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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
Curated by Rob Kitchin
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Why the world’s governments are interested in creating hubs for open data | Gigaom

Amid the tech giants and eager startups that have camped out in East London’s trendy Shoreditch neighborhood, the Open Data Institute is the rare nonprofit on the block that talks about feel-good sorts of things like “triple-bottom line” and “social and environmental value.” In fact, I first met ODI’s CEO Gavin Starks because he used to run AMEE, a startup that builds software for environmental data, and he was one of our first speakers at GigaOM’s early green conferences.

 

But ODI, which officially launched last October with funding from the U.K. government, is a private company and philanthropy isn’t its dominant aim. ODI helps companies, entrepreneurs and governments find value in the explosion of open data, and it seems to be starting to gain commercial success like a savvy street vendor selling hot cakes. ...

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Funding bodies will have to force scientists to share data

Funding bodies will have to force scientists to share data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The open access movement is forcing publishers to take down paywalls, making publicly funded research available to the public for free. But beyond that a more important development is pacing in the wings – that of open data.

With open access the issue has been free access to the results of scientific work. However, by “results” researchers really mean published papers which, bluntly, are only what scientists write about after looking at their data. With the open data drive, advocates are saying that the actual raw data should be available too. Anyone could then pick over, explore and re-use the data. This shift represents a behavioural sea-change that will also fix some substantial threats to the integrity of science.

The benefits of open data are clear. First, just the knowledge that the raw data will be out there for other analysts to check may make researchers more responsible about their data. Second, there is vast potential in the re-use of data. Researchers sometimes invest large amount of resources in collecting data only to publish one slice of that before having to move on to new projects.

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Is it Mass Surveillance or just Big Data? Kirsty Hughes on LSE Blog

Is it Mass Surveillance or just Big Data? Kirsty Hughes on LSE Blog | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

States, and companies, collecting huge amounts of data on people and populations around the world. Index on Censorship CEO Kirsty Hughes poses the question: Is this a mass surveillance nightmare – the digital Stasi roaming free – or just big data and we should get over it?

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Big Data Not Big Enough? How the Digital Divide Leaves People Out | PBS

Big Data Not Big Enough? How the Digital Divide Leaves People Out | PBS | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

However, one problem no one seems to be talking about is that Big Data is too small.

That may sound like a contradiction, what with the kajillions of information bytes that makes it not just data but “Big” data. Indeed, digital technology has enabled researchers to access, store and analyze unprecedented massive amounts of data, often online.

But Big Data is too small when it is amassed, scraped and API’ed from the Internet, whether from tweets or Google searches. The problem is the digital divide.

Specifically, people with lower levels of income and education are not accessing or creating online content nearly as much as people with a college degree and a comfortable middle-class lifestyle. That means if journalists, academics and policy makers rely on Big Data analytics, then they are ignoring issues important to many poor and working-class people.

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ICT to Transform Transportation as a Prelude to Smart Cities | Frost & Sullivan

Convergences among transportation, energy, and cities will become reality as new technologies emerge to enable a more efficient and sustainable delivery of services consumed in an urban setting. ICT can enable the smooth flow of information, money, and energy among different devices, stakeholders, and systems to bring about positive experiences for citizens. It is also through ICT that services consumed in a community will change and thus create new opportunities via revenue streams. By targeting the efficiencies that can be gained through efficient transport systems in a city, ICT tools can become a catalyst for a city to become smarter and sustainable. ...

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After Mobile - The Smarter City - Forbes

After Mobile - The Smarter City - Forbes | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
After Mobile - The Smarter City
Forbes
So it is hardly surprising that South Korea would be among the first countries to attempt to mine the power of the internet to create smarter cities.
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The Limits of Big Data: Fishing in a sea of numbers | The European

The Limits of Big Data: Fishing in a sea of numbers | The European | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Data cannot predict the way we humans act and think – and neither should it.
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Video: Simon Giles (Accenture) on Developing Intelligent Cities and Sustainable Urban Spaces | IIEA

Simon Giles discussed the opportunities presented by 'Smart' cities -- urban spaces that harness the latest ICT developments to deliver more efficient and sustainable services and infrastructure. From electric cars to e-health services to energy-efficient buildings that use 'smart' meters, intelligent cities comprise a wide range of innovations that can be of enormous environmental and economic benefit.. ...

 

Simon Giles is Accenture's global lead for Intelligent Cities Strategy and is currently advising cities, government and developers on economic development, citizen centered design and digital masterplanning.

 

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Counting the Internet of things in real time: c|net

Counting the Internet of things in real time:  c|net | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

For extreme numbers people who might want to track things as they connect to the Internet, Cisco created the Internet of Everything Connections Counter.

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Dis-locative arts: mobile media and the politics of global positioning | David Pinder

Dis-locative arts: mobile media and the politics of global positioning | David Pinder | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Questions about what it means to locate and be located are being significantly reconfigured through the digitalization of urban life and space, and as computer processing becomes embedded or ‘pervasive’ in urban environments. With position becoming increasingly automatically monitored and tracked within a standardized space and time, some critics suggest that it becomes less consciously thought about than part of a ‘technological unconscious’. Emblematic in this regard is the global positioning system (GPS), which is often promised to resolve questions of location definitively. This paper focuses on efforts by artists working within the realm of locative media to appropriate, reframe and repurpose GPS so as to question aspects of positioning technologies as well as their targeting of locations and their subjects. Attention centres on how these practices are embedded within a context of urban militarization and securitization, and how they may be complicit with military and corporate interests. But asserting the need to move beyond generalized condemnatory or celebratory accounts of the kind that have characterized much discussion in the field, the paper focuses on specific cases to draw out their dis-locative dimensions whereby they unsettle, unfix and reimagine forms of locating and being located. If political claims on their behalf are not secured in advance, critical potential is nevertheless found in the ambiguities, disturbances and resistances they hold open.

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Smart City 1.10: Smart City Examples | strathmorepark

Smart City 1.10: Smart City Examples | strathmorepark | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Internationally, and particularly in Europe, a number of Smart City initiatives are taking shape. This chapter looks at a handful of those cities and the projects that are underway to create Smart Cities.
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Why you should never trust a data scientist

Why you should never trust a data scientist | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The wonderful thing about being a data scientist is that I get all of the credibility of genuine science, with none of the irritating peer review or reproducibility worries. My first taste of this was my Facebook friends connection map. The underlying data was sound, derived from 220m public profiles. The network visualization of drawing lines between the top ten links for each city had issues, but was defensible. The clustering was produced by me squinting at all the lines, coloring in some areas that seemed more connected in a paint program, and picking silly names for the areas. I thought I was publishing an entertaining view of some data I’d extracted, but it was treated like a scientific study. A New York Times columnist used it as evidence that the US was perilously divided. White supremacists dug into the tool to show that Juan was more popular than John in Texan border towns, and so the country was on the verge of being swamped by Hispanics. What was worse, I couldn’t even get my data into the hands of reputable sociologists, thanks to concerns from Facebook. ...

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Europe's first carbon neutral neighborhood; Malmo - Smart Cities - BBC Horizons

Adam Shaw discovers how the Swedish city of Malmö has created Europe's first carbon neutral neighbourhood. More Horizons here http://www.bbc.com/horizonsbusi...
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Big data, analytics and the Internet of Buildings | GreenBiz

Big data, analytics and the Internet of Buildings | GreenBiz | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
From the Internet, to the Internet of Things, to the Internet of Buidlings.
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Beyond counting cars: Transportation planners embrace big data

Beyond counting cars: Transportation planners embrace big data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Want to know where the worst congestion is on area roads? Poll drivers, through their GPS units. ...

 

At her desk in Harrisburg, planner Jamie Lemon taps a few keys and on the screen, a map of the midstate starts to populate with yellow and red dots.  Each one is a congestion point, based on hundreds if not thousands of measurements by anonymous drivers. The data are collected through the GPS units sitting on commuters' and truckers' dashboards. The companies that sell those GPS units — and provide the satellite service — collect anonymous user data on an aggregate level. ...

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BKLYNR | Block by Block, Brooklyn’s Past and Present

BKLYNR | Block by Block, Brooklyn’s Past and Present | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
In-depth stories about Brooklyn — all of Brooklyn.

Via giorgialupi
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gitbew's comment, October 24, 2013 1:58 AM
Exceptional...!!
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Big Data Troves Stay Forbidden to Social Scientists | NY Times

Big Data Troves Stay Forbidden to Social Scientists | NY Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

PALO ALTO, Calif. — When scientists publish their research, they also make the underlying data available so the results can be verified by other scientists.  At least that is how the system is supposed to work. But lately social scientists have come up against an exception that is, true to its name, huge.

It is “big data,” the vast sets of information gathered by researchers at companies like Facebook, Google and Microsoft from patterns of cellphone calls, text messages and Internet clicks by millions of users around the world. Companies often refuse to make such information public, sometimes for competitive reasons and sometimes to protect customers’ privacy. But to many scientists, the practice is an invitation to bad science, secrecy and even potential fraud.

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Cities of Big Data: Seattle gets more from less power -- GCN

Cities of Big Data: Seattle gets more from less power -- GCN | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
With sensors and advanced analytics tied together within a cloud infrastructure, the city is looking to cut downtown power use by 10 to 25 percent.
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Paper: Location and Tracking of Mobile Devices: Überveillance Stalks the Streets | Michael & Clarke

During the last decade, location-tracking and monitoring applications have proliferated, in mobile cellular and wireless data networks, and through self-reporting by applications running in smartphones that are equipped with onboard global positioning system (GPS) chipsets. It is now possible to locate a smartphone-user's location not merely to a cell, but to a small area within it. Innovators have been quick to capitalise on these location-based technologies for commercial purposes, and have gained access to a great deal of sensitive personal data in the process. In addition, law enforcement utilise these technologies, can do so inexpensively and hence can track many more people. Moreover, these agencies seek the power to conduct tracking covertly, and without a judicial warrant. This article investigates the dimensions of the problem of people-tracking through the devices that they carry. Location surveillance has very serious negative implications for individuals, yet there are very limited safeguards. It is incumbent on legislatures to address these problems, through both domestic laws and multilateral processes.

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There are 10 billion objects connected to the internet all of them producing data | The Guardian

There are 10 billion objects connected to the internet all of them producing data | The Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
With 10bn physical objects connected to the internet, IT organisations need to prepare policies and processes now to ensure their networks and data remain secure
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Theorizing the geoweb | Article by @agaleszczynski and @wilsonism in GeoJournal

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Special issue of Computer on Big Data

Special issue of Computer on Big Data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

We can live with many of the uncertainties of big data for now, with the hope that its benefits will outweigh its harms, but we shouldn't blind ourselves to the possible irreversibility of changes — whether good or bad — to society.

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City Slickers: 5 Books About The Urban Experience - NPR

City Slickers: 5 Books About The Urban Experience - NPR | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
NPR
City Slickers: 5 Books About The Urban Experience
NPR
At the NPR Cities Project, we've spent much of the summer reading, breathing, reporting on urban innovation.
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Smart Streets Soon Will Know You're Walking On Them | Forbes

Smart Streets Soon Will Know You're Walking On Them | Forbes | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Cities are using microradar to identify bicyclists on their streets, and they may soon be detecting pedestrians, too, as the nation's transportation agencies follow a public migration away from the automobile and toward alternate modes of transportation...

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