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The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium
Algorithms are the new medium between people and people, people and data, data and data.
Curated by Pierre Levy
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Synaptic transistor learns while it computes | Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Synaptic transistor learns while it computes | Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
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How TapTap is turning the wearable into a new gesture-based user interface

How TapTap is turning the wearable into a new gesture-based user interface | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
TapTap-creator Woodenshark is one of several startups aiming to turn the connected wristband from a mere recorder of activity into a device that can communicate and control other apps through gesture and touch.
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The Hidden Technology That Makes Twitter Huge

The Hidden Technology That Makes Twitter Huge | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
How did an unprofitable startup become a multibillion-dollar public company? By making sophistication look simple
Pierre Levy's insight:

The power of metadata!

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luiy's curator insight, November 10, 2013 10:54 AM

While a tweet thrives in its timeline, among the other tweets, it’s also designed to stand on its own, forever. Any tweet might show up embedded inside a million different websites. It may be called up and re-displayed years after posting. For all their supposed ephemerality, tweets have real staying power.

 

Once born, they’re alone and must find their own way to the world, like a just-hatched sea turtle crawling to the surf. Luckily they have all of the information they need in order to make it: A tweet knows the identity of its creator, whether bot or human, as well as the location from which it originated, the date and time it went out, and dozens of other little things—so that wherever it finds itself, the tweet can be reconstituted. Millennia from now an intelligence coming across a single tweet could, like an archaeologist pondering a chunk of ancient skull, deduce an entire culture.

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All tweets share the same anatomy. To examine the guts of a tweet, you request an “API key” from Twitter, which is a fast, automated procedure. You then visit special Web addresses that, instead of nicely formatted Web pages for humans to read, return raw data for computers to read. That data is expressed in a computer language—a smushed-up nest of brackets and characters. It’s a simplified version of JavaScript called JSON, which stands for JavaScript Object Notation. API essentially means “speaks (and reads) JSON.” The language comes in a bundle of name/value fields, 31 of which make up a tweet. For example, if a tweet has been “favorited” 25 times, the corresponding name is “favorite_count” and “25” is the value.

Fàtima Galan's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:19 AM

"This metadata contains not just tidy numerals like “25” but also whole new sets of name/value pairs—big weird trees of data. A good example is in the “coordinates” part of the tweet. "

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Intel launches an internet of things division that will rival its data center and software group

Intel launches an internet of things division that will rival its data center and software group | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Intel’s formalizing its interest in the internet of things with the creation of a new division that will report up to the chip giant’s executive office.
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Down to the Wire

Down to the Wire | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
To use these molecules in electronic circuits, they must be able to connect with metal wires.
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Disney Research Develops Algorithm That Generates 3D Models from 2D Images | Technology Blog

Disney Research Develops Algorithm That Generates 3D Models from 2D Images | Technology Blog | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Disney Research Develops Algorithm That Generates 3D Models from 2D Images Disney Research has developed an innovative algorithm that generates
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Warren Karlenzig - Collective Intelligence: Cities as Global Sustainability Platform | #smartcities

"Social media and collaborative technologies--layered with smart systems combining geo-location data with human experience--will make cities the driving sustainability force in a dawning planetary era. Cities will anticipate new risks with rapid urban systems innovation based upon crowdsourcing, virtual and physical communities, and transparent markets sensitive to full carbon and resource costs. Creatively leveraging collective intelligence for clean energy, low carbon mobility and sustainable food and water, the new urban grid will enable high local quality of life, lifelong learning and vibrant green economies."


Via Howard Rheingold, Myrfa Yumiaji, luiy
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, July 24, 2013 4:36 PM

A TedX talk. It's good to be wary of solutionism in regard to solving social problems, but neither is it wise to rely on antiquated bureaucracies (alone) or private enterprise (alone) to tackle some of the real problems (and  unlock some of the real opportunities) of urbanization.

Guillermo Cerceau's comment, August 19, 2013 6:30 PM
I feel that the lecture leaves out all matters related to political power, precisely THE issue of cities and collaboration, I mean, that is what the "polis" of politics means.
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Where Humans Will Always Beat the Robots

Where Humans Will Always Beat the Robots | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Software might be eating the world, but Rob Miller, a professor of computer science at MIT, foresees a "crowd computing" revolution that makes workers and machines colleagues rather than competitors.
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New Algorithm Can Spot the Bots in Your Twitter Feed | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

New Algorithm Can Spot the Bots in Your Twitter Feed | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Researchers have created an algorithm that can tell—with 85 percent accuracy—whether a Twitter account is home to a bot or (worse) a corporate shill.
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luiy's curator insight, October 19, 2013 2:04 PM

You know Twitter spam when you see it—but wouldn’t it be nice if you didn’t have to see it?

 

Unfortunately, email-style filters, which analyze message contents, are of little help. Due to the rigors of 140-character communication, even legitimate tweets tend to read like Nigerian phishing scams, while the hucksters often hide their pitches in links. So Twitter simply puts the onus on users to report offending accounts.

 

But a fascinating recent study from Imperial College London suggests a new approach. Borrowing some tricks from computational neuroscience, coauthors Gabriela Tavares and Aldo Faisal have come up with an algorithm that can tell—with 85 percent accuracy—whether a Twitter account is home to a bot or (worse) a corporate shill instead of a regular person.

 

It’s all in the timing. By analyzing the timestamps on 165,000 tweets, the researchers found that these three user types—individuals, companies, and robots—have very distinct activity patterns. Think of it as temporal fingerprinting. The approach could eventually be used to create more effective filters for all kinds of social networks.

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#Bayesian Methods for Hackers | #datascience

#Bayesian Methods for Hackers | #datascience | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Bayesian Methods for Hackers : An intro to Bayesian methods + probabilistic programming with a computation/understanding-first, mathematics-second point of view.

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luiy's curator insight, October 14, 2013 11:35 AM

Bayesian Methods for Hackers is designed as a introduction to Bayesian inference from a computational/understanding-first, and mathematics-second, point of view. Of course as an introductory book, we can only leave it at that: an introductory book. For the mathematically trained, they may cure the curiosity this text generates with other texts designed with mathematical analysis in mind. For the enthusiast with less mathematical-background, or one who is not interested in the mathematics but simply the practice of Bayesian methods, this text should be sufficient and entertaining.

 

The choice of PyMC as the probabilistic programming language is two-fold. As of this writing, there is currently no central resource for examples and explanations in the PyMC universe. The official documentation assumes prior knowledge of Bayesian inference and probabilistic programming. We hope this book encourages users at every level to look at PyMC. Secondly, with recent core developments and popularity of the scientific stack in Python, PyMC is likely to become a core component soon enough.

PyMC does have dependencies to run, namely NumPy and (optionally) SciPy. To not limit the user, the examples in this book will rely only on PyMC, NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib only.

Leonardo Auslender's curator insight, October 15, 2013 7:40 AM

Not at this moment.

 

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Google, NASA explain quantum computing and making mincemeat of big data

Google, NASA explain quantum computing and making mincemeat of big data | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Google, along with its peers at NASA and D-Wave, has released a short video explaining its new quantum computer and the potential — albeit yet unimagined — things it will be able to do.
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A New Programming Language That Can Shape Our DNA

A New Programming Language That Can Shape Our DNA | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Get ready for a time when telling a cell to do something is as easy as coding a website.

Via Spaceweaver
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BBC plans to help get UK coding

BBC plans to help get UK coding | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
The BBC will launch an initiative in 2015 to get coding more widespread in schools and homes.
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Thomas Salmon's curator insight, October 15, 2013 6:49 AM

Bring it on the BBC gets into coding :)

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#Quantum 'world record' smashed

#Quantum 'world record' smashed | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it

A fragile quantum memory state has been held stable at room temperature for a "world record" 39 minutes - overcoming a key barrier to ultrafast computers.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, November 16, 2013 12:48 PM

"Qubits" of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before.

 

Quantum systems are notoriously fickle to measure and manipulate, but if harnessed could transform computing.

 

The new benchmark was set by an international team led by Mike Thewalt of Simon Fraser University, Canada.

Continue reading the main story“Start Quote

"39 minutes may not seem very long. But these lifetimes are many times longer than previous experiments”

Stephanie SimmonsOxford University

"This opens the possibility of truly long-term storage of quantum information at room temperature," said Prof Thewalt, whose achievement is detailed in the journal Science.

In conventional computers, "bits" of data are stored as a string of 1s and 0s.

 

But in a quantum system, "qubits" are stored in a so-called "superposition state" in which they can be both 1s and 0 at the same time - enabling them to perform multiple calculations simultaneously.

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From the NSA to OKCupid, 5 Algorithms That Rule Your World

From the NSA to OKCupid, 5 Algorithms That Rule Your World | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
From the NSA to OKCupid.
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luiy's curator insight, November 13, 2013 11:40 AM

1. The NSA’s Surveillance Algorithm

The NSA’s surveillance programs work, or so they claim, by collecting metadata: not the content of your phone calls and emails, but their length, who they connect you to, and when they happen.

 

2. Encryption Algorithms

Another way to combat surveillance is to confuse the algorithms—turning their own capabilities against them. Encryption algorithms encode your data, using a secret formula to turn it into an unreadable mass that entities like the NSA can’t process. That’s how post-PRISM services like Silent Circle and Least Authority protect their users’ phone calls and messages from snooping. But encryption algorithms have a very long history.

 

3. Google Search

If you’ve ever had Google fill in the rest of your search text like a mind-reader, you’ve also experienced an algorithm at work. Compounding what you’ve previously searched with what other users search for every day, Google’s algorithms can predict what you’re looking for with a frightening degree of accuracy.

 

4. High-Frequency Trading Algorithms

In the heyday of Wall Street, traders shouted across exchange floors to buy and sell stocks. These days, it’s a whole lot quieter—around 50 percent of trading is done by firms specializing in “high-frequency trading” (HFT), which refers to rapid-fire share buys and sells carried out by computer programs rather than humans. Hedge funds that specialize in HFT develop proprietary algorithms to determine what they buy and sell and when, then the programs carry out those instructions in milli- or microseconds. 

 

5. OKCupid

Algorithms influence even our intimate relationships. The now-iconic surveys of OKCupid, the question-and-answer sessions the dating site spews out to help match its users, provide the data for the site’s compatibility algorithms.

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6th International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence Technologies and Applications - ICCCI 2014

6th International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence Technologies and Applications - ICCCI 2014 | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, November 8, 2013 7:09 AM

Interesting combination of computational and social approaches to augmented ("computational") collective intelligence -- this conference is an indicator that serious collective intelligence research is maturing.

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AugCog: The Center for Augmented Cognition

Augmented cognition is about making tools for thinking. It is not about designing tools that humans can use, but about extending humanity's abilities through software, hardware or conceptual tools. We focus mainly on software here, curating a collection of links and resources. Email Sam Gerstenzang with any suggestions.


Via Howard Rheingold
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IT's curator insight, November 5, 2013 6:00 AM

Tools for thinking. Amazing.

Katterley's curator insight, November 10, 2013 2:50 AM

Exciting! Get involved and get busy!

Helen Teague's curator insight, November 23, 4:28 PM

Howard Rheingold's insight:

"A promising new site. They name Vannevar Bush, J.C.R. Licklider, and Douglas Engelbart as 'the canon,'"

their blog continues to  develop

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The 4 Levels of UX Design

The 4 Levels of UX Design | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Knowing a few key things about strategy and tactics makes all the difference between designing a struggling website and a successful one. These examples and tips illustrate successful approaches to UX design that you can apply to your site.
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SODAQ, Solar Powerd Arduino Compatible Board

SODAQ, Solar Powerd Arduino Compatible Board | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it

With our solar powered data acquisition technology, data can be collected virtually anywhere and transferred to the internet at low cost. This makes it an ideal node for "The Internet of Things"

 

SODAQ is an Open Source Arduino compatible and with Arduino's easy programming language it is no longer difficult to build stand alone monitoring devices.


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Software-defined data center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Software-defined data center

Software-defined data center (SDDC) is an architectural approach to IT infrastructure that extends virtualization concepts such as abstraction, pooling, and automation to all of the data center's resources and services to achieve IT as a service. In a software-defined data center, "compute, storage, networking, security, and availability services are pooled, aggregated, and delivered as software, and managed by intelligent, policy-driven software."

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Mobilize 2013 recap: The internet of things is bigger than ever

Mobilize 2013 recap: The internet of things is bigger than ever | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
This year’s Mobilize conference showed us that the internet of things is bringing mobile tech to places where you’d never expect it.
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Q and A With Prof. Scott Aaronson on D-Wave's Quantum Computer

Q and A With Prof. Scott Aaronson on D-Wave's Quantum Computer | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
A Q and A with MIT Professor Scott Aaronson on D-Wave's quantum computing claims.
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Neuro-Inspired Chips for Robots and Smartphones | MIT Technology Review

Neuro-Inspired Chips for Robots and Smartphones | MIT Technology Review | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
World’s largest smartphone chipmaker offers to custom-build very efficient neuro-inspired chips for phones, robots, and vision systems.
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