The rise of home recording studios
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The Anatomy of Three Voiceover Home Studios – Part 2

The Anatomy of Three Voiceover Home Studios – Part 2 | The rise of home recording studios | Scoop.it
Recording equipment for voiceover home studios. Part two of a three part series.

Via CourVO
Shad Wave's insight:

This article basically tells us if you want to do voice overs on your songs you need a home studio.

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Home recording studios tutorials

Home recording studios tutorials | The rise of home recording studios | Scoop.it
A blog containing tutorials on home studio equipment, how to build cheap home studios, the best prices for recording items.

Via Robert Cane
Shad Wave's insight:

In this article was basically telling you the that even if you have a home studio you still travel a lot, in this article it gives you good information about cheap equipments to have to have a portable studio where you can set up any where.

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Rescooped by Shad Wave from Does home recording boom = professional studio doom?
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Could home recording doom professional music studios?

Could home recording doom professional music studios? | The rise of home recording studios | Scoop.it
Inexpensive home recording equipment helps artists rise from outside the mainstream labels.

Via Soulman's Daughter
Shad Wave's insight:

My insight was that the major bands that use to pay top top dollars for studio time, at these big time studios are now stsrting to use more home studios because of budgeting

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Emilia Medhanie's curator insight, August 16, 2014 8:58 PM

Artist are saving money by recording at home. See how this is affecting Professional studios.

Jake Cohen's curator insight, October 8, 2014 12:53 PM

I found this article to be very informative. While neither the publication (Christian Science Monitor) nor the author specializes in the world of music and recording, both are part of very reliable news source. Also, the author includes quotes from people who are professionals and specialize in recording industry to provide the necessary expertise to make this article reliable. I felt like this article was also fairly unbiased in that, the author seemed to be almost moderation a debate on the issue of Home Recording Studios vs Profession Studios. He had quotes from both sides of the issue and used the information effectively to discuss the topic.

 

Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:35 AM

I believe this article brings some good information out about how many people are shifting from recording in traditional recording studios to now trying their hand in their own home with a computer. It brings up relevant material and some facts about spending on equipment.

Rescooped by Shad Wave from Does home recording boom = professional studio doom?
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The New York Times > Arts > Music > Home Sweet Studio

The New York Times > Arts > Music > Home Sweet Studio | The rise of home recording studios | Scoop.it
Making an album used to mean booking time in an expensive professional studio; now, it can be a matter of rolling out of bed and pressing a button.

Via Soulman's Daughter
Shad Wave's insight:

This article tells how more and more top 40 songs are starting to come home studios and not big studios.

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Soulman's Daughter's curator insight, August 14, 2013 7:11 PM

This source is from the New York Times, a reputable and well-known news magazine, that entails a range of topics. In this article, an insight into the development and boom of the home recording studio, takes an informative and enlightening approach in engaging the reader. This article was written in 2005, however the information is still objective in natuer and relates to the topic involved. The writer was easy to verify, with a quick link to their name, showing their previous works and their credentials. The writer is centered in music for New York Times, and can be relied on for their consistency and reputation that they have gained. 

Zack Seavey's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:38 PM

This article makes a good point that studios can cost up to a few hundred and hour, but then if you buy pro tools and the plug in interface its about $450. Over all its the lower cost that are beating the bigger companies. It paints a picture with actual artists doing it today and saving money.

Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:42 AM

This source is from the New York Times. It delves into how convenient home recording can be compared to recording in a studio. It also explores the mindset comparisons of the two. I believe this article shares just how much this can benefit the artist and can be a good thing.

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Home recording studios challenge the majors | Tune In Music City | The Tennessean

Home recording studios challenge the majors | Tune In Music City | The Tennessean | The rise of home recording studios | Scoop.it

Via Soulman's Daughter
Shad Wave's insight:

My insight was just years ago there was not that many places that big artist go to recorde but now because of home studios there plenty places you could go now and there starting to really advertise it. and its hurting the big studios.

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Soulman's Daughter's curator insight, August 14, 2013 5:41 PM

This article comes from a reputable source whose focus is within the music business. The author is easily verified on the website, and carries many followers on this blog. Its information provides two sides to the coin, ensuring its neutrality and objectivity in its standpoint. The article was written by an author involved in the music business, making this source reliable in regards to its accuracy of information.

Yadaliz Rivera's curator insight, January 19, 2014 11:37 PM

In the recording industry, on a daily bases you see more artists and producers looking towards home studios instead of going to professional ones for many reasons. Accesibility is a big role player as is how easily a song or an album can now be recorded instead of the longer process that recording in a professional studio would take.

Zack Seavey's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:30 PM

I have to say this article really goes into how much the big studios are taking a hit. Now they are going to rent out some of their equipment just to keep money coming in.