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The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium
Algorithms are the new medium between people and people, people and data, data and data. Internet of things, smart cities, cryptocurrencies...
Curated by Pierre Levy
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UK suicide-prevention charity Samaritans checks Twitter timelines for worrying posts

UK suicide-prevention charity Samaritans checks Twitter timelines for worrying posts | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
The charity has launched a service called Samaritans Radar, which helps and encourages Twitter users to support potentially depressed contacts. However, some see it as invasive and counterproductive.
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The internet of things is here, but the rules to run it are not

The internet of things is here, but the rules to run it are not | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
The objects around us — from cars to clothes to baby monitors — are now internet-connected, and acting almost on their own. What laws do we need to control and protect ourselves when these objects act up?
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Governing Algorithms: A Provocation Piece by Solon Barocas, Sophie Hood, Malte Ziewitz :: SSRN

Governing Algorithms: A Provocation Piece by Solon Barocas, Sophie Hood, Malte Ziewitz :: SSRN | The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium | Scoop.it
Algorithms have developed into somewhat of a modern myth. They “compet[e] for our living rooms” (Slavin 2011), “determine how a billion plus people get where th
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governance, automation, computation, big data, sociology, law, public policy, control

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luiy's curator insight, April 22, 2013 4:59 AM

Abstract:      
Algorithms have developed into somewhat of a modern myth. They “compet[e] for our living rooms” (Slavin 2011), “determine how a billion plus people get where they’re going” (McGee 2011), “have already written symphonies as moving as those composed by Beethoven” (Steiner 2012), and “free us from sorting through multitudes of irrelevant results” (Spring 2011). Nevertheless, the nature and implications of such orderings are far from clear. What exactly is it that algorithms “do”? What is the role attributed to “algorithms” in these arguments? How can we turn the “problem of algorithms” into an object of productive inquiry? This paper sets out to trouble the coherence of the algorithm as an analytical category and explores its recent rise in scholarship, policy, and practice through a series of provocations.

 

Keywords: algorithms, governance, automation, computation, big data, sociology, law, public policy, control