The Science of Le...
Follow
Find
133 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
onto The Science of Learning (and Teaching)
Scoop.it!

Can Technology Boost Our Multiple Intelligences?

Can Technology Boost Our Multiple Intelligences? | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it

"Are you addicted to Second Life? Do you enjoy debating on Facebook? Do you have your own blog? Have you ever used software to compose music or make your own video? Did you ever take a tour in an online or virtual museum? Thinking that technology cannot cater for your preferred intelligence(s)? Think again."

more...
No comment yet.
The Science of Learning (and Teaching)
What we know about the brain and how to make teaching and learning more effective.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

The Secret Benefits of a Curious Mind | Adoree Durayappah-Harrison

The Secret Benefits of a Curious Mind | Adoree Durayappah-Harrison | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
It’s no surprise that when we are curious about something, it makes it easier to learn. But cutting-edge research published in the academic journal Neuron provides startling evidence for how a curious state of mind improves learning and memory for things we are not even interested in.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

What We’ve Learned from Three Years of MOOCs | MIT Technology Review

What We’ve Learned from Three Years of MOOCs | MIT Technology Review | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Online education offers one effective way to close the skills gap.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D. from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

Challenges for Regional Undergraduate Universities in “the Middle”

Challenges for Regional Undergraduate Universities in “the Middle” | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
How Can a Regional Undergraduate Institution Really Stand Out for Teaching and Learning?

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
more...
Ryan Rejaei's curator insight, December 18, 9:59 AM

"CIS120 Ryan Rejaei"

Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

The Myth of the Brain Game

The Myth of the Brain Game | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Puzzles designed to sharpen mental acuity may not actually do much to improve memory or intelligence in the long run.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Boost Your Memory by Testing Yourself, Not Re-Reading

Boost Your Memory by Testing Yourself, Not Re-Reading | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
There's a reason why practice tests are so effective. If you need to memorize something quickly for a presentation or interview, create a list of questions and test yourself to boost your memory.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

How The Brain Works--And How Students Can Respond

How The Brain Works--And How Students Can Respond | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Although the brain is an amazing organ, it’s not equipped to process the billions of bits of information that bombard it every second. Filters in your brain protect it from becoming overloaded. These filters control the information flow so that only approximately 2,000 bits of information per second enter the brain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

A Visual Primer On Learning Theory

A Visual Primer On Learning Theory | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Theories on how people learn are not new. Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky, Skinner and others have theorized for years how it is we come to “know” things.

Unlike many theories involving physics for example, it is unlikely that a single learning theory is “right,” and will ultimately prove other theories “wrong.” How people learn is complex, and any unifying theory on how it all happens that’s entirely accurate would likely be too vague to be helpful. In that way, each “theory” is more of a way to describe one truth out of many.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Learning Theories: Jerome Bruner On The Scaffolding Of Learning -

Learning Theories: Jerome Bruner On The Scaffolding Of Learning - | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Bruner’s theory of scaffolding emerged around 1976 as a part of social constructivist theory, and was particularly influenced by the work of Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky. Vygotsky argued that we learn best in a social environment, where we construct meaning through interaction with others. His Zone of Proximal Development theory, where we can learn more in the presence of a knowledgeable other person, became the template for Bruner’s model.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience-based eLearning Tips

Neuroscience-based eLearning Tips | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.'s insight:

Free eBook: Neuroscience-based eLearning tips --Remember, you cannot argue with your brain. It follows its own rules. You can force it to do things, but that’s going to be a big challenge. For optimal learning, what your learners need most is brain-friendly content. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Chapter 4

Chapter 4 | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
As we learn and develop mastery of a skill, our level of expertise grows and changes with our ability to know when and how to use that knowledge.  In the book How Learning Works (Ambrose, Bridges, Lovett, DiPietro, and Norman, 2010), we learn that for novices to be pushed to the next level, we must present them with information and tasks that requires them to use the skills to the point of autonomy as well as figure out how to transfer what they have learned to new situations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Left Brain vs. Right: It's a Myth, Research Finds

Left Brain vs. Right: It's a Myth, Research Finds | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
The idea that some people are "left-brained," meaning they are highly analytical, while others are "right-brained," or more creative, is not true, according to a new study that looked at brain scans of more than 1,000 people.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D. from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Assessment, Choice, and the Learning Brain

Assessment, Choice, and the Learning Brain | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
The growing field of educational neuroscience, converging developmental psychology, cognitive science, and education, can help teachers and school leaders rethink how they approach assessments. While some of its initial findings merely support what educators have intuitively believed, it is also challenging many assumptions and providing new insight into best educational practices, especially regarding assessment.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 29, 3:51 PM

Assessments-- high stakes testing in particular, have changed the learning environments of classrooms across the country. 


This insightful article may help everyone gain a better understanding of what the research says about teaching and learning.

ajinugraha's curator insight, November 1, 12:13 AM

http://manfaatbuahdansayuran.oherbal.net/2014/11/01/manfaat-bawang-merah-untuk-berbagai-penyakit/

Vanessa Monell Mercado's curator insight, November 2, 7:41 AM

I want to do a PhD on Educational Neuroscience, any suggestions? Not for the money, but for the learning and helping educators part!

Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Here's How Study Breaks Boost Learning

Here's How Study Breaks Boost Learning | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it

Students in school are rarely given opportunities to rest and reflect on the knowledge they've acquired, but a new study suggests that giving the mind a little targeted downtime could be a highly effective way to boost learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Brain Science: Are Learning Styles Valid? by Art Kohn : Learning Solutions Magazine

Brain Science: Are Learning Styles Valid? by Art  Kohn : Learning Solutions Magazine | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
During the last 30 years, the notion of learning styles has become popular in corporate training and a substantial industry has emerged to help organizations apply these principles. This month, we will explore the concept of learning styles and examine the evidence about its pedagogical effectiveness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Do ‘Brain Training’ Games Work? It Depends on Which Scientists You Ask – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Do ‘Brain Training’ Games Work? It Depends on Which Scientists You Ask – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Just two months after a group of neuroscientists criticized commercially available brain games, a different group of scientists released an open letter on Wednesday saying the products do show promise.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Here's Why Writing Things Out By Hand Makes You Smarter

Here's Why Writing Things Out By Hand Makes You Smarter | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it

Typing is fast.  Handwriting is slow. Weirdly, that's precisely why handwriting is better suited to learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

What Your "Working Memory" Does (and How to Give It a Tune-Up)

What Your "Working Memory" Does (and How to Give It a Tune-Up) | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Working memory is like your brain's scratch pad, managing information as you go about your day. But our routine deluge of information can make us feel scatterbrained, like our working memory has too much to deal with. Here's how to tune-up your working memory and stay focused.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

9 Ways Neuroscience Has Changed The Classroom

9 Ways Neuroscience Has Changed The Classroom | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
There is often a big divide between what happens in the laboratory and the way laboratory findings are practically applied. The relationship between neuroscience research and education is no exception. While there are numerous educational products that claim to be based on neuroscience research (often quite dubiously so), the real impact of brain-based research on education has been much more subtle.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Rhizomatic Learning Is A Metaphor For How We Learn

Rhizomatic Learning Is A Metaphor For How We Learn | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Rhizomatic learning takes another approach.

It freely admits the beautiful complexity of the human experience, and thus, by proximity, the sheer craziness of the learning process. This idea, not so much a learning theory as it is a clever and accurate metaphor, describes learning as having no beginning nor an end. It posits that learners have needs so diverse that the “teacher” is essentially off the hook in meeting every need for every student, no matter how noble that sounds.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Learning Theories: Double-Loop Learning

Learning Theories: Double-Loop Learning | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Argyris bases his theory on the premise that each of us has a cognitive map inside our heads – in other words, a mental script to deal with problems and challenges based on previous experience. Working with others including Donald Schon, Argyris developed this idea into a theory of learning. We live and work in a mode of ‘detection and correction of error’.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Socratic Questioning: 30 Thought-Provoking Questions to Ask Your Students - InformED

Socratic Questioning: 30 Thought-Provoking Questions to Ask Your Students - InformED | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Rothestein and his colleagues are trying to tell us something very important: In the 21st century, we can no longer afford to ignore the strategies that promote critical thinking and problem solving skills. It’s time for a thorough examination of what makes a good question, and how students can benefit from staying curious.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

The Most Basic Things eLearning Professionals Need to Know About Learning

The Most Basic Things eLearning Professionals Need to Know About Learning | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
Understanding how the mind processes information and stores it is vital to educators, instructional designers and eLearning professionals. Simply stated, if you don’t know how the mind works, you have no way of knowing how to design material that will ensure success for your students. Information processing theory is a subject that has been studied, discussed and debated so much that a lot of the information available conflicts. However, there are a few basic principles that are generally agreed upon.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Stanford researchers bridge education and neuroscience to strengthen the growing field of educational neuroscience

Stanford researchers bridge education and neuroscience to strengthen the growing field of educational neuroscience | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
As methods of imaging the brain improve, neuroscientists and educators can now identify changes in children's brains as they learn, and start to develop ways of personalizing instruction for kids who are falling behind.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

All in the mind? The role of neuroscience in education

All in the mind? The role of neuroscience in education | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
There is no agreement on whether studying the way the brain works can help improve educational outcomes, but the discussion is a hot topic amongst educational experts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Scoop.it!

Understand neuroscience with these neat animations by Harvard University

Understand neuroscience with these neat animations by Harvard University | The Science of Learning (and Teaching) | Scoop.it
When I first heard of Harvard's Fundamentals of Neuroscience online course, I thought it was going to be so hard to understand that I would have a seizure before the end of the first video. But no, thanks to the cool and straightforward animation it is actually very easy to get it.
more...
No comment yet.