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FINALLY, Scrapping Performance Appraisals for What Motivates!

FINALLY, Scrapping Performance Appraisals for What Motivates! | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it
Something big is going on. More and more companies have decided to radically change their performance appraisal process.



...Adobe, Juniper, Kelly Services, and a variety of other companies ...have decided to do away with traditional performance ratings and dramatically change the annual appraisal process.

Excerpts


The new keys to success:


  • Develop a “feedback-rich” culture and set of tools (often online, sometimes formal, often informal) that encourages all employees to give each other feedback. 
    
  • Talk about performance regularly and let employees create their own goals on a regular basis. 
  
  • [Ensure] managers provide ongoing feedback and teach them how to have honest conversations.
   
  • Assume that employees already know something about their own performance, and [help them] them self-assess. ...That starts the dialogue about expectations and the match between their self-assessment and that of the organization.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

IS this slow moving change finally taking hold?!  From a Chris Lee article on problematic appraisal in the 90's ot Coen's & Jenkins "Abolishing Appraisals" book in 2002, finally the death bell may be ringing.


More than a decade later, there is hope for corporations abandoning this deeply flawed corporate millstone in exchange for a healthier, feedback rich and goal/challenge driven culture.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 10, 2013 1:58 PM

It's time for performance management to fade and for positive talent development systems to move forward.  As an example of this, Skillrater.com has arrived on the scene, integrated into social media and positive feedback practices.  More news and scoops to follow.  ~  Deb

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The Secret of Effective Motivation, One Type of Motivation is Better Than Two, Research Results

The Secret of Effective Motivation, One Type of Motivation is Better Than Two, Research Results | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

"New research supports encouraging people to do something for its own sake, not for its benefits.  It will make a difference in their success."


____________________
   
Surely two motives are better than one.  New research ...suggests {two] can actually be counterproductive to success.

____________________


What mix of motives — internal or instrumental or both — is most conducive to success?   …Surely two motives are better than one.  New research published in a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that instrumental motives are not always an asset and can actually be counterproductive to success.
 

The authors give examples including data drawn from 11,320 cadets in nine entering classes at the United States Military Academy at West Point showing that years later those with strong internal motives but weak instrumental ones were less likely to graduate, less outstanding as military officers and less committed to staying in the military.
 

There are many implications for educators as well as any of us seeking make sense of the work we do each day.  Focusing on the meaning and impact of work, rather than on, say, the financial returns it will bring, may be the best way to improve not only the quality of a person’s work but also — counterintuitive though it may seem —financial success.

Related posts & tools by Deb:

  

          

    

 

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Two strong motives = less success?  This motivation research has many implications for education, work coaching as well as career counseling and coaching.

I've also posted recently about the duty of doing work - and finding work that is a good fit for your interests and skills starting at the point of choice, if choice is available, for long term success.    ~  Deb


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10 Ways To Do What You Don't Want To Do, with a Zen Flair

10 Ways To Do What You Don't Want To Do, with a Zen Flair | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

Telling yourself to suck it up and get working doesn't always go as planned. Stop avoiding the inevitable with these tricks in getting dreaded tasks...


A sample of the 10 strategies:


1. MEDITATE ON WHY YOU NEED TO DO THIS.

Instead of giving in to distraction, sit there for a minute....Dig deeper and find the good that you’re creating in the world. 


3. LET GO OF YOUR IDEAL.

Let go of the fantasy, the ideal, the expectation. And just embrace reality: this task before you, nothing else.


4. INTENTION, NOT RESULTS.

Why are you doing it? If it’s to make the life of a loved one better, then that’s your intention. That intention is true no matter what the result is. Focus on this, not what bad things might or might not happen.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

          

               

                 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Leo Babauta's  strategies,  from his blog, Zen Habits, ring true to this neophyte meditation student for how to get past the roadblocks.  Worth a read through.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 3:41 PM

This list of strategies is a meditatively-enhanced procrastination buster. Worth a read through to break through your productivity roadblocks.  ~  D

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Spurring Motivation with a "Think Board"

Spurring Motivation with a "Think Board" | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

Small wins every day
...Seek out that perfectly clear, concise, motivating nugget of wisdom. ....Whenever I find myself searching for that excellent tweet-sized motivation, I turn to my Think Board.


Author:  Jordan Rappaport is an International Strategist for Bank of America, one of the largest financial services companies in the country. His interests include technology, entrepreneurship, and motivational techniques. 


Related posts & tools by Deb:


     

      


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Great ideas for 2014, spurring motivation in the new year.


A motivation quote for today in 2014:

"I failed my way to success."  ~  Thomas Edison


Keep the dream alive!  Happy New Year to you and yours. ~  Deb

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simondcollins's curator insight, January 24, 10:29 AM

These can be used as great staff success boards too!

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Presentation & Motivation Zen: Sir Ken Robinson Gives Best Talk Yet, TED & Education

Presentation & Motivation Zen: Sir Ken Robinson Gives Best Talk Yet, TED & Education | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

Creativity and education expert Sir Ken Robinson delivered two amazingly popular TED Talks prior to his newest, and what could be his best to date in 2013.


Excerpted from a Garr Reynolds post:


_________________________
   
Good presentation is a balance of information, persuasion, and inspiration... [to] light a spark and point the way.

     

_________________________

    

His first talk http://bit.ly/1fjhkH6 —presented sans multimedia in the true Sir Ken Robinson style — was made in 2006 and is the most viewed TED talk of all time.


His follow-up talk given in 2010 http://bit.ly/1f6zZp2 also has been downloaded millions of times.


I have seen Sir Ken speak many times and he is always inspiring and engaging, but his latest TED talk, http://bit.ly/IEXH0Q presented at TED Talks Education in April of this year, is my favorite yet.

  • Good presentation is a balance of information, persuasion, and inspiration
  • Presentations related to leadership must necessarily light a spark and point the way

  

Sir Ken does not scream or jump up and down but he nonetheless ignites, provokes, and inspires his live audience, and anyone else who cares to listen to his presentation on line, in a meaningful and memorable way.


Millions of people have seen his latest talk, but just in case you have not, please set aside about 20 minutes to watch this outstanding, short TED talk."

 


Via John Evans, juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sir Ken inspires us with humor, penetrating observations, and connects with our intrinsic motivation, which is why this post is here representing the  art of motivation, in action.  It has also been shared Agile Learning because of the education focus.   ~  Deb

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simondcollins's curator insight, January 20, 6:11 AM

The brilliant Sir Ken Robinson.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 20, 1:51 PM

Sir Ken is always a good listen and viewing.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, January 22, 5:57 PM

Fabulous presenter making some excellent points about education.

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Drivers of Beliefs and Motivation in America, Classic to Current

Drivers of Beliefs and Motivation in America, Classic to Current | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

Can you define the heavy influence of place, ethnicity and culture on our beliefs, motivation and behaviors as Americans?  


"..most people cannot tell you much about regional differences..."


The author focuses on current issues of gun control, stand-your-ground laws and other violence related 2012-2013 topics, as well as political, social issues.


________________________
   
Among the eleven regional cultures, there are two superpowers [who] ...shape continental debate: Yankeedom and Deep South.

   

____________________________

       

From the book, American Nations, by Colin Woodard, 2011
        

YANKEEDOM -  Founded by Calvinists as a new Zion, social engineering, denial of self for the common good, and assimilation of outsiders. Prizes education and broad citizen participation in politics and government to guard against aristocrats and tyrants. Full of cities and towns.

      

NEW NETHERLAND - Dutch roots, materialistic, tolerant, defends public institutions and rejects evangelical prescriptions for individual behavior. More interested in making money than in Yankee moralizing.

       

THE MIDLANDS. Founded by English Quakers,  open-minded and less inclined toward activist government than Yankeedom.  (Others describe as personally moral but indifference to social corruption and military violence.) 

     

TIDEWATER. English gentry roots, semi-feudal, respects authority and tradition, tends to devalue equality or public participation in politics.   Barely any towns — planters delivered supplies to estates up Chesapeake’s tributaries.  Once ruled supreme but was hemmed in and saw its clout fade.

      

GREATER APPALACHIA. Irish, English, Scottish roots, lampooned as hillbilly and redneck haven, warrior ethic, personal sovereignty and individual liberty. Shifts alliances depending on who is the greatest threat to their freedom. 

      

DEEP SOUTH. Via English slave lords from Barbados, has a West Indies–style slave society roots. Classical Republicanism, democracy = privilege of the few, caste systems, fights against expanded federal powers, taxes and environmental, labor and consumer regulations.  A McCain stronghold.

      

EL NORTE. The oldest, borderlands of the Spanish American empire, Hispanic language and culture dominate. Norteños = independence, self-sufficiency, adaptabilility, and focus on work. Encompasses parts of Mexico.

      

THE LEFT COAST. “New England on the Pacific,” a hybrid of Yankee idealism and Appalachian self-expression and exploration—products range from the Summer of Love to the iPad. Ally of Yankeedom clashes with Far Western sections.  

      

THE FAR WEST. Shaped more by environment than ethnic factors.  High, dry and remote made habitable  by railroads and mining, dams, and irrigation systems directed by corporations headquartered in New York, Boston, Chicago, or San Francisco, or by the federal government.  Their senators fight against trusts and, of late, federal government, rather than corporate masters.

       

NEW FRANCE. Combo of northern French peasantry and natives of northwestern North America. Down-to-earth, egalitarian, and consensus driven, very tolerant attitudes toward gays and people of all races.  Readily accepts government involvement in the economy. Manifests in Canada, where multiculturalism and negotiated consensus are treasured.

    

FIRST NATION. Native American groups that retained their land and cultural practices and knowledge and survive in this challenging region on their own terms. Stands on the threshold of full independence. Liberalism traces to the first fur traders.   Huge—larger than the continental USA—but population under 300,000, most of live in Canada.

      

"Among the eleven regional cultures, there are two superpowers, nations with the identity, mission, and numbers to shape continental debate: Yankeedom and Deep South. For more than two hundred years, they’ve fought for control of the federal government and, in a sense, the nation’s soul."

    


Related posts & tools by Deb:

              

    

             

           

          


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Understanding place is important to understand culture and motivation. Here are four books (of many) mentioned in reviews on this topic:
     

Cultural regions of the United States (1975)
by Raymond D Gastil

     

Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (America: A Cultural History) (1989) David Hackett Fischer

Analysis of the four “British folkways” in America

      
The Nine Nations of North America  (1981) by Joel Garreau

A study of what came to be simplified as the USA red-blue split

      

American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America  (2011) by Colin Woodard

Delves into history, building on David H. Fischer’s work.

     

~  Deb

 

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Photographs Can Boost Your Happiness, Creativity and Motivation

Photographs Can Boost Your Happiness, Creativity and Motivation | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

"Cameras and phones have evolved to make taking photos so much easier.  ...Now I realize the role they can play in happiness."


Excerpted:

1. Photos remind us of the people, places, and activities we love.


5. Photographs allow you to curate things you love. Taking a picture is a way to “claim” something. On Pinterest, I love to add things to my From the Ministry of Happiness board. It’s a way to make a collection without having to buy or cope with anything.

6. Taking photos fosters creativity


Related posts & tools by Deb:

              

    

             


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Though this is about happiness, photography can also be an element of the art of motivation.  Think of capturing a photo of highly meaningful, successful projects and events or milestones.


    These can make a real difference in showing a positive legacy of achievement.   ~  Deb

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    Sharrock's comment, May 1, 3:16 PM
    Deb, that's an interesting connection. Touchstones can be powerful for capturing emotions and intents that are connected to accomplishments and meaningful (very full of meaning) moments.
    Sharrock's curator insight, May 1, 3:17 PM
    Deb made a powerful connection. Touchstones can be powerful for capturing emotions and intents that are connected to accomplishments and meaningful (very full of meaning) moments.  
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    Motivation of Needs & Wants: 5 Strong Emotional Marketing Triggers for Why We Buy

    Motivation of Needs & Wants:  5 Strong Emotional Marketing Triggers for Why We Buy | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

    Our emotions trigger us to buy.   ...Needs are driven by logic while wants are driven by emotions. 


    ...What teenager really needs a cell phone or $200 pair of jeans? Who needs your product? People buy because they want it. Every day we buy things we want instead of things we need.


    Excerpts:
    Here are five of our strongest emotions that control much of the choices we make. If you understand the emotional reasons why your customers buy from you then you can begin to trigger these emotions in your prospects and customers. 

    Love 
    What do your customers love? ...partner, family, pets, business, career, culture, hobbies, books, personal time...We do strange things when in love and in the name of love. 


    Pride 
    ...Why does your neighbor buy a bigger screen TV than yours? How did you feel when you first drove home with that new car? ...Who and what are you proud of? And what would you do to show and protect that pride? 

    Guilt 
    ... "Is guilt the real driver behind the spending for Christmas, Valentines and Mothers' Day?" ...Are you guilty of not tapping into your prospects' emotions - and missing sales? 

    Fear 
    This may be our most powerful driver. It is likely this emotion more than any other has helped humanity to survive. ...What fear might motivate your prospect to buy from you? Will not buying expose them to risk, missed opportunities or embarrassment? 


    Greed 
    From...Peter Urs Bender, "Sell to the greedy, not the needy". The greedy want more and they will pay for it.   ...If you want to help the needy, give to charity.  



    Photo by r e n a t a, Flickr cc

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Do you agree that all buying is emotional?  

    Emotions are also central to performance as cited in a classic article, "Escape from the Red Zone" excerpted here in the Talent & Performance Development curation stream.   ~  Deb

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    Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue? ~ Motivation to Strive ~ Classic

    Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue? ~ Motivation to Strive ~ Classic | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

    The very act of making decisions depletes our ability to make them well. So how do we navigate a world of endless choice?

    The three prisoners had completed at least two-thirds of their sentences, but the parole board granted freedom to only one of them.

    Guess which one:

    • Case 1 (heard at 8:50 a.m.): An Arab Israeli serving a 30-month sentence for fraud.
        
    • Case 2 (heard at 3:10 p.m.): A Jewish Israeli serving a 16-month sentence for assault.
       
    • Case 3 (heard at 4:25 p.m.): An Arab Israeli serving a 30-month sentence for fraud.


    The odds favored the prisoner who appeared at 8:50 a.m. — and he did in fact receive parole. But even though the other Arab Israeli prisoner was serving the same sentence for the same crime — fraud — the odds were against him when he appeared (on a different day) at 4:25 in the afternoon. He was denied parole, as was the Jewish Israeli prisoner at 3:10 p.m, whose sentence was shorter than that of the man who was released.


    They were just asking for parole at the wrong time of day.

    ...which phase of the decision-making process was most fatiguing? 


    ....Once you’re mentally depleted, you become reluctant to make trade-offs, which involve a particularly advanced and taxing form of decision making....

    Spears and other researchers argue that this sort of decision fatigue is a major — and hitherto ignored — factor in trapping people in poverty. Because their financial situation forces them to make so many trade-offs, they have less willpower to devote to school, work and other activities that might get them into the middle class. It’s hard to know exactly how important this factor is, but there’s no doubt that willpower is a special problem for poor people.  

     
     
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This research from 2011 is still very current today in this thorough New York Times article, including references to business, legal and personal striving (escaping poverty) decisions.  ~  D

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    No More Criticism, No Advice: Emotions Drive Achievement & Performance ~ Classic

    No More Criticism, No Advice:  Emotions Drive Achievement & Performance ~ Classic | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

    A classic current article: "Peter Naylor and Claire Crittenden have a revolutionary approach for confronting the business world's last taboo: emotion.


    Excerpts:


    People are motivated by either "red" emotions -- anger, fear, greed -- or "green" emotions -- genuine enthusiasm and confidence. Either ...gets results. Yet one set of emotions ...slowly destroys people; the other can actually improve people's quality of life.


    __________________________


    Flattery, advice, criticism, and motivation rob workers of their freedom and ignore the...emotional current ...between manager and subordinate," ...grounded in feelings of subjugation.

    __________________________


    ...All organizations in the contemporary world manipulate emotion, warp it, force it into the red zone...A few, and only a few, are struggling to get well.


    ...Their alternative model for organizational life and the politics of emotion has simple ground rules: No flattery. No advice. No criticism. No motivation whatsoever. No telling people how to do their jobs -- outside of a genuine training environment. Never. At all. Period.


    ...Flattery, advice, criticism, and motivation rob workers of their freedom and ignore the essential emotional current that runs through encounters between manager and subordinate," Naylor says. Nine times out of ten, that emotional current is red: a Molotov cocktail of anger and fear, grounded in feelings of subjugation.


    _______________________
     

    If you do this over a period of time -- design and validation -- people will be transformed."

    _______________________



    ..."Somebody inside us knows it won't work. We're devastating ourselves and others. The problem is, people don't want to be responsible. But when you give advice, who now has the responsibility? Anyone here ever heard of empowerment? If you do this over a period of time -- design and validation -- people will be transformed."



    Related posts & tools by Deb:

                  

        

                 

                     


      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This is a classic article from the 90's who time has come.  You've probably heard that all buying is emotional?   This article brings it into the heart of organizational, team and personal performance.  It's a revolutionary approach that needs a wider audience.  Hopefully, it will get one.   


      I found the article because I had been searching for the "fire hydrants" story for awhile.  I remembered reading it in the 90s.  The trail led me back to find this FastTimes article.  ~  Deb

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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:24 PM

      This classic article from the 1997 is worth a second look today.  The connection to brain science is very current.

      I also think emotion and beliefs / the spiritual are both the last taboos in business  (belief / the spiritual via an example in  Theory U and Otto Scharmer.)   


      I've also posted this piece on my Motivation curation stream.   It's relevant for anyone who has a work relationship with anyone else.

       ~  Deb

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      The 32 Hour Workweek Thrashes the Cult of Overwork

      The 32 Hour Workweek Thrashes the Cult of Overwork | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      The cult of overwork is the prevailing belief that the more hours people work, the better for the company. That notion...dead wrong,


      From Arlie Hochschild’s book The Time Bind demonstrates: 


      When demand for a product is down, normally a company fires some people and makes the rest work twice as hard. So we put it to a vote of everyone in the plant. We asked them what they wanted to do: layoffs for some workers or thirty-two-hour workweeks for everyone. They thought about it and decided they’d rather hold the team together. So we went down to a thirty-two-hour-a-week schedule for everyone furing a down time. We took everybody’s hours and salary down – executives too.


      But Doug Strain, the vice chairman of ESI, a computer company in Portland Oregon, discovered two surprises.


      First, productivity did not decline. I swear to God we get as much out of them at thirty-two hours as we did at forty. So it’s not a bad business decision. But second, when economic conditions improved, we offered them one hundred percent time again. No one wanted to go back!




      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      The ESI group is stilll going strong today in 2013, with multiple locations listed on their website.

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      Expanding Motivation Bandwidth to Escape the Cycle of Scarcity

      Expanding Motivation Bandwidth to Escape the Cycle of Scarcity | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it
      The bad decisions of the poor, says a new book, are not a product of bad character or low intelligence. They are a product of poverty itself


      Mullainathan and Shafir write that the same mentality of scarcity that applies to the cash-poor also applies to people who are overly busy and those who are dieting.


      People short of time also tunnel, borrowing time by postponing projects that are tomorrow’s emergency but not today’s. And being hungry captures the mind in a way similar to being poor. People who are on strict diets spend a lot of their bandwidth thinking about food.

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Reviewed by a Pulitzer Prize writer, this book review of "Scarcity" gives a new meaning to tunnel vision, that could affect the motivation and planning of anyone, at any time.  ~ Deb

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      High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio

      High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it
      It's the secret to high-performing teams -- and strong marriages.


      The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company.



      ________________________

      The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams..
      .was the ratio of positive comments to negative comments...nearly six (6) positive comments for every (1) negative one.

      ________________________


      "Effectiveness" was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.

      The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments

      • ("I agree with that," for instance, or "That's a terrific idea") 

      to negative comments 

      • ("I don't agree with you" "We shouldn't even consider doing that") that the participants made to one another. 
      The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6 (that is, nearly six positive comments for every negative one).

      The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9 (almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones.)

      _________________________

      ..Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.
      _________________________

      But the average for the low-performing teams, at 0.36 to 1, was almost three negative comments for every positive one.

      ...Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.

      Perhaps that's why we have found with the vast majority of the leaders in our database, who have no outstanding weaknesses, that positive feedback is what motivates them to continue improvement. In fact, for those in our database who started above average already (but are still below the 80th percentile), positive feedback works like negative feedback did for the bottom group.

      Focusing on their strengths enabled 62% of this group to improve a full 24 percentage points (to move from the 55th to the 79th percentile). 

             
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This refers to some classic research from M. Losada & Heaphy on connectivity in high performance teams.  This research about positive and critiquing feedback ratios (and the volume of the positive feedback) seems right on target from the 1998 studies.  ~  Deb

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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:25 PM

      First scooped to the Art and Science of Motivation, it also belongs in the Performance category.  Enjoy! ~  Deb

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      Top 10 Ways to Destroy Motivation at Work

      Top 10 Ways to Destroy Motivation at Work | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      Want to know how to destroy motivation at work? These key factors, attitudes, and behaviors destroy motivation at work. It doesn't have to be that way. 


      A sample from the list of 10:

      •  Make rules for the many because of the behavior of a few. Organizations need policies and rules to create a legal, ethical, effective workplace. They do not need a policy to solve every problem. 


      • Focus on mistakes and errors no matter how trivial they are in comparison with successes.
        This is especially a problem at weekly meetings and during periodic performance evaluations. Managers must provide balanced feedback, but let’s get real. If an employee is making mistakes most of the time, why not fire the employee? The job must be a terrible fit for the employee’s skills and capabilities. To dwell only on problem areas destroys the employee’s confidence and self-esteem, makes the employee more error-prone, and makes your organization wonder why they promoted you to management.


      • Hold meetings, coaching sessions, and performance reviews in which the manager does the majority of the talking.
        Only a rare employee will find a work environment in which he or she is talked at motivating. But, it happens frequently. Even in organizations that encourage employee involvement, managers are not always skilled at discussing performance with employees. The manager may be afraid that if he stops talking, the employee will make demands he can’t fulfill. The manager may


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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 31, 2013 12:00 AM

      This is leaning gently toward distributed, groups and teams.  We'll see what's next.  Do you agree?

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      Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

      Think like an Entrepreneur:  Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      "How do you  FRAME an approach to entrepreneurial change that helps you adapt to a business climate that continues to evolve?"


      So many things change quickly in the work world that it helps us to polish our natural abilities toward adaptive change, learning from nature as featured in the SlideShare included in this post:
       

      The five (5) FRAME concepts for this presentation are:

      1.  Fail Small, Learn Big

      2. Reinvent  Continuously,  Use an Internal  & External Mindset

      3. Anti-fragile:  “I Embrace  Randomness & the VUCA”    The Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous   (See more about VUCA here.)

      4.  Multi-Networks

      5.  Entrepreneurs Create The Future



      The fifth concept about entrepreneurs creating the future is one of the most important.  Professor Saras D. Sarasvathy talks about the importance of taking action, pushing through early failure, and eventually being successful due to perseverance and effectuation, a set of principles that she teaches that does not begin with a specific goal.

      Indeed, goals sometimes trap us or limit us greatly.  Instead, effectuation uses the resources at hand and allows goals to emerge over time from the varied  imagination and diverse aspirations of an entrepreneurial founder and the people with whom they interact.

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This is my own, new blog post with an included Slideshare on two favorite subjects:  Entrepreneurs and Anti-Fragile  (adapting to change, becoming more than resilient.)   See if you agree with any of the 5 concepts listed above.  Let me know what you'd like to see in any follow-up handout via the comments on the original post here.   Thanks, ~  Deb

      more...
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 25, 6:07 AM

      This is my own, new blog post with an included Slideshare on two favorite subjects:  Entrepreneurs and Anti-Fragile  (adapting to change, becoming more than resilient.)   See if you agree with any of the 5 concepts listed above.  Let me know what you'd like to see in any follow-up handout via the comments on the original post here.   Thanks, ~  Deb

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      7 Ways Olympians Stay Motivated, The Research

      7 Ways Olympians Stay Motivated, The Research | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      Some of the most successful athletes aren’t necessarily the strongest or fastest, but simply the ones who are best at staying motivated.  ...Mindfulness, self-talk, and an obscure chunk of the brain help elite athletes get through the training grind.


      “A lot of times before you physically give out, you give out mentally,” said Thomas Hong, a high-school student and speed skater who placed 11th at the Olympic trials this year. 
       

      ….Drawing from interviews and psychological studies of athletes, here are seven ways Olympians stay motivated through the training slog.
           

      Excerpts:
         
      1. Talk yourself through the stress

      In 1993, researchers interviewed 17 national champion figure skaters and identified 158 unique coping strategies they used. The most common, used by 76 percent of the skaters, was “rational thinking and self-talk,” which the study authors describe as logically examining all of the potential stressors, determining what could be controlled, and talking oneself through the problem rationally.

          
      2. Love—or at least accept—the grind

      Studies of college-age swimmers and professional rugby players have shown… the biggest factor in predicting burnout was the athlete’s own devaluation of the sport—caring about it less or attributing negative qualities to it.

      Successful athletes were repeatedly described as being intrinsically motivated and “loving” their practice, not just their competitions.

          
      3. Be optimistic

      Yes, it’s a cliche. But in a 2002 study …of 10 Olympic medalists and their coaches…described the athlete in question as “optimistic/positive.”


      4. Anticipate things before they occur

      Becoming a Navy SEAL requires swimming for 50 meters without taking a breath. One trainer realized that the SEAL-aspirants who are most likely to have trouble with this task are the ones who get intimidated ...before they even try. So, he began telling them to focus on executing each stroke individually instead of the entire, 50-meter stretch.
          

      "That re-calibrates the brain to pay attention to the body's moment-by-moment change," ...[so that]...some of these guys do much better….
           

      5. Stick with a coach who’s more like South, not North, Korea
      Unsurprisingly, the coach ...matters almost as much as the athlete. In a 2000 study, Division I athletes were shown to be more motivated when the coaches were neither too easygoing nor hard-charging—they reinforced consistently, but with a democratic style of instruction.

          

      6. Try mindfulness
      Mindfulness is loosely defined as the nonjudgmental focus of attention on an experience as it occurs. Some researchers think being mindful helps athletes achieve a state of flow, or feeling fully immersed in an activity.
       

      Elite golfers who had been trained in mindfulness techniques, such as greater awareness of breathing or accepting emotions without judgment, all increased their national rankings, compared with only two golfers in the control group.

      Read more here:  
       

      Related tools & posts by Deb:

               

      • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

          

          

          

           

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      These strategies ring true from readings in business literature as well as sports and military success.  It's encouraging to read about mindfulness & flow, which will hopefully encourage those writing job descriptions to remove the inane "multi-tasking" expectations. Good work requires focus - not multi-tasking, on what really creates great performance and motivation.  ~  Deb

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      Pioneer Motivation Researchers: Self-Determination by Deci & Ryan

      Pioneer Motivation Researchers:  Self-Determination by Deci & Ryan | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      “Deci and Ryan...are the sun around which all this other research orbits,” Pink says. “They’re true pioneers. Forty years from now, we’ll look back on them as two of the most important social scientists of our time.”


      What motivates us? How do we get motivated? And why do we describe some people as motivated and others not?


      ________________________
         
      ....we are most deeply engaged, and that we do our most creative work, when we feel that we are acting according to our own will on behalf of goals we find meaningful.

      ________________________
          

          

      Deci and Ryan [wrote] Intrinsic Motivation and Self-Determination in Human Behavior (1985). In their pathbreaking work, they articulated self-determination theory, a comprehensive repudiation of behaviorist orthodoxy regarding human motivation.


      ...[T]he theory...maintains that motivation develops from within us...grounded in  “competency, autonomy, and relatedness.” Self-determination theory (SDT) holds that we are most deeply engaged, and that we do our most creative work, when we feel that we are acting according to our own will on behalf of goals we find meaningful.


      Related posts & tools by Deb:



      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      I was never much interested in behaviorist "orthodoxy," stemming from my experience with performance in organizations.  This Deci & Ryan overview article is a true delight to read, consistent with my own co-owner, co-creator philosophy about how change happens in organizations.  

      Deci and Ryan highlight ground breaking, now classic, work of how we have a natural growth orientation.  The post provides examples of SDT in action, case examples and current research trends.   


      ~  Deb

      more...
      Richard Platt's curator insight, December 26, 2013 10:51 PM

      Excellent stuff for CXO's and other leaders to read and understand, highly recommend this read...

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 11:06 PM

      Deci & Ryan's research is a major contributor to understanding the science of motivation.     Dan Pink, author of the book, "Drive" states:
       

      “If you look at the science, there is a mismatch between what science knows and what business does. And what’s alarming here is that our business operating system – think of the set of assumptions and protocols beneath our business, how to motivate people how to apply our human resources – it’s built entirely around these extrinsic motivators, around carrots and sticks."
       

      “That’s actually fine for many kinds of 20th century tasks, but for 21st century tasks, that mechanistic, reward and punishment approach doesn’t work.”   - Dan Pink, TED talk,  2009

      Stephane Gaskin PhD, PPCC's curator insight, February 1, 5:44 PM

      In My opinion, self-determination theory provides the most powerful tools for the acheivement of happiness and well being as well as in the fufilment of hopes, wishes and dreams. I teach the theory as much as I could.

       

       

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      Why Strategic Planning is So Hard for Creative People - Productive Flourishing

      Why Strategic Planning is So Hard for Creative People - Productive Flourishing | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      "Strategic planning is hard for creative people, but not for the reasons most people think."

         

      _____________________
         
      ...Our holistic success depends on us actually finishing things.
          
      _____________________

               


      ....We are most satisfied when we’re making progress on the work that matters to us. We need not finish, but to see progress.

      And this is precisely what messes us up when it comes to both strategic planning and being successful in Project World. 

      We might get emotional satisfaction from making progress on things, but our holistic success depends on us actually finishing things.


      Related posts & tools by Deb:


                   

                 

                

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Ready, aim, fire is about beginnings, not about successful completion.  Progress is not completing. With creativity, the author laments, you're never really done.


      Also check out the GOALS post on the Talent and Performance Development stream here:

      Why Goal Setting Doesn't Work


      I'd say, that is the adventure and beauty of it.  It's also the burden of expection to be in tension in order to get the job done.  ~  Deb

      more...
      simondcollins's curator insight, January 20, 6:13 AM

      Good points for Heads.

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      Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important ~ It's about Whole Life at Work

      Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important  ~ It's about Whole Life at Work | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      "A study shows that work-life balance might not have much to do with employee engagement."

           

      U.S. employees, despite their relatively poor work-life balance, are more emotionally invested and focused on creating value. Does that mean U.S. employees don't value work-life balance? Hardly.


      ______________________

      ...time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is....meaningful work is more valuable.
      ______________________


               

      According to a recent Glassdoor survey,

            

      • 72 percent of American employers feel that vacation, sick time, and holidays are extremely important to their job happiness, 
         
      • Behind only health care (76 percent), which admittedly, is mostly a U.S. issue.

      • We state that vacation is important to our happiness, but the people who are getting it (other countries) are less engaged than the American work force. 
          
      • Only 27 percent of workers felt that development and training was an important workplace issue.


      ...What does this all mean? Probably that time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is, and ...meaningful work is more valuable.


      Look for ways to say yes, give feedback, and encourage employees to contribute in meaningful ways. Don't manage by rules alone. Do these things, and you'll find you have an engaged workforce that does much better than most of those in the U.S.

      Related posts by Deb:
          

      Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

           

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Meaningful work translates to happiness in other definitions. That is why this is listed on a Motivation curation stream.  


      Do you agree that meaningful work is #1 and that development and training is of lower value?   ~  Deb

      more...
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:02 PM

      Meaningful work also means happiness at work.  In trying times, work is a lifeline to many.   That is why joblessness creates tremendous turmoil.  

      Also Scooped to The Art and Science of Motivation.  ~  Deb

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:55 PM

      Are you investing in the right benefits for what really matters to your employees?  Meaningful work = happiness by other definitions. 


      If meaningful work is #1 and development and training is of lower value, what are the implications for the talent in your organization?


      From The Science and Art of Motivation news.  ~  Deb

      Sharrock's curator insight, May 1, 3:14 PM

      This kind of information has implications for knowledge work environments, including school classrooms. Staying engaged and motivated are two issues important in classrooms as well as in the training of staff.

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      5 Big Happiness Myths Debunked ~ And The Power Of Negative Thinking

      5 Big Happiness Myths Debunked ~ And The Power Of Negative Thinking | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      "Oliver Burkeman author of the book The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking has spent years studying what makes people happy.  It's not what you think."


      Excerpts from five of the worst, along with some suggestions for what to do instead:
       


      1.  MAINTAIN A POSITIVE MINDSET

      Research underlines the point: bereaved people who try not to feel grief take longer to recover; experimental subjects who were told to try not to feel sad about some distressing news felt worse. Much more fruitful is the Buddhist-inspired notion of "non-attachment:" learning to let negative emotions arise and pass, resisting the urge to stamp them out. 

       

      2.   AMBITIOUS GOALS, RELENTLESSLY PURSUED, ARE THE KEY TO SUCCESS

      A too-vigorous focus on goals, research suggests, can trigger a variety of unintended consequences: it can degrade performance, and encourage ethical corner-cutting. Moreover, it can badly distort an organization, or a life, by singling out one variable for maximization, regardless of how it's connected to all the others.


      ...The Principle of Affordable Loss, part of the business philosophy known as "effectuation." Instead of asking how likely some venture is to succeed, ask whether you could tolerate the consequences if it failed. That way, you'll take the interestingly risky steps while avoiding the stupidly risky ones.


      Related posts by Deb:

          

      Entrepreneurial Success in Business, Professor Saras Saravathy, Video

           

      Business and Happiness: Gardens, Woods and Rest to Make it Happen



      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      I've shared perspectives on effectuation, and creating the future, connected with Prof. Saras Saravathy (link above. )   It's good to read this balancing piece, providing insights to better understand emotions, happiness and motivation.  ~  D

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      Sharrock's comment, May 1, 3:19 PM
      effectuation seems to be influenced by Kahneman's work contributing to behavior economics as well as Thinking, Fast and Slow. At least, judging from the title of the philosophy.
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      The Lasting Impacts of Poverty on the Brain ~ The Atlantic

      The Lasting Impacts of Poverty on the Brain ~ The Atlantic | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      by Emily Badger


      Poverty shapes people in some hard-wired ways that we're only now beginning to understand. Back in August, we wrote about some provocative new research that found that poverty imposes a kind of tax on the brain. It sucks up so much mental bandwidth – capacity spent wrestling with financial trade-offs, scarce resources, the gap between bills and income – that the poor have fewer cognitive resources left over to succeed at parenting, education, or work. Experiencing poverty is like knocking 13 points off your IQ as you try to navigate everything else. That's like living, perpetually, on a missed night of sleep....


      "Some new research about the long-term arc of poverty, particularly on the brain, was recently published in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesand these findings offer a useful complement to the earlier study....


      "Poor children, in effect, had more problems regulating their emotions as adults (regardless of what their income status was at 24). These same patterns of "dysregulation" in the brain have been observed in people with depression, anxiety disorders, aggression and post-traumatic stress disorders.


      "Over the course of the longitudinal study – which included 49 rural, white children of varying incomes – these same poor children were also exposed to chronic sources of stress like violence and family turmoil, or crowded and low-quality housing. Those kinds of stressors, the researchers theorize, may help explain the link between income status in childhood and how well the brain functions later on. That theory, they write, is consistent with the idea that "early experiences of poverty become embedded within the organism, setting individuals on lifelong trajectories."


      Jim Lerman's insight:


      This appears to be important, ground-breaking, scientific confirmation of what many have been asserting for quite some time.


      Via Jim Lerman
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Poverty and oppression (racism, sexism and other descrimination) create hurdles in motivation.    The research about bandwidth, that "the poor have fewer cognitive resources left over to succeed at parenting, education, or work,"  goes with the last two scoops about decision-making.  


      It's also why programs and services that help interrupt this cycle and provide support, are not just individually helpful but also systemically important.  ~ Deb

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      David Hain's curator insight, November 3, 2013 4:34 AM

      Poverty as a 'tax' on the brain - we must address it meaningfully in 21C!

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      Good Morning! Your Moral Fiber Is Eroding by the Minute - Decisions and Motivation

      Good Morning! Your Moral Fiber Is Eroding by the Minute - Decisions and Motivation | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      "Researchers report that a process known as "ego depletion," by which self-control becomes exhausted, causes us to measurably lose our moral bearings from morning to night."


      The basic insight is that a person’s store of self-control is finite, and can be depleted. Like a muscle, our self-control weakens when we use it and is restored when we rest it. 

      ...Every decision, no matter how small, uses up some of it—what to wear to work, what to eat for breakfast, whether to tell a white lie about why you’re late for a meeting. A person can minimize those decisions in an attempt to husband one’s decision-making capacity—President Obama, citing the ego depletion literature, wears only gray or blue suits for this reason—but one can’t escape all of them. 

      ...just as it does with real muscles, eating—like rest—helps replenish the strength of our decision muscle, so naps and snacks can help ....

      Also in the [cited] paper, [the authors] suggest that “morally relevant tasks should be deliberately ordered throughout the day'' - after some respite.



      Related posts & tools by Deb:

             

                   

                 

       

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      The is an update to "decision fatigue" connected to research into decisions by judges earlier in the day vs. the afternoon.

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      Money Motivation on Dilbert.com

      Money Motivation on Dilbert.com | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      Scott Adams has drawn nearly 9,000 Dilbert cartoons since the strip began, in 1989.  Source, a current article in the Harvard Business Review.


      The links on this ScoopIt post will take you to a 2 page collection of Dilbert strips on Money Motivation including quotes like:


      "...my passion involves working you  like rented mules so I can afford to puchase luxury items."       ~ From a project manager 

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      The November issue of the Harvard Business Review features Scott Adams and his flexibility and success, despite the demise of newspapers that he predicted when he started developing his strips as his main work.


      It's useful to remember that his penetrating commentary on office life comes from someone with an MBA, and IT (Information Technology) and "cube-farm"  background.   ~  Deb 

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      Why “Motivation by Pizza” Doesn’t Work

      Why “Motivation by Pizza” Doesn’t Work | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it

      The motivational techniques used by most managers don’t work.

      ....most of the standard motivational tools like promotions, bonuses, employee of the month awards, pep-talks and free-pizza-nights are downright harmful to the drive, energy and commitment of employees. It only leaves them feeling manipulated, cynical and demotivated.


      Extrinsic motivation has some serious drawbacks:


      • It’s not sustainable – As soon as you withdraw the punishment or reward, the motivation disappears.
         
      • You get diminishing returns – If the punishment or rewards stay at the same levels, motivation slowly drops off.
         
      • To get the same motivation next time requires a bigger reward. It hurts intrinsic motivation – Punishing or rewarding people for doing something removes their own innate desire to do it on their own. From now on you must punish/reward every time to get them to do it.


      See more at: http://positivesharing.com/2006/12/why-motivation-by-pizza-doesnt-work/#sthash.vRqz1Es7.dpuf


      See related posts by Deb:

      Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

                

      Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

            

      3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

       

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      It's helpful to be reminded of the basics of extrinsic, intrinsic motivation and positive, negative emotion in the workplace.  Good refresher!  ~  Deb

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      A Navy SEAL Technique Can Help You Survive Entrepreneur Terror, to Live Another Day

      A Navy SEAL Technique Can Help You Survive Entrepreneur Terror, to Live Another Day | The Science and Art of Motivation | Scoop.it
      Here's how to keep your balance and prevent yourself from being carried away into the throes of despair.


      Excerpt:


      ....if entrepreneurial terror strikes you unprepared, there is one technique you can use to keep your balance and prevent yourself from being carried away into the throes of despair.
       

      It is the same strategy that has helped special forces operatives like Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell survive under circumstances almost too horrendous to contemplate.


      "The ones who survived were the ones who relentlessly focused on one thing and one thing only...."



      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This hits close to home, and chances are you know someone connected with a Navy Seal.   It's helpful to realize how much entrepreneurs can help themselves by being mentally ready for "hell week" in business, and what can make a critical difference.  ~  D

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      Using Neuroscience to Influence Behavior

      This presentation was part of a Week 0 class called "How Neuroscience Influences Human Behavior" at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. 


      The class was co-taught by Marketing Professor Baba Shiv and Nir Eyal (Stanford MBA '08,



      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Useful overview from Stanford on what happens with our brains. and great for considering what drives us.   Looks at Amateur, Skillful, Habitual and Addicive behaviors.

      ~  D

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      simondcollins's curator insight, January 20, 6:16 AM

      Interesting slides concerning behaviour - have a look.