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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
Curated by Rob Kitchin
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Wearables Are Totally Failing the People Who Need Them Most | WIRED

Wearables Are Totally Failing the People Who Need Them Most | WIRED | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Fitness tracking companies need to start embracing the FDA and making devices and apps for the old, the chronically ill, and the poor.
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Smart city sensors ready for roll out, Casey tells Web Summit | Irish Times

Smart city sensors ready for roll out, Casey tells Web Summit | Irish Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
We have put sensors on 40 bikes in Dublin and right now they are feeding back to us data about pollution, traffic congestion, you name it, says PCH boss
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Using the Internet of Everything to build Africa's smart cities of the future | memeburn

Using the Internet of Everything to build Africa's smart cities of the future | memeburn | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Today, only 1% of all things are connected in our world. In the next ten years, this number will increase dramatically -- and with that -- enabled societies to create smart cities.

 

With the world moving more and more towards the Internet of Everything (IoE), it’s a space that’s only going to get more valuable. In fact, it’s estimated that right now, it’s worth about US$19-trillion. Africa meanwhile has a potential value space of US$500-million. That’s the equivalent of estimated revenue generated with South Africa’s World Cup four years ago.

 

It’s understandable then that networking conglomerate Cisco is pretty excited about IoE. At the recent Cisco Connect 2014 South Africa, event it outlined how IoE could massively benefit Africa as it starts to build smart cities. ...

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Qcut wants to make you the perfect pair of jeans using data and algorithms | The Verge

Qcut wants to make you the perfect pair of jeans using data and algorithms | The Verge | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

It's puzzling how difficult it can be to find a pair of jeans that fits you properly — and that seems to be particularly true for women. 

 

Called Qcut, the project comes from a former Mozilla designer who's partnered with a veteran of the fashion industry. Qcut is hoping to make jeans that'll come in around 400 different sizes, one of which it should be able to automatically determine as the proper fit for any woman who buys a pair. Qcut says it can do that using just five numbers, which you likely already know: your normal pants size, your height, your weight, your shoe size, and your bra size. ...

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Canary Wharf Group launches initiative for the development of new smart cities technologies - Cities Today

Canary Wharf Group launches initiative for the development of new smart cities technologies - Cities Today | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Canary Wharf Group has launched the Cognicity Challenge, an initiative that will enable the company to play a role in development of smart city technology
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Africa's smart cities - Iguacu

Africa's smart cities - Iguacu | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

African cities are well-positioned to leap frog the development of global ‘smart cities’.


The concept of ‘smart cities’ has become synonymous with high-tech urban innovation in developed countries, where technology-based solutions leverage existing infrastructure in innovative ways to solve the daily challenges of city life. However, the concept is more than about employing advanced technologies. Smart cities efficiently drive sustainable economic growth, competitiveness, prosperity and a better life for citizens through smart solutions.

 

Many African leaders – and increasingly many multinational companies – are starting to recognise the potential for uniquely African smart cities to join the top rank of global tech-centres.....

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Is your car spying on you? | BBC News

Is your car spying on you? | BBC News | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Modern cars are morphing into mobile data centres - connected, clever and packed full of sensors.

 

But are they also becoming spies in our drives?

 

As they record almost every aspect of our journeys and driving behaviour, interacting with our smartphone apps and sat-nav systems, who will own all the data they generate, how will it be used, and will our privacy inevitably be compromised? ...

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Smart city or ghost city? | Financial Express

IT’S THE world’s first purpose-built smart city and the largest private real estate development in the world. It’s called Songdo and it is located 40 miles outside South Korea’s capital Seoul. Those who participated in the recent Asian Games in Incheon may have some connection to Songdo. The official name of the smart city is Songdo Business District and it is built on land reclaimed from the sea on the Incheon waterfront. There has been much global interest in Songdo since Seoul itself is already one of the most hi-tech cities in the world, but Songdo is unique, being built as an integrated hi-tech and green city.  Songdo is described as a ‘global business hub’ with a variety of residential and retail developments. But at a cost of over $40 billion, questions are being asked about its viability and whether it can ever fulfill its conceptual ambitions. ...

 

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What’s real time analytics’ role in the smart building phenomenon? | Datawatch

What’s real time analytics’ role in the smart building phenomenon? | Datawatch | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Developing a fully-functional smart building starts with the Internet of Things and comes to life with data analysis software.
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City slicker: Data are slowly changing the way cities operate | Economist

City slicker: Data are slowly changing the way cities operate | Economist | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

WAITING for a bus on a drizzly winter morning is miserable. But for London commuters Citymapper, an app, makes it a little more bearable. Users enter their destination into a search box and a range of different ways to get there pop up, along with real-time information about when a bus will arrive or when the next Tube will depart. The app is an example of how data are changing the way people view and use cities. Local governments are gradually starting to catch up.

 

Nearly all big British cities have started to open up access to their data. On October 23rd the second version of the London Datastore, a huge trove of information on everything from crime statistics to delays on the Tube, was launched. In April Leeds City council opened an online “Data Mill” which contains raw data on such things as footfall in the city centre, the number of allotment sites or visits to libraries. Manchester also releases chunks of data on how the city region operates. ...

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Australian cities in no hurry to become smart | Sydney Morning Herald

Australian cities in no hurry to become smart | Sydney Morning Herald | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
As the high-tech ''connected city'' becomes reality around the world, local governments in Australia are taking the cautious route.
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FCC fines carriers $10 million for storing customer data in the open | engadget

FCC fines carriers $10 million for storing customer data in the open | engadget | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The FCC usually frets over issues like fair network access and next-generation technology, but it's now concerned about your privacy, too. The agency has just issued its first fines over data security, slapping phone carriers TerraCom and YourTel with a total of $10 million in penalties for storing their customer info in the clear. FCC officials claim that both of the budget-oriented providers stored addresses, Social Security numbers and other vital data not just online, but in a format that just about anyone could read. Moreover, they didn't even notify all of their 305,000 combined customers after realizing what they'd done wrong -- potentially, thieves could have abused this mistake before victims knew they were at risk. ...

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Chicago Will Use Sensors to Gather Data on City and its Residents - PSFK

Chicago Will Use Sensors to Gather Data on City and its Residents - PSFK | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Citizens of #Chicago, your city knows more than you know

 

In the near future, Chicago dwellers may not need to keep track of weather patterns, airborne allergens and even their own activity levels for themselves: a new initiative by the city seeks to farm various kinds of data from (and for the good of) its residents.

 

In the coming months, the University of Chicago, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory will begin hosting will a network of 40 sensor nodes on installed on lampposts. The project is one of the first waves of the Array of Things initiative, a collaborative effort to gather ambient data on how Chicago functions at various levels. Led by the University of Chicago’s Urban Center for Computational Data, the initiative seeks to use the data to better support, design, and manage the city; its team also hopes to expand the upcoming small-scale system to 1,000 sensors — enough to harness data on Chicago’s entire downtown Loop district — in the next few years, Wired notes.  ...

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Economics in the age of big data | Science

Economic science has evolved over several decades toward greater emphasis on empirical work. The data revolution of the past decade is likely to have a further and profound effect on economic research. Increasingly, economists make use of newly available large-scale administrative data or private sector data that often are obtained through collaborations with private firms, giving rise to new opportunities and challenges.

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What Happens When We Let Industry and Government Collect All the Data They Want | Slate

What Happens When We Let Industry and Government Collect All the Data They Want | Slate | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
In the fall of 1769, Thomas Jefferson lost a slave. His name was Sandy, and he was a runaway. Sandy was “about 35 years of age.” He worked as a shoemaker. Jefferson described him as “artful and knavish.” He was also “something of a horse jockey.”

 

Jefferson criticized slavery. Yet when he signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776, Jefferson owned almost 200 human beings. When Sandy went missing, he owned about 20; losing even one was significant. So Jefferson used the best available technology to find Sandy: the newspaper ad.

 

Sandy was caught and later sold for 100 pounds. Around the turn of the century, however, things slowly started to change. A secret network was built to help people like Sandy. Over time, tens of thousands of runaway slaves would escape bondage on the Underground Railroad.

 

How many of them would have made it in the age of big data? ...

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Vloasis's curator insight, November 7, 2014 3:20 PM

That f for s is kinda freaky.

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West Africa looks to smart cities technologies | BizTech Africa

West Africa looks to smart cities technologies | BizTech Africa | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
West African governments are showing increased interest in smart cities technology and the benefits they can offer citizens, says Cisco.
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EU commits €14.4m to support open data across Europe | Guardian

EU commits €14.4m to support open data across Europe | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
New funding for startups, research and academy hopes to fuel open-data skills and adoption through the Open Data Institute co-founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee. By Samuel Gibbs
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The Creepy New Wave of the Internet by Sue Halpern | NY Review of Books

The Creepy New Wave of the Internet by Sue Halpern | NY Review of Books | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Review essay about IoT and specifically these books.

The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalismby Jeremy RifkinPalgrave Macmillan, 356 pp., $28.00Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Thingsby David RoseScribner, 304 pp., $28.00Age of Context: Mobile, Sensors, Data and the Future of Privacyby Robert Scoble and Shel Israel, with a foreword by Marc BenioffPatrick Brewster, 225 pp., $14.45 (paper)More Awesome Than Money: Four Boys and Their Heroic Quest to Save Your Privacy from Facebookby Jim DwyerViking, 374 pp., $27.95
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Smart Cities of Tomorrow: As Built by the Construction Industry | ZBrella

Smart Cities of Tomorrow: As Built by the Construction Industry | ZBrella | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
  The future looks bright. We have a vision for the place we will live tomorrow: smart cities, smart communities, and more. But how? And who decides what it will look like? The answer doesn’t lie in our future, but in our present, today.   Thanks to modern advancements, the construction and technology industries have
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EU provides 8 million euros for ‘Smart Cities Project’ in Soma | Daily Sabah

EU provides 8 million euros for ‘Smart Cities Project’ in Soma | Daily Sabah | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The "Smart Cities Project," which was prepared for Manisa's Soma district, will receive the largest amount for projects in Turkey within the scope of the EU Framework Program for Research and Innovation. The EU will provide 8 million euros to the project,... | Daily Sabah
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Get hands-on to build smart cities: Modi | The Hindu

Get hands-on to build smart cities: Modi | The Hindu | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Narendra Modi is learnt to have asked the Union Urban Development Ministry to adopt a more “hands-on” approach while drafting the smart cities project.
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Barcodes, bank cards and digital TV: the secret numbers that run our lives | Guardian

Barcodes, bank cards and digital TV: the secret numbers that run our lives | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Stand-up mathematician Matt Parker explores the hidden numbers and patterns that keep our data safe and make our gadgets work
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Computation, Big Data, and the Future of Cities by Argonne National Laboratory on Livestream

Computation, Big Data, and the Future of Cities by Argonne National Laboratory on Livestream - Livestream.com

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London police using Big Data to tackle small crime | cloudtech

Small criminals are predictable, at least that's what London's Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) are hoping. New software, developed by Accenture, pulls large amounts of data in-use by the police service and puts it through an advanced analytics engine to predict when criminals are likely to strike.

 

The engine looks at aspects of an individual's record including; geography, past offenses, associations, and even keeps an eye on social media postings. Through analysis of five years' worth of data, a picture can be painted of when / if a criminal will re-offend. ...

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The Man Who’s Quantifying New York City | Pacific-Standard

The Man Who’s Quantifying New York City | Pacific-Standard | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Noah Davis talks to the proprietor of I Quant NY. His methodology: a little something called "addition.

 

Ben Wellington didn’t mean to start a data revolution. He just wanted to teach his students. As the visiting assistant professor in Pratt Institute’s City & Regional Planning program, he teaches a statistics course based on NYC Open Data, a repository of information provided by the city. After he started playing around with the data sets, he decided to launch a blog. I Quant NY features his discoveries—from the farthest Manhattan apartment from the subway to the fire hydrant that brought in the most ticket revenue—and has become something of a media sensation, even affecting policy. Wellington spoke with Pacific Standard about asking the right questions, the simplicity and power of summing, and why posts don’t need to be difficult. ...

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