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Librarians are go: Experimenting with curation tools

Librarians are go: Experimenting with curation tools | The Ischool library learningland | Scoop.it
Experimenting with curation tools, en Blog Librarians are go http://t.co/Ru2OZQqW...

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The Explosion of Pinterest and Why You Should Read This Report

The Explosion of Pinterest and Why You Should Read This Report | The Ischool library learningland | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Dave Copeland for Readwriteweb. There have been many articles about Pinterest but if you do nothing else, read the white paper by Engauge and report they're referring to. It is absolutely the best one I've seen to date. (more details below)

 

The most important thing in this piece is the report, here's what you'll see:

 

A new Engauge white paper breaks down:

 

**the make-up of the average Pinterest user 

 

**shows that the end result of less reading is more of a focus on content curation than creation.

 

**The timing of that trend, combined with a stunning design when Internet users are focusing more on visual than text, has allowed Pinterest to explode in popularity.

 

This is what caught my attention - a quote from a user:

 

"When I'm looking for new trends on specific topics like fashion or birthday party themes, I now search Pinterest first -- not Google." - Karah Street

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

If you're in making Pinterest work for you, you might want to visit my other topic: Pinterest Watch. 

 

Read full article here: [http://rww.to/yQtDNQ]


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Alessio Manca's comment, March 15, 2012 1:12 PM
nice thought "People aren't really reading anymore": sounds people are becoming parasites
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Content Curators Will Be The New Great (Specialized) Newspapers [Video]

Robin Good: John McCarus, SVP for Brand Content at Digitas, ignites an interesting panel about content creation vs content curation.

 

This is the second in a series of three videos highlighting a 2012 conversation on the future of media on the social web organized by Ben Elowitz, CEO of Wetpaint.

The nicely edited video, brings up in its four minutes, some valuable takes and opinions on how curation is perceived, used and modulated to achieve different results and objectives.

 

From mere republishing and copying of someone else materials without attribution or credit (certainly not something to be categorized under "curation") to the new cadre of emerging journalists, who not only write, but also monitor, research, pre-digest and cull the most interesting content - not written by them - for their own audiences.

 

Key takeaways:


“A curator is an editor, essentially. You become a trusted source by doing the hard work for your audience and telling them what’s important, whether you’ve written it or not.

Traditionally that’s been the role of great newspapers; now that function is being spread across the web.”
Erick Schonfeld, TechCrunch


-> Publishers have a love / hate relationship with curators.

 

-> Curators help to expand a publisher’s reach, but the publisher risks losing credit (and traffic).

 

-> Curators who link back and republish only enough to pique interest will keep publishers happy.

 

“It’s like the forest episode of Planet Earth: the animal eats the nectar and sort of destroys the plant but spreads the pollen all over.”

Jason Hirschhorn, Media ReDEFined

 

Interesting. 7/10

 

Original video: http://vimeo.com/37553245 

 

Full article: http://digitalquarters.net/2012/02/video-rebooting-media-think-tank-content-creation-vs-curation/ 


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Jeff Makana's comment, March 2, 2012 3:34 AM
Great improvements on delivery of content Robin, Your analysis give the reader added insights. In support and solidarity!
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Curation Tools: The Amsterdam-Born Pinterest Look-Alike for Hip and Cool Stuff - 20Blinks

"...20blinks gives content curation a heady, Dutch twist.

 

If Pinterest opened people's eyes to the joys of content curation, 20blinks unleashes their souls.

 

Supposedly, 20Blinks is a place for sharing and appreciating the finer, funkier things across cultures.

 

Like an ambient content curation platform, 20blinks is dedicated to sharing all things hip.

 

Many of the collections are a delightful trip. It's a mind-blowing place for sharing and discovery of:

- New music and classic grooves
- Contemporary art and photography
- Buzz-worthy books
- Exotic travel inspiration
- Fresh fashion and much more."

(Source: Yahoo - http://voices.yahoo.com/http://voices.yahoo.com/20blinks-hip-social-network-content-curation-10846363.html?cat=15)  

 

Try it out now: http://www.20blinks.com/ 


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Create A Multimedia Timeline To Curate Stories That Have Strong Chronological Narrative: Timeline

Create A Multimedia Timeline To Curate Stories That Have Strong Chronological Narrative: Timeline | The Ischool library learningland | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Timeline is a Javascript open-source solution that allows anyone to create a visual timeline that integrates text, tweets, images, maps, audio recordings and video clips on an infinite scrollable bar. 

 

A project funded by the Knight News Innovation Lab, Timeline works great with stories that have a strong chronological narrative. It does not work well for stories that need to jump around in the timeline.

 

Mashable Sonia Paul writes about it: "Timeline is similar to Storify in that it allows users to aggregate media on the web, it differs in its operation.

 

With Storify, users can drag and drop content into a post.

 

With Timeline, users can either embed the code onto their website using JSON, or — if they don’t want to mess with any coding — they can fill in a ready-made Timeline template on Google Docs.

 

The project is currently hosted on GitHub, and users can find specific directions on how to both embed the code and use the Google Doc template there, too.

 

Future plans for the project include support of more media type, as well as iPhone compatibility, B.C. time support and better seconds and milliseconds support." 

 

Here is the GDoc ready-made template: https://docs.google.com/previewtemplate?id=0AppSVxABhnltdEhzQjQ4MlpOaldjTmZLclQxQWFTOUE&mode=public&ndplr=1&pli=1# 

 

Download: https://github.com/VeriteCo/Timeline/zipball/master ;

 

More info, including how to embed it on your site and what file formats are supported: http://timeline.verite.co/ ;


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Qualilangues's comment, April 12, 2012 6:04 AM
Design unfortunately doesn't seem to be ready for ipads yet.
kessete's curator insight, August 30, 2014 11:06 AM

good for narrative, multimedia, timeline

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Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code

Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code | The Ischool library learningland | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Maria Popova has just launched a classy and laudable initiative, focused on increasing awareness and in highlighting the importance of honoring always where or via who you have got to a certain article, report, video or image.

 

Credit and attribution are not just a "formal" way to comply with rules, laws and authors but an incredibly powerful emebddable mechanism to augment findability, discovery, sinergy and collaboration among human being interested in the same topic.

 

She writes: "In an age of information overload, information discovery — the service of bringing to the public’s attention that which is interesting, meaningful, important, and otherwise worthy of our time and thought — is a form of creative and intellectual labor, and one of increasing importance and urgency.

 

A form of authorship, if you will.

 

Yet we don’t have a standardized system for honoring discovery the way we honor other forms of authorship and other modalities of creative and intellectual investment, from literary citations to Creative Commons image rights."

 

For this purpose Curator's Code was created.

 

Curator's Code is first of all "a movement to honor and standardize attribution of discovery across the web" as well as a web site where you can learn about the two key types of attribution that we should be using:

a) Via - which indicates a link of direct discovery

b) Hat tip - Indicates a link of indirect discovery, story lead, or inspiration.

 

Each one has now a peculiar characterizing icon that Curator's Code suggests to integrate in your news and content publication policies. 

 

Additionally and to make it easy for anyone to integrate these new attribution icons in their work, Curator's Code has created a free bokkmarklet which makes using proper attribution a matter of one clic.

 

Hat tip to Maria Popova and Curator's Code for launching this initiative. 

 

Whether or not you will sign Curator's Code pledge, become an official web site supporting it, or adopt its bookmarklet instantly is not as important as the key idea behind it: by providing credit and attribution to pieces of content you find elsewhere, you not only honestly reward who has spent time to create that content, but you significantly boost the opportunity for thousands of others to connect, link up to, discover and make greater sense of their search for meaning.

 

Read Maria Popova introductory article to Curator's Code: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/09/curators-code/ ;

 

How to use the Curator's bookmarklet: http://vimeo.com/38243275 ;

 

Healthy. Inspiring. 9/10

 

Curator's Code official web site: http://curatorscode.org/ ;

 

This is very helpful and will share - thanks Robin!


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Beth Kanter's comment, March 11, 2012 1:01 PM
Thanks Robin for sharing and curating this article with your summary. I discovered it via Barbara Bray's collection where she had re scooped your scoop -- [and if following the curator's code added a via]. I came over here to rescoop (with a via!) because you are the original source and one of the links was broken (you corrected it and added an update) thus reminding me the importance of going to the original source. Here on scoop.it you can just follow the trail of the rescoop icon.

I am disappointed that the bookmarklet doesn't work together with the scoop.it one - but it would be great to have it integrated. Now to figure out how to rescoop it with the characters.
Robin Good's comment, March 11, 2012 1:12 PM
Hi Beth, thanks for your kind feedback. I was just out today for a video interview with Nancy White here in Rome, and she mentioned you as someone she likes for your ability to curate and make sense of things.

Re the integration of the curators' code icons, I have received feedback from Guillaume De Cugies of Scoop.it that he has been exchanging with Maria Popova and that he is looking with her for a way to integrate the two.

For now you can simply install the Curators' Code bookmarklet and use the "via"<a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x1525;</a> or hat tip <a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x21ac;</a> icons by copying and pasting their code into your scoops manually. The problem, at least for me is, that the scoop.it editing window is in the same position where the Curators' Code bookmarklet is and therefore I can't see both at the same time.

In any case I think it would be trivial for Scoop.it or any other tool to integrate such buttons directly into their system without having us to use two different tools for one task.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:36 PM
Many thanks Robin for the help! Somehow I missed the article -- computer fatigue probably :) I read it earlier today and look forward to using the codes. I'm thrilled to hear that scoop.it is looking into integrating them into the platform. Thanks for keeping us updated on this new, and important twist, for curating. Cheers -- Karen
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Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking

Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator. 

 

"Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and reluctance to question received wisdom, authority and tradition" while learning how to adopt "intellectual discipline" and a way to express clearly ideas while taking personal responsibility for them.

 

Key takeaways from this video:

 

Critical thinking refers to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with "evaluating information" as well as our own thought in a disciplined way.
  Critical thinking is not just thinking a lot. To be an effective critical thinker you need to seek out and be guided by "knowledge" and "evidence" that fits with reality even if it refutes what the general consensus may want to believe.
  Critical thinkers cultivate an attitude of curiosity and they are willing to do the work required to keep themselves informed about a subject.
  Critical thinkers do not take claims at face value but utilize scepticism and doubt to suspend judgement and objectively evaluate with facts the claims being made.
  Critical thinkers should evaluate information on the basis of reasoning and not by relying on emotions as claims the factuality of a claim cannot be solely based on the level of emotion that accompanies them or the fact that they may be believed by certain groups.

 

Highly recommended for all curators. 9/10

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLPL5p0fMg&amp;nbsp;

 


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Beth Kanter's comment, February 21, 2012 11:56 PM
Thank you for sharing this video and the importance of critical thinking. It is so easy to get into the mindless consumption trap and making ourselves slow down, read, think, question, and seek is so important. It is all about the resisting the urge to click, but to hit the pause button and make yourself think
Mayra Aixa Villar's comment, February 22, 2012 10:14 AM
Grazie come sempre, Robin! You always share valuable information and this video is a great source to reflect on the importance of critical thinking to refine thought processes when curating content. Content curation certainly requires and develops "better thinking".
Gregory Thackston's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:54 PM

Critical thinking is a key component in addressing autonomous adversity and the need to collaborate in decision making.