The Programmable City
42.8K views | +0 today
Follow
The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
Curated by Rob Kitchin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

The Raw and the Cooked: The Mythologies of Big Data - Kate Crawford - DataEDGE 2013 (video)

DataEDGE 2013 - http://dataedge.ischool.berkeley.edu The Raw and the Cooked: The Mythologies of Big Data Kate Crawford, Principal Researcher, Microsoft Resea...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Restoring Cities as Engines of Opportunity: Data, Tech and Systems Change

Restoring Cities as Engines of Opportunity: Data, Tech and Systems Change | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
At their best, America's cities are the engine for national prosperity and individual economic opportunity. Indeed, for generations, people from around the
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Humanities gone spatial: Scholars use GIS technology to open new opportunities

Humanities gone spatial: Scholars use GIS technology to open new opportunities | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

When you think of map-makers, you probably don't picture English professors, philosophers, or art historians ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Has 'smart' Songdo been a success? | BBC

Songdo, a smart city built from scratch on reclaimed land near Seoul, is often described as the world's first smart city but has it been a success? ... Less than 50% occupancy and 20% commercial take-up of space ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

The multiplexed metropolis | The Economist

The multiplexed metropolis | The Economist | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
EVEN thieves, it seems, now have a smartphone app. Makkie Klauwe (it means something like “easy pickings” in Amsterdam slang) reveals the city’s best places...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Weird and wonderful uses for open data - visualising 250 million protests and mapping electoral preferences | GvLoop

Weird and wonderful uses for open data - visualising 250 million protests and mapping electoral preferences | GvLoop | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
One of the interesting aspects about open data is how creatively it can be used to generate new insights, identify patterns and make information easier to abso…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

9 models to scale open data – past, present and future | EngagingCities

9 models to scale open data – past, present and future | EngagingCities | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The possibilities of open data have been enthralling us for 10 years.

 

I came to it through wanting to make Government really usable, to build sites like TheyWorkForYou.

 

But that excitement isn’t what matters in the end.

 

What matters is scale – which organisational structures will make this movement explode?

 

Whether by creating self-growing volunteer communities, or by generating flows of money.

 

This post quickly and provocatively goes through some that haven’t worked (yet!) and some that have....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

The Death and the Life of Smart Cities | Social Physics

Jane Jacobs' The Death and Life of Great American Cities is a classic, one every urban planning undergraduate has read and one I read approximately two months ago because I was too busy reading Max...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

“Test-Bed Urbanism” | Public Culture

“Test-Bed Urbanism” | Public Culture | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

There is a new New Atlantis rising from the sea. This is a city that, like the seventeenth-century utopia of Bacon’s imagination, is purported to support the future of science, art, and commerce. The forms of experiment and rationality that govern this territory are, however, distant from the enlightened reason and empirical experimentation of Bacon’s envisioned ideal society. This territory will be governed not by a concentrated group of advanced leaders but by a diffuse network of machines.  The city is called Songdo ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Electrifying Infrastructure: Conductive Concrete Brings Smart Cities Closer

Electrifying Infrastructure: Conductive Concrete Brings Smart Cities Closer | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

As reported by Txchnologist: Decking out infrastructure with wires and sensors is the goal of many future-leaning urban planners and architects who are working to realize the dream of a true smart city. Now, the interconnected hyper-reality of interactive skins on buildings and bridges that signal when they need fixing is moving one step closer to fruition.

Several research groups have developed and patented unique formulas for electrically conductive concrete, which could deice roadways, sense when infrastructure needs repairs or even create cyber-secure buildings. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

These Maps Can Predict The Future | FastCoExist

These Maps Can Predict The Future | FastCoExist | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
DigitalGlobe provides satellite images to Google Maps and U.S. intelligence agencies. Now the company wants to convince clients that its maps can...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

How Governments Should Release Open Data | TechPresident

How Governments Should Release Open Data | TechPresident | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

When releasing data, governments should know that format matters almost as much as content. If it is clean, well organized, complete and in a machine-readable format, even a nonprogrammer can make good use of it. A recent post from Craig Thomler, who blogs about eGovernment and Gov 2.0 in Australia, illustrates this point.

 

Thomler describes taking a basic data set – the expected polling places for the federal election – and transferring the information onto the map, which is more visually appealing and informative than a list of names and locations. The process sounds relatively simple, something anyone could manage after a bit of Googling ...

.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Nasdaq crash triggers fear of data meltdown | The Guardian

Nasdaq crash triggers fear of data meltdown | The Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Digital infrastructure exceeding limits of human control, industry experts warn.

 

A series of system crashes affecting Google, Amazon, Apple and Microsoft in the past fortnight has brought warnings that governments, banks and big business are over-reliant on computer networks that have become too complex.

The alarm was sounded by industry experts in the aftermath of a three-hour network shutdown that paralysed the operation of the Nasdaq stock market in New York on Thursday, on what should have been a quiet day of routine share trading on the exchange.

 

Jaron Lanier, the author and inventor of the concept of virtual reality, warned that digital infrastructure was moving beyond human control. He said: "When you try to achieve great scale with automation and the automation exceeds the boundaries of human oversight, there is going to be failure. That goes for governments, for consumer companies, for Google, or a big insurance company. It is infuriating because it is driven by unreasonable greed. In many cases, the systems that tend to fail, fail because of an attempt to make them run automatically with a minimal amount of human oversight." ....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Big Data + Old History (Irish immigrants in C19th London)

Adam Crymble describes his thesis of using Computer Science methods for historical analysis of Irish Immigrants in 19th century London, England..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Data Broker Discloses What It Knows | Wall Street Journal

Data Broker Discloses What It Knows | Wall Street Journal | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
America’s largest data broker Acxiom launched AboutTheData.com, a website where users can plug in their name and social security number and peer into Acxiom’s troves of consumer data.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Technology could help rural areas become thriving and sustainable | The Guardian

Technology could help rural areas become thriving and sustainable | The Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
As city populations swell, rural communities will get left behind unless there are improvements in infrastructure, connectivity and resilience, writes Flemmich Webb
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Three Paradoxes of Big Data | Stanford Law Review

Three Paradoxes of Big Data | Stanford Law Review | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Introduction Big data is all the rage. Its proponents tout the use of sophisticated analytics to mine large data sets for insight as the solution to many of our society’s problems ...

more...
Matthew Hanchard's curator insight, September 6, 2013 10:57 AM

Great article on Big data, highlighting the three main topics of debates (paradoxes): Transparency of analyses (supposedly) Vs. Closed datasets and methods of analysis; Sovereignty of Identity Vs. Indentification through anaylsis of big data; Issue of power in information and data product ownership.

Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

The Moving City | Smart Cities - online book by Riccardo Maria Pulselli on urban kinetics

The Moving City | Smart Cities - online book by Riccardo Maria Pulselli on urban kinetics | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Riccardo Maria Pulselli from the Ecodynamics Group at the University of Siena has put his fascinating book on urban kinetics online. Click here to view. In it he demonstrates that cities are never in equilibrium, they are always changing, and never still. This is part of the liquid life that now characterizes modernity and it is central and essential to the digital world we have entered. To experience this point of view, read through.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

"Against the smart city" teaser | Adam Greenfield

The following is section 4 of "Against the smart city," the first part of The City Is Here For You To Use. Our Do projects will be publishing "Against the smart city" in stand-alone POD pamphlet an...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Smart cities will need big data - Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) | Physics Today

Smart cities will need big data - Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) | Physics Today | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
A new center at New York University (NYU) will be among the largest efforts thus far to bring big data to bear on learning about and improving the dynamics of big cities. The university’s Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) aims to take the pulse of New York City through a wide range of sensors and sift through the resulting torrent of information to improve life in Gotham. Other centers of urban informatics have cropped up in the US and abroad. For example, two programs are under way at MIT, and the University of Chicago is collaborating with the host city on urban renewal and neighborhood stabilization. The port city of Santander, Spain, has been instrumented with thousands of stationary and mobile sensors, and the Live Singapore! program is providing residents of that city-state with real-time transportation visualizations. Still, Steven Koonin, the physicist who is director of CUSP, says the center stands alone in terms of scale. At full strength, it will have a budget of $70 million from a combination of federal, state, and city agency support; industry funding; philanthropic donations; tuition; and NYU investments. From an inaugural class of 25 master’s students this fall, CUSP is committed to grow to 430 master’s and 100 PhD students over a decade.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Citizen science as seen by scientists: Methodological, epistemological and ethical dimensions | Public Understanding of Science

Citizen science as a way of communicating science and doing public engagement has over the past decade become the focus of considerable hopes and expectations. It can be seen as a win–win situation, where scientists get help from the public and the participants get a public engagement experience that involves them in real and meaningful scientific research. In this paper we present the results of a series of qualitative interviews with scientists who participated in the ‘OPAL’ portfolio of citizen science projects that has been running in England since 2007: What were their experiences of participating in citizen science? We highlight two particular sets of issues that our participants have voiced, methodological/epistemological and ethical issues. While we share the general enthusiasm over citizen science, we hope that the research in this paper opens up more debate over the potential pitfalls of citizen science as seen by the scientists themselves.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Citizen science versus NIMBY? | Ethan Zuckerman

Citizen science versus NIMBY? | Ethan Zuckerman | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

There are ten graduate students associated with the Center for Civic Media, half a dozen staff and a terrific set of MIT professors who mentor, coach, advise and lead research. But much of the work that’s most exciting at our lab comes from affiliates, who include visiting scholars from other universities, participants in the Media Lab Director’s fellows program and fellow travelers who work closely with our team.

Two of those Civic affiliates are Sean Bonner and Pieter Franken of Safecast. Safecast is a remarkable project born out of a desire to understand the health and safety implications of the release of radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the wake of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Unsatisfied with limited and questionable information about radiation released by the Japanese government, Joi Ito, Peter, Sean and others worked to design, build and deploy GPS-enabled geiger counters which could be used by concerned citizens throughout Japan to monitor alpha, beta and gamma radiation and understand what parts of Japan have been most effected by the Fukushima disaster.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

A Visual Guide To New York City's Massive Data Trove | PopSci

A Visual Guide To New York City's Massive Data Trove | PopSci | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The NYC Open Data initiative has dumped a ton of New York public records--school test scores, court districts, even laundromat maps--on one
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Skolkovo: Tech city that aims to restore nation's pride | BBC

Skolkovo: Tech city that aims to restore nation's pride | BBC | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

In the Soviet era, Russian science was lavished with money and resources. But post-communism, innovation has slumped. Can a new tech city reverse its fortunes?

 

Sitting on 400 hectares of the most expensive Russian real estate outside central Moscow, Skolkovo is intended to be one of the biggest tech innovation centres in the world. In 2010, then-president Dmitry Medvedev gave orders to create an innovative centre from scratch – this in a country where all tech parks and scientific centres have been inherited from the Soviet past. “We have money but don’t have our Silicon Valley,” he said on his visit to Silicon Valley, after earlier stressing it was a project “that should become the largest test ground for Russian new economic policy.” ....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

How data is changing the car game for Ford | Gigaom

How data is changing the car game for Ford | Gigaom | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The advent of big data is affecting Ford Motor Co. in some significant ways, from how it analyzes its supply chain to the features it puts into its cars.

 

When most people think about how cars are built, they probably think about assembly lines, manufacturing robots, and batteries of safety and performance simulations on massive supercomputers. But at Ford, big data is having a significant impact on the parts and features of those cars before they’re ever part of a design file. From the cars in stock at the dealership to the performance of the engine in a rainstorm, big data is infiltrating nearly every aspect of the Ford experience and the company itself. ...

more...
No comment yet.