The role of fast-food advertisements on our eating habits
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7 Highly Disturbing Trends in Junk Food Advertising to Children

7 Highly Disturbing Trends in Junk Food Advertising to Children | The role of fast-food advertisements on our eating habits | Scoop.it
From bribing children with toys to convincing them to eat a “fourth meal,” the industry is glutted with perverse, profit-chasing schemes.
Katie Davis's insight:

This article goes over several of the top marketing techniques fast-food and junk food use to appeal to customers. It was found that many junk-food and fast-food ads were geared towards children. This source is ethical because it provides direct links to where they gathered their data from. It is also appropriate because it examines many different parts of the advertisements and why they are so appealing.  This article will be helpful to me in my future arguments because my entire goal is to figure out and argue if, and why, fast food advertisements link to our eating habits.  

 

Gottesdiener, Laura. "7 Highly Disturbing Trends in Junk Food Advertising to 
     Children." Alternet. N.p., 29 Nov. 2012. Web. 26 Mar. 2013. 
     <http://www.alternet.org/food/ ;
     7-highly-disturbing-trends-junk-food-advertising-children>.

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Joe Bueter's comment, April 11, 2013 12:14 PM
Be more specific with how you want to use a source.
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Fast-food giants try to cut the 'guilty,' leave the 'pleasure'

Fast-food giants try to cut the 'guilty,' leave the 'pleasure' | The role of fast-food advertisements on our eating habits | Scoop.it
Fast food surges through Alec Armbruster's veins. His father, an advertising expert, has consulted for McDonald's, while Alec, 18, has stuffed many of his teen years with a...

Via Cathryn Wellner
Katie Davis's insight:

This article discusses how many fast food restaurants do have healthy alternatives available, they just simply aren't being advertised. The article points out that these restaurants often advertise what they know majorirty of people crave, the food options with the good flavor. This article is reliable because it is from a trusted news source and it provides direct links and references to studies that it refers to. It is also not a bias article, it is extremely objective which makes for a good research argument resource. This artile will be helpful to me in my arguments because part of the article is in reference to an advertising expert which is a large part of the topic I am examining. 

 

Briggs, Bill. "Fast-food giants try to cut the 'guilty,' leave the 'pleasure.'" 
     NBC News. NBC News, 20 Aug. 2012. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. 
     <http://www.nbcnews.com/business/ ;
     fast-food-giants-try-cut-guilty-leave-pleasure-955584?streamSlug=businessmain>.

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Advertising Perception: We Know When Ads Are Inaccurate

Advertising Perception: We Know When Ads Are Inaccurate | The role of fast-food advertisements on our eating habits | Scoop.it

We all know the old saying that ‘perception is reality,’ but it doesn’t apply to everything. For example, when it comes to advertising perception, we all know it’s not always reality. When we see that big, juicy perfect burger on the television screen, we know the real one isn’t going to look like that. You can see some hilarious pictures that illustrate the difference on Advertised Fast Food Compared To The Real Deal. This also applies to online advertising and really any type of advertising. The advertising perception is that it’s just not reality. Could this be the reason why we are so turned off by ads? If the advertising perception is so different than reality, that could explain why we just view ads as ‘noise,’ and we want to eliminate them from our daily experience. That could be why so many online marketers are ditching traditional Internet ads and shifting to content marketing and social media engagement....


Via Jeff Domansky
Katie Davis's insight:

This source stresses that "perception is not reality" and perhaps we are more aware of advertisements' goals. It also goes into more detail about the reasons why we do buy things we've seen on advertisements, even if it is not because we think it is a quality product. This source is ethical and appropriate because it is based on a survey done on real advertisement consumers. It gives real examples of the top brands that people prefer. This source is extremely helpful and will be used to look at the other side of my argument, but also reinforce points that I am eager to get across. 

 

Adams, Diana. "Advertising Perception: We Know When Ads Are Inaccurate." 
     Bitrebels. N.p., 24 Mar. 2013. Web. 26 Mar. 2013. 
     <http://www.bitrebels.com/business-2/ ;
     advertising-perception-inaccurate-ads/>.

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The fast-food industry’s $4.2 billion marketing blitz

The fast-food industry’s $4.2 billion marketing blitz | The role of fast-food advertisements on our eating habits | Scoop.it
Yale's Rudd Center reports that the fast-food industry spent $4.2 billion on marketing last year. That's a sign of the industry's robust financial health -- and bad news for the public's health.
Katie Davis's insight:

This article focuses on the unrealistic amount of money spent on fast-food advertising every year compares to that of the money spent advertising health foods. It turns out that for every fast-food ad, one tenth of that amount of money is being spent on health food awareness. This source is ethical because it refers to reliable health administrations for references.  It is appropriate because it uses a combination of research studies and surverys for its data. This source will help me with my argument because one of my major points is that advertising must be important, because ridiculous amounts of money are spent on them every year. 

 

Philpott, Tom. "The fast-food industry’s $4.2 billion marketing blitz." 
     Grist. N.p., 10 Nov. 2010. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. <http://grist.org/ ;
     article/ 
     food-2010-11-09-the-fast-food-industrys-4-2-billion-marketing-blitz/>.

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Joe Bueter's comment, April 11, 2013 12:13 PM
Interesting popular source commentary, but be sure to find academic-based commentary, too.
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US Consumers Trust Online Reviews More Than They Do Advertisements and Direct Marketing Messages

US Consumers Trust Online Reviews More Than They Do Advertisements and Direct Marketing Messages | The role of fast-food advertisements on our eating habits | Scoop.it
US Consumers Trust Online Reviews More Than They Do Advertisements and Direct Marketing Messages http://t.co/MZuJ3fN9gV
Katie Davis's insight:

This article discusses how studies have shown that many people trust reliable, honest online reviews over advertisements on television or other social media. It also discusses how these feelings that consumers have effects advertisers, marketers and business owners. This source is ethical because it pulls from direct studies and provides data charts to show the outcome of the studies. It also discusses real experiences with product consumption that people have had from online reviews and advertisements. This article will be helpful to my future arguments because it examines the other side of the argument by showing that not all people get sucked in by flashy television advertisements

 

Adams, Diana. "Advertising Perception: We Know When Ads Are Inaccurate." 
     Bitrebels. N.p., 24 Mar. 2013. Web. 26 Mar. 2013. 
     <http://www.bitrebels.com/business-2/ ;
     advertising-perception-inaccurate-ads/>. 
 

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Joe Bueter's comment, April 11, 2013 12:11 PM
The key here is to cite and annotate the Forrester Research report, instead of this, which is a report of what they found.