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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
Curated by Rob Kitchin
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Exploring the Landscape of Smart Urbanism in Philadelphia | Everyday Structure

Exploring the Landscape of Smart Urbanism in Philadelphia | Everyday Structure | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

In this essay I examine Philadelphia’s engagement with the smart city concept through two interconnected projects, the Digital On-Ramps workforce development efforts that originated from consultation IBM's Smarter Cities Challenge provided, and the city’s economic branding and marketing efforts “Philadelphia: Smart City, Smart Choice” (pdf). My overall argument is that, while there will likely be many productive outcomes of both projects--new industries and jobs in those new industries for marginalized city residents--through these new, technologically-mediated forms of civic engagement and economic promotion, the greater utility of the ‘smart city’ is to present Philadelphia as an innovative, competitive node in the global economy. ...

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Cisco and Nice say bonjour to a smarter city

Cisco and Nice say bonjour to a smarter city | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
This vacation hotspot in the French Riviera is connecting wireless senors to enhance parking, lighting and environmental monitoring.
 
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Sizing Up Big Data, Broadening Beyond the Internet

Sizing Up Big Data, Broadening Beyond the Internet | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Internet companies were just the start. Virtually every field, from science to sports to public health, is being transformed by data-driven discovery and decision-making.
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Connecting the dots, missing the story: Big Data and the End of “Why?” | Slate

Connecting the dots, missing the story: Big Data and the End of “Why?” | Slate | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Could Big Data have prevented 9/11? Perhaps—Dick Cheney, for one, seems to think so. But let's consider another, far more provocative question: What if 9/11 happened today, in the era of Big Data, making it all but inevitable that all the 19 hijackers had extensive digital histories?

 

It used to be that one's propensity for terrorism was measured in books or sermons. Today, it's measured in clicks. It's not that books or sermons no longer matter—they still do—it's just today they are consumed digitally, in a way that leaves a trail. And that trail allows us to establish patterns. Are the books you bought on Amazon today more radical than the books you bought last month? If so, you might be a person of interest. ...

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Aussie farmers take a byte out of Big Data: Internet of cows, sheep and oysters

Aussie farmers take a byte out of Big Data: Internet of cows, sheep and oysters | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Forget the Internet of Things, this week we are all about the Internet of cows, sheep and oysters!From monitoring soil moisture to measuring oyster heartbeats, we have just released a new research ...
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Smart Cities Council - a lobby group for the adoption of smart city tech

Smart Cities Council - a lobby group for the adoption of smart city tech | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
We envision a world where digital technology and intelligent design have been harnessed to create smart, sustainable cities with high-quality living and high-quality jobs.
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Big Data & Smart Cities. The Smart City of the Future (video) | SmartData Collective

Big Data & Smart Cities.  The Smart City of the Future (video) | SmartData Collective | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

In South Korea, the smart city of Songdo, the world’s first ‘City in a Box,’ will be ready in 2015.  It encompasses 1.500 acres of reclaimed land in South Korea and it will be a revolution in city design. Located just 40 miles from Seoul and 7 miles from Incheon International Airport. Songo will have commercial office spaces, retail shops, residences, hotels as well as civic and cultural facilities spread out over 100 million square foot. A consortium of partners consisting of Cisco, 3M, Posco E&C and United Technology are currently developing the city of Songdo. ...

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From Campaign War Room to Big-Data Broom | New York Times

From Campaign War Room to Big-Data Broom | New York Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
By merging voter files with information scoured from the Web, political candidates hope to be able to closely tailor their appeals to each potential supporter.
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Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world | CNet

One of the first things I did when I visited London a few years ago was to go on a Sherlock Holmes walking tour. I'm not the only avid reader compelled to seek out the real-life settings found in books. This desire is what has brought about Placing Literature, an interactive site dedicated to plotting scenes from books onto real-world maps. It's like a heady mixture of a database, Google Maps, and the efforts of a bunch of literature geeks.

Placing Literature started with a conversation between co-founders Andrew Bardin Williams (an author) and his sister-in-law Kathleen Colin Williams (a geographer). "I use a lot of real-world locations in my novels. We decided there was this great intersection between geography and literature that hadn't been explored before," says Andrew Bardin Williams.

The site has been in development over the past six months thanks to a $10,000 grant from the Arts Council of Greater New Haven. Software engineer and former Googler Steven Young came on board to apply his technical know-how to working with Google Maps and building up the technology side of the site.

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Masters in Smart Cities, University of Girona

www.udg.edu/masters
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G8 Open Data Charter | gov.uk

G8 Open Data Charter | gov.uk | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Policy paper

G8 Open Data Charter and Technical Annex

Published 18 June 2013

ContentsPrinciple 1: Open Data by DefaultPrinciple 2: Quality and QuantityPrinciple 3: Usable by AllPrinciple 4: Releasing Data for Improved GovernancePrinciple 5: Releasing Data for InnovationTechnical annex
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Timelapse satellite images of whole Earth 1984-2012 | TIME.com

Timelapse satellite images of whole Earth 1984-2012 | TIME.com | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years. 

 

Type in the location of a place to see how the land-use has changed over time.

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Big Data, Thick Descrption and Political Expediency | Huff Post

It's hard to escape the trap of Big Data these days. In the current issue of The Week, for example, the cover headline reads: "Trapped in Big Data: The debate over surveillance, privacy and national security." The National Security Agency (NSA) revelations have brought into relief just how much personal data is routinely mined not only by federal, state and local governments, but also by corporations. The seemingly limitless records of our e-mails, phone calls, purchases, travels and current locations are used to pitch products and services. If we are to believe the NSA, these data have also been used to foil terrorist plots.

 

The NSA revelations have unleashed a spirited political debate about the costs and benefits of Big Data collection and analysis. NSA defenders, including President Obama, suggest that the state must tread "lightly" on our rights to privacy in order to keep us safe. Critics suggest that government thirst for Big Data is the first step toward an authoritarian state in America.

 

Beyond the important debates about privacy and the constitutionality of NSA snooping, there is one issue that has received less attention -- the usefulness of Big Data. In a recent Ethnography Matters blog, cultural sociologist Tricia Wang, who writes about the human dimensions of technology, describes the use and misuse of Big Data ...

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New journal: Journal of Data Mining & Digital Humanities

New journal: Journal of Data Mining & Digital Humanities | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Data mining, an interdisciplinary subfield of computer science, involving the methods at the intersection of artificial intelligence, machine learning and database systems. The Journal of Data Mining & Digital Humanities concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities, with tools provided by computing such as data visualisation, information retrieval, statistics, text mining by publishing scholarly work beyond the traditional humanities. ...

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davidgibson's curator insight, June 27, 2013 9:21 PM

Note the HASTAC emblem associated - so this must be good!

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The beauty is in the big data

The beauty is in the big data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Analysed data cannot only be valuable it can also be extremely beautiful. Sometimes data gets explained with stunning visualizations.
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8 Ways To Open Up Civic Data So That People Actually Use It

8 Ways To Open Up Civic Data So That People Actually Use It | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Government has been one of the slowest sectors to embrace the Internet and open data, but it’s starting to happen. Incubators like Code for America are teaching entrepreneurs to develop civic-minded apps.
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Funding bodies will have to force scientists to share data | The Conversation

The open access movement is forcing publishers to take down paywalls, making publicly funded research available to the public for free. But beyond that a more important development is pacing in the wings – that of open data.

 

With open access the issue has been free access to the results of scientific work. However, by “results” researchers really mean published papers which, bluntly, are only what scientists write about after looking at their data. With the open data drive, advocates are saying that the actual raw data should be available too. Anyone could then pick over, explore and re-use the data. This shift represents a behavioural sea-change that will also fix some substantial threats to the integrity of science. ...

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No Prediction Error - Your Zip Code and Last Two Transactions Will Nail Who You Are ...

No Prediction Error - Your Zip Code and Last Two Transactions Will Nail Who You Are ... | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Why do merchants sometimes ask us for our ZIP code when we buy something? ...

 

In one of their brochures, direct marketing services company Harte-Hanks describes the GeoCapture service they offer retail businesses as follows: “Users simply capture name from the credit card swipe and request a customer’s ZIP code during the transaction. GeoCapture matches the collected information to a comprehensive consumer database to return an address.”  In a promotional brochure, they claim accuracy rates as high as 100%.

 

Fair Isaac Corp., a company best known for its FICO credit scores, also offers a similar service which they say can boost direct marketing efforts by as much as 400%. “FICO Contact Builder helps you overcome the common challenges of gathering contact information from shoppers—such as complicating or jeopardizing the sales process by asking for an address or phone number, or complying with regulations,” it says. “It requires minimal customer information captured at point-of-sale, just customer name or telephone number and the customer or store ZIP code.” ...


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Silicon Valley long has had ties to military, intelligence agencies

Silicon Valley long has had ties to military, intelligence agencies | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley has what U.S. military and intelligence agencies want: cutting-edge technology and online services that people all over the world use to communicate and share information.
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In More Cities, A Camera On Every Corner, Park And Sidewalk | VPR

In More Cities, A Camera On Every Corner, Park And Sidewalk | VPR | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

This report is part of the series NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century. Surveillance cameras, and the sophisticated software packages that go with.  

 

Surveillance cameras, and the sophisticated software packages that go with them, have become big business. Many small- and medium-sized cities across American are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on cameras and software to watch their residents.

 

These systems use some of the same kinds of technology the New York Police Department has deployed in lower Manhattan to catch terrorists. But many cities are now using the technology for policing as mundane as preventing vandalism at parks.

 

A case in point: Elk Grove, Calif. Elk Grove is a sleepy suburb of Sacramento with a modest crime rate. It's bordered to the south and west by wide-open ranch land. Last week I found myself sitting on a swing in Miwok Park, watching toddlers, kids and dog walkers. It couldn't have been a sleepier scene.

 

Nonetheless, I was being watched. There was a camera right above my head. ...

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Building operating system provides brain for smarter cities | Science Daily

Building operating system provides brain for smarter cities | Science Daily | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

A new digital building operating system integrates all building operating systems into one, easy-to-use cockpit control interface for desktops and portable devices.

 

Innovative technology developed by Columbia Engineering's Center for Computational Learning Systems (CCLS) is the driving force -- in effect, the brain -- behind Di-BOSS™, a new digital building operating system that integrates all building operating systems into one, easy-to-use cockpit control interface for desktops and portable devices, including laptops, tablets, and smart phones. This new machine learning technology, known as Total Property Optimizer (TPO), combines the need to provide comfort and safety for large building managers and tenants with situational awareness, energy savings, and re-commissioning (continuous optimal performance), and provides the smart analytics and communications needed for real-time operations. ...

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Streetlights Can Do That? An Entrepreneur Creates Smarter Cities | Wired.com

Streetlights Can Do That? An Entrepreneur Creates Smarter Cities |  Wired.com | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
What do music, the iPhone and Hurricane Katrina have to do with streetlights? If you are Ron Harwood, everything. Ron is the inventor of Intellistreets, an LED street light system that goes way beyond simply lighting our streets.
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Federal open data portal revamp aims to encourage apps in Canada | CBC News

Federal open data portal revamp aims to encourage apps in Canada | CBC News | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The federal government has revamped its data portal in an effort to encourage the development of innovative apps that make use of the publicly accessible federal government data on topics ranging from housing to air quality.

 

"Open Data is Canada's new natural resource," said Treasury Board President Tony Clement in a statement, as the government officially relaunched its data.gc.ca portal Tuesday afternoon in Toronto. ...

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Can Lagos Be a Smart City? | AllAfrica

Equally interesting are the programmes launched by some of the world's leading ICT firms, in living xperience is digitalized when fully functional. I speak of Cisco's Internet of Things, SAP's Enterprise Asset Management, and IBM's Smarter Cities Challenge, as examples. If here, we could adopt one or all of these programmes and bring them to impact on our infrastructure system, then we could leapfrog into the comity of advanced nations and achieve Vision 20-2020 in real time.

 

The IBM Smarter Cities Challenge is here with us as the firm has begun marketing its potentials to relevant markets. Launched in 2011, the IBM Smarter Cities Challenge is a three-year, 100-city, US$50 million competitive grant programme. It is IBM's single-largest CSR effortthrough which the firm assigns a team of six top experts to each winning city to study a key issue identified by the city's leadership. ...

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After Snowden, a defense of Big Data | The Boston Globe

After Snowden, a defense of Big Data |  The Boston Globe | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

A few years ago, New York City set up a “geek squad” tasked with analyzing vast amounts of data to improve the way the city runs. 

 

It used information from utility companies to identify which buildings lost power after a storm; data from sprinkler systems to find those most vulnerable to fire; geospatial data from sewers to figure out which restaurants were clogging pipes with illegally dumped grease.

 

New York is at the forefront of the “Big Data Revolution,” which could usher in one of the greatest societal changes of our lifetime. Vast amounts of digital information are being put to creative, problem-solving use. Google can help predict flu outbreaks by mining data about where people are looking up symptoms. Real-time information from commuters’ smart phones can help urban planners design better transportation systems. The number of UPS packages can detect an upswing in the economy.

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Rob Kitchin's comment, June 18, 2013 10:48 AM
"So the issue is not really how to protect privacy in the age of Big Data. Privacy, in the old fashioned sense, is already gone. The question now is: How can we be sure that the Big Data out there on us will be used only for good?" - An attempt to shift the terrain of the debate away from Fourth Amendment.