The Romantics
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"London" by William Blake (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

The repetition of words gives this poem a peculiar strength. You can hear his disgust at the state of London. Churches were blackened by soot and smog, but t...
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This was a very good reading of William Blakes poem, London. I find that listening to the poem being read out is very beneficial and helps you pick up on more techniques and meaning.

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BBC - GCSE Bitesize: William Blake

BBC - GCSE Bitesize: William Blake | The Romantics | Scoop.it
A secondary school revision resource for GCSE English Literature about the context of William Blake's The Little Boy Lost / The Little Boy Found
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This site was a good breif but informative way to learn about Blake's life. I found it very useful and very interesting.

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Romanticism and British Literature

A video that describes the historical events surrounding the Romantic movement of literature.
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This video about the Romantic era was very useful in giving a detailed view of the movement of the Romantics and what they did to change British literature. This was very insightful.

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SparkNotes: Wordsworth’s Poetry: Context

A short William Wordsworth biography describes William Wordsworth's life, times, and work. Also explains the historical and literary context that influenced Wordsworth’s Poetry.
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This page was good to give WIlliam Wordsworth's context which helps alot when reading his work. I liked this site alot as it was very clear and very useful.

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29 Oct 1873 - WILLIAM WORDSWORTH.

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I found this very interesting as it was an article on Wordsworth written a long time ago which was very fascinating.

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William Blake Biography

William Blake Biography | The Romantics | Scoop.it
William Blake was a 19th century writer and artist who has been labeled insane, a genius and a prophet, as well as all three in a single breath. Learn more at Biography.com.
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I really liked this site. It went into William Blake's life in detail but in clear sections. Very good context website

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Tintern Abbey - William Wordsworth

"All which we behold is full of blessings." Thus Wordsworth punctuates his faith and describes his journey as a lover of Nature. A presentation of Samuel God...
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This is a beautiful reading of William Wordsworth's poem Tintern Abbey. I liked this as it well portrayed the image I had painted in my mind.

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Poet: William Wordsworth - All poems of William Wordsworth

Poet: William Wordsworth - All poems of William Wordsworth | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Poet: William Wordsworth - All poems of William Wordsworth. poetry
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I really liked this site because it gave you links to copies of all of Wordsworth's work and there was also a forum where people could share their ideas and thoughts on the poems which was very good.

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Louise Moreton's comment, November 22, 2013 4:05 AM
Very insightful comments Ashleigh!
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Romanticism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Romanticism (also the Romantic era or the Romantic period) was an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Partly a reaction to the Industrial Revolution,[1] it was also a revolt against aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment and a reaction against the scientific rationalization of nature.[2] It was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature, but had a major impact on historiography,[3] education[4] and the natural sciences.[5] Its effect on politics was considerable and complex; while for much of the peak Romantic period it was associated with liberalism and radicalism, in the long term its effect on the growth of nationalism was probably more significant.

The movement validated strong emotion as an authentic source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as apprehension, horror and terror, and awe—especially that which is experienced in confronting the sublimity of untamed nature and its picturesque qualities, both new aesthetic categories. It elevated folk art and ancient custom to something noble, made spontaneity a desirable characteristic (as in the musical impromptu), and argued for a "natural" epistemology of human activities as conditioned by nature in the form of language and customary usage. Romanticism reached beyond the rational and Classicist ideal models to elevate a revived medievalism and elements of art and narrative perceived to be authentically medieval in an attempt to escape the confines of population growth, urban sprawl, and industrialism, and it also attempted to embrace the exotic, unfamiliar, and distant in modes more authentic than Rococo chinoiserie, harnessing the power of the imagination to envision and to escape.

Although the movement was rooted in the German Sturm und Drang movement, which prized intuition and emotion over Enlightenment rationalism, the ideologies and events of the French Revolution laid the background from which both Romanticism and the Counter-Enlightenment emerged. The confines of the Industrial Revolution also had their influence on Romanticism, which was in part an escape from modern realities; indeed, in the second half of the 19th century, "Realism" was offered as a polarized opposite to Romanticism.[6] Romanticism elevated the achievements of what it perceived as heroic individualists and artists, whose pioneering examples would elevate society. It also legitimized the individual imagination as a critical authority, which permitted freedom from classical notions of form in art. There was a strong recourse to historical and natural inevitability, a Zeitgeist, in the representation of its ideas.

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This site, though not recommended, was a very good overview of the Romantics period and what the members did during this period

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