The Sad Decline of Public Education
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Rescooped by Mick Tierney from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
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The Hidden Benefits of Learning History

The Hidden Benefits of Learning History | The Sad Decline of Public Education | Scoop.it
When you think about history, you probably think about dates, events, and other boring information you were forced to memorize in school. Instead, you should think of history as medicine that can be prescribed to your modern problems.

Via Danielle M. Villegas
Mick Tierney's insight:

Real history, that is - not the manipulated, agenda driven tripe that characterizes today's efforts. Example: in December at Berkeley, some of those who successfully initiated the "Free Speech Movement" will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Unfortunately, those who currently populate the Berkeley campus no longer believe in it or tolerate it. Sic transit gloria.

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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, November 12, 2014 3:36 PM

This is a great video and article brought to my attention by Craig Cardimon. As someone with a Bachelor's degree in History, and raised by a historian father, I concur with this video. History, above all else, provides perspective and understanding of how we got to be where we are now, why our culture is the way it is wherever we are, why language has developed the way it has, etc.  Understanding history of anything--even something like the development of a product in tech writing--has its merits. Check out the video on this page, and think about it. What do you think? Do you think history has its place?

--techcommgeekmom

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Compulsory Education and the Monkey Trial by G. K. Chesterton | Christian Rationality. Reason. Faith. Christ. Virtue.

Compulsory Education and the Monkey Trial by G. K. Chesterton | Christian Rationality. Reason. Faith. Christ. Virtue. | The Sad Decline of Public Education | Scoop.it
Education, theology, and science, Chesterton critically examines the uncritical presumptions about religious and secular education. Reason, religion and rationalism.
Mick Tierney's insight:

The problem arises out of compulsory education. It is the great paradox of the modern world. It is the fact that at the very time when the world decided that people should not be coerced about their form of religion, it also decided that they should be coerced about their education.

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