. Sell a lot of records and you were a successful business. And artists also succeeded through record sales: they became household names when they had sold a lot of records.
 

From the business perspective, artists and songs could be viewed as interchangeable commodities. If any given artist failed to deliver hits, another waited in the wings to take their place. This impersonal approach allowed the music industry to grow extremely profitable by simply selling "product."

But the sale of recorded music has taken a battering over the last decade, and it's no longer smart to judge an artist's commercial viability on record sales alone — not least when there is a new generation who questions the need to pay for recorded music at all. For many artists and their managers, record sales are now just one of many revenue streams and one of a number of factors with which to judge success.
 

Despite this dramatic change in the marketplace, many struggle with the concept of uncoupling success from record sales. It doesn't help that most measures — the charts by which many fans learn about new music — are still based on this notion. For emerging artists this is particularly precarious, since careers are too often ended early if a first set of recordings fail to sell.
 

So how should a "content producer" behave in this new environment? And what lessons can we learn from this new model of value?"

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How A Major Label Markets A New Artist - Music Think Tank

How A Major Label Markets A New Artist - Music Think Tank | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it

"I thought there are those out there for whom understanding this will help them become more clear in how to market their music. So the major label’s approach is two-fold:

1. When you’re unknown, make it easy for people to engage (content is free, content is everywhere).
2. When you become more popular, you can ask for more from people (content is paid, content is exclusive)."

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QR Codes Give Mixtapes A 21st Century Update @PSFK

QR Codes Give Mixtapes A 21st Century Update @PSFK | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it

"Remember mixtapes? The time and care it took to collage together a series of songs to express a very specific emotion to a very special someone? It was one of the most iconic symbolic gestures of courtship throughout the 80s and 90s. Especially when blank CDs made it easier to copy music, the idea of spending so much time putting music onto a cassette, showed you really cared. As the moribund technology of cassette players becomes increasingly rare it becomes harder to appreciate the tapes.

New innovations in sharing, listening and streaming excavate this lost art into our contemporary digital culture. UK collective Stupid have created a series of QR Code adorned greeting cards that when scanned will send the receiver a Spotify playlist. The playlist is compiled and synced to individually designed QR Codes that visually communicate the intentions of the gesture."

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Steven Levy on Facebook, Spotify and the Future of Music

Steven Levy on Facebook, Spotify and the Future of Music | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it
It's like the Second Coming! A decade ago, Napster's attempt to set music free was crushed by the record labels. Now, Facebook and Spotify (and a host of others) have resurrected the dream.
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4 formats and services that could save the music industry

4 formats and services that could save the music industry | The Shape of Music to Come | Scoop.it

"Although recent reports have pointed to a slightly less bleak outlook for digital music than may have been perceived, it’s still likely that the MP3s role as the primary source of the music industry’s digital music revenue could change in the next few years – hardly a shock when you consider what the adoption of this format and subsequent mass-piracy have done for the music business as a whole.

With that in mind let’s take a look at alternative digital formats and services which could potentially save the music industry in the future."

 

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