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First smarten our cities, then build smart ones - Hindustan Times

First smarten our cities, then build smart ones - Hindustan Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
India’s cities are a shameful mess: the big, older ones, the small ones and even the fledgling new ones. Far from being anywhere near smart, our cities are rather dumb. The future could be bleaker, writes Sanjoy Narayan.
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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
Curated by Rob Kitchin
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Keeping the Pulse of the Planet: Using Big Data to Monitor Our Environment | TriplePundit

Keeping the Pulse of the Planet: Using Big Data to Monitor Our Environment | TriplePundit | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

What could be more important than keeping the pulse of the planet as a whole?

 

There is an opportunity for us to use this same insatiable desire to collect data for another good: environmental monitoring. Similar devices, equipped with environmental monitoring sensors such as temperature, carbon, or chemicals in the air or water can give us unprecedented information about a location’s, region’s or the planet’s overall health. In the event of an environmental disaster like a major spill, nuclear accident or volcanic eruption, we could have an instant characterization of short- and long-term impacts of that disaster on its surroundings. What could be more important than keeping the pulse of the planet as a whole? We may be able to derive more health benefits from such data than from personal monitoring. If you live in downtown Beijing, knowing about the quality of the air you breathe and the water you drink may help more with making health choices than any amount of monitored exercise. ...

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The Internet of Things and the Connected Person | WIRED

The Internet of Things and the Connected Person | WIRED | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
One of the interesting things about the Internet of Things (IoT): It’s not really about the things. The IoT is a developing technological marvel. It is estimated that by the year 2020, 50 to 100 billion devices will be electronically connected in the globally emerging IoT. But at the center of the innovation that is unfolding…
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Giving cities a road map to reducing their carbon footprint | Science Insider

Giving cities a road map to reducing their carbon footprint | Science Insider | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

New standards for measuring urban greenhouse gas emissions unveiled at climate summit.

 

Cities are not just where 3.5 billion of us live—they are where more than  half of humanity uses electricity, drives cars, and throws out garbage, among myriad other activities that emit greenhouse gases. Now, a global coalition has released the first standardized method for measuring and reporting a given city’s greenhouse gas emissions. Called the Global Protocol for Community-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventories (GPC), the new standards were unveiled today at the United Nations’ ongoing climate negotiations in Lima. ...

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Wire the desert: The next generation of smart cities | CNN

Wire the desert: The next generation of smart cities | CNN | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Forget Barcelona and Vancouver. A new generation of smart cities is on the rise.  The urban planning equivalent of a Rorschach test, a "Smart City" can be taken to mean almost anything.

 

But by the most popular criteria; sustainable energy and development, open data and government, and integrated information, communications and technology (ICT) serving wide areas of a city, these ultra-modern hubs are on the rise.

 

Industrial analysts IHS claim predict there will be 88 cities that fit the description by 2025, up from 21 today, taking in contenders far from the usual suspects of Vancouver and Barcelona. These dynamic new players hope to redraw the map. ...

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The truth about smart cities: ‘In the end, they will destroy democracy' | Guardian

The truth about smart cities: ‘In the end, they will destroy democracy' | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The smart city is, to many urban thinkers, just a buzzphrase that has outlived its usefulness: ‘the wrong idea pitched in the wrong way to the wrong people’. So why did that happen – and what’s coming in its place, asks Steven Poole
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Why the sharing economy needs the Internet of Things | Gigaom

Why the sharing economy needs the Internet of Things | Gigaom | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Organizations ranging from Zipcar to bike-sharing programs rely on remote unlocking and return of assets. Sharing economy companies that rely on individual assets need to do the same to compete on experience and drive member loyalty.
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Retinal Scans to Individualized Cosmetics: Big Data Biometrics | Syncsort

Retinal Scans to Individualized Cosmetics: Big Data Biometrics | Syncsort | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Biometrics has always relied on Big Data, but applications are becoming more numerous, various, and with correlations more ominous.
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Data sent between phones and smartwatches wide open to hackers | Ars Technica

Data sent between phones and smartwatches wide open to hackers | Ars Technica | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

All your text messages, calendar entries, and biometric data belongs to us.

 

The growing number of smart devices that interoperates with smartphones could leave text messages, calendar entries, biometric data, and other sensitive user information wide open to hackers, security researchers warn.

That's because most smart watches rely on a six-digit PIN to secure information traveling to and from connected Android smartphones. With only one million possible keys securing the Bluetooth connection between the handset and the smart device, the PINs are susceptible to brute-force attacks, in which a nearby hacker attempts every possible combination until finding the right one.

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Butterflies, Ants and the Internet of Things | WIRED

Butterflies, Ants and the Internet of Things | WIRED | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Buckminster Fuller once wrote, “there is nothing in the caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly.”  It’s true that often our capacity to look at things and truly understand their final form is very limited.  Nor can we necessarily predict what happens when many small changes combine – when small pebbles roll…
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John Presutti's curator insight, December 14, 9:11 AM

The IoT will have huge impact how we understand and communicate with consumers as our "things" will be doing a lot of the talking.

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Uber's data-sucking Android app is dangerously close to malware | Cult of Mac

Uber's data-sucking Android app is dangerously close to malware | Cult of Mac | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The Android version of the Uber app shares an unbelievable amount of data. So much that one observer calls it "literally malware.

 

Here’s the full list of all the data Uber is collecting through its Android app (we’re checking to see if the iOS version works the same way):

– Accounts log (Email)
– App Activity (Name, PackageName, Process Number of activity, Processed id)
– App Data Usage (Cache size, code size, data size, name, package name)
– App Install (installed at, name, package name, unknown sources enabled, version code, version name)
– Battery (health, level, plugged, present, scale, status, technology, temperature, voltage)
– Device Info (board, brand, build version, cell number, device, device type, display, fingerprint, IP, MAC address, manufacturer, model, OS platform, product, SDK code, total disk space, unknown sources enabled)
– GPS (accuracy, altitude, latitude, longitude, provider, speed)
– MMS (from number, MMS at, MMS type, service number, to number)
– NetData (bytes received, bytes sent, connection type, interface type)
– PhoneCall (call duration, called at, from number, phone call type, to number)
– SMS (from number, service number, SMS at, SMS type, to number)
– TelephonyInfo (cell tower ID, cell tower latitude, cell tower longitude, IMEI, ISO country code, local area code, MEID, mobile country code, mobile network code, network name, network type, phone type, SIM serial number, SIM state, subscriber ID)
– WifiConnection (BSSID, IP, linkspeed, MAC addr, network ID, RSSI, SSID)
– WifiNeighbors (BSSID, capabilities, frequency, level, SSID)
– Root Check (root status code, root status reason code, root version, sig file version)
– Malware Info (algorithm confidence, app list, found malware, malware SDK version, package list, reason code, service list, sigfile version)


Read more at http://www.cultofmac.com/304401/ubers-android-app-literally-malware/#gjQl5KPqkQJ8T3Iw.99
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Data from wearable devices could soon land you in jail - not covered by health privacy laws and can be supoenaed

Data from wearable devices could soon land you in jail - not covered by health privacy laws and can be supoenaed | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Data from a Fitbit wristband is being used in an insurance civil litigation case, but the ramifications of the legal fight are clear: A judge can subpoena data from a wearable device.

 

While that fitness band or smartwatch you own may help you get in shape or never miss an appointment, the data it collects is now also fodder for criminal or civil litigation.

 

In what's thought to be a first-of-its-kind civil lawsuit, a personal injury lawyer in Canada used data from a Fitbit wristband in an insurance fraud case to support his client's claims.

 

Previously, insurance civil suits relied on physician examinations and not historical data collected from a wearable. ...

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Tech companies and social networks need an ethics body to rebuild trust | Guardian

Tech companies and social networks need an ethics body to rebuild trust | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The internet is capable of enormous social good but users feel overly advertised to as well as tracked and monitored

 

Do you use a fitness tracker? Online banking? Do you shop online, use a messaging app, download music, use email, file your tax return online or let your children play games on your iPad?

 

How much do you trust the services and technologies you use?

Most of us will admit to a creeping sense of mistrust about the technology we have come to rely on. Many users have come to feel quietly contemptuous of these services, as if our default relationships with them is that they offer us a sheet of novel-length terms and conditions designed for us not to read and in return we agree to be advertised to, or about, or to be tracked and monitored, however ineffectively or, worse, to be surveilled by the government, and we grudgingly accept it and carry on. ....

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Open & smart cities for the common future | EC Digital Agenda for Europe

Open & smart cities for the common future | EC Digital Agenda for Europe | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Promoting open innovation and becoming ecosystem managers instead of service providers are two of the key elements cities need to embrace if they are to innovate and transform themselves into smart cities.  

 

The Open Cities and Commons for Europe projects seek to provide new solutions to these problems public administrations face. Coordinated by ESADE Business School, the ultimate goal of these European projects is to enable open innovation mechanisms in the public sector in seven European cities: Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin, Bologna, Helsinki, Paris and Rome....

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The Future of Privacy - large survey and report re. privacy in 2025 | PewResearch

The Future of Privacy - large survey and report re. privacy in 2025 | PewResearch | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Will governments and corporations expand current tracking policies? Or will innovators create new ways for individuals to control personal information? Experts are divided on whether a secure and balanced privacy-rights infrastructure will be in place by 2025.
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India’s ‘smart’ cities plan risks leaving millions behind | Livemint

India’s ‘smart’ cities plan risks leaving millions behind | Livemint | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

With the urban influx showing few signs of slowing, experts are sceptical of govt’s plans for high-tech, environmentally friendly cities.

 

As he pulled his family’s belongings from the rubble of his bulldozed home in the Indian capital, Rajesh Kumar was pessimistic about Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s plans to revolutionize the country’s stressed cities. “All these years, I have seen our city grow with many new roads, flyovers and a metro,” Kumar said of New Delhi. “But I haven’t seen anything change in our slum, only the population has grown,” said Kumar whose two-room shack home along with hundreds of others was suddenly demolished recently for encroaching on state forest land.

Read more at: http://www.livemint.com/Politics/Hm8PakJkEFBIMTE7M4jW0N/Indias-smart-cities-plan-risks-leaving-millions-behind.html?__scoop_post=9922eaf0-8539-11e4-bf93-90b11c3ead14&__scoop_topic=1086564#__scoop_post=9922eaf0-8539-11e4-bf93-90b11c3ead14&__scoop_topic=1086564&utm_source=copy
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HyperCities: Thick mapping in the digital humanities

HyperCities: Thick mapping in the digital humanities | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
HyperCities: Thick mapping in the digital humanities. By: Todd Presner, David Shepard, and Yoh Kawano with other contributions.
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Croke Park & Sun Devil stadium in Arizona testing ground for smart city apps | Irish Times

Croke Park & Sun Devil stadium in Arizona testing ground for smart city apps | Irish Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Have you ever been to a game and wished you could view a touchdown or goal from a better angle? Or wondered what your friends in other parts of the stadium are saying about it? Maybe you wanted to order a hamburger or a team shirt without leaving your seat?

 

A transatlantic collaboration between Dublin City University, Arizona State University (ASU), the GAA and Intel aims to make these fan experiences possible in the not-so-distant future.

 

The partnership will use Croke Park and ASU’s Sun Devil Stadium as living labs to test the capabilities of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies. ...

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The Internet Of Someone Else’s Things | TechCrunch

The Internet Of Someone Else’s Things | TechCrunch | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

petabytes of real-time data, which we will turn into new insights and efficiencies. It will doubtless save lives. Oh, yes: and it will subtly redefine ownership as we know it. You will no longer own many of the most expensive and sophisticated items you possess. You may think you own them. But you’ll be wrong.The Internet Of Things is coming. Rejoice! ...Mostly. It will open our collective eyes to petabytes of real-time data, which we will turn into new insights...

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Smart Cities Trade Mission to China Announced | Sustainable business

Smart Cities Trade Mission to China Announced | Sustainable business | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Green technologies from US companies will be promoted in China as part of the joint Climate-Smart/Low-Carbon Cities Initiative.
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How to Build a Holy Smart City | World Post

How to Build a Holy Smart City | World Post | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Picture an ancient city full of intricately carved stone temples, where millions of pilgrims and ascetics come to bathe in the holy waters of the Ganges, as Hindus have done for hundreds of generations. Monks wearing saffron robes, or even nothing at all, who have dedicated their lives to simplicity and sacrificed comfort and materialism in search of a higher knowledge. Now, imagine that the holy water of the Ganges is being monitored by electronic sensors to detect pollution levels, the lights illuminating the streets and houses of this city are fitted with motion sensors and calibrated to save energy, and the amount of pilgrims visiting each day is fed through an algorithm to adjust train schedules and ensure that buses and trains are neither overcrowded nor empty. All of these connected to a central nervous system. A holy smart city. ....

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Beyond the Smart City: Towards a New Paradigm | New Cities Foundation

Beyond the Smart City: Towards a New Paradigm | New Cities Foundation | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Mathieu Lefevre kicked off the session with a poll, determining how many times each audience member had touched their cell phone from the moment he or she woke up that day. He then classified cell phone technology as a big, small or medium-sized city’s latest utility, no different from water or electricity and with the same demands for easy accessibility and performance. Yet as encouraging as the ubiquity of technology is, especially in an urban environment, it can be freighted with its own set
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A Three-Pronged Approach to Urban Resilience | HuffPost

A Three-Pronged Approach to Urban Resilience | HuffPost | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

For years now, the American Society of Civil Engineers has been drawing attention to the dire state of America's roads, bridges, dams and water pipes, many of which are in urgent need of repair. Economists say that since the1960s in the U.S., public infrastructure spending as a share of GDP has shrunk to about half the European level.

 

The fact is that is most of us don't sit up and take notice until bridges actually collapse, pipes burst and sidewalks give way. Take what has been recently happening in Los Angeles. At the beginning of the month, the New York Times reported on yet another burst water main in the city. The paper wrote that this was not an isolated incident but rather the latest sign of a continuing deterioration in the city's public works skeleton. It went to comment, I quote, "Los Angeles' problems reflect the challenges many American cities face after years of recession-era belt tightening prompted them to delay basic maintenance....

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Copenhagen Lighting the Way to Greener, More Efficient Cities | NY Times

Copenhagen Lighting the Way to Greener, More Efficient Cities | NY Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Urban areas around the world are installing wireless networks of streetlamps and sensors that could ease traffic congestion and reduce carbon emissions.
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Working the Land and the Data | New York Times

Working the Land and the Data | New York Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Technology offers some family-owned farms an opportunity to thrive and compete with giant agribusinesses.

 

Kip Tom, a seventh-generation family farmer, harvests the staples of modern agriculture: seed corn, feed corn, soybeans and data.

 

“I’m hooked on a drug of information and productivity,” he said, sitting in an office filled with computer screens and a whiteboard covered with schematics and plans for his farm’s computer network.

 

Mr. Tom, 59, is as much a chief technology officer as he is a farmer. Where his great-great-grandfather hitched a mule, “we’ve got sensors on the combine, GPS data from satellites, cellular modems on self-driving tractors, apps for irrigation on iPhones,” he said. ...

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Algorithm fatigue: What Evernote’s news-recommending product can tell us about privacy | Nieman Lab

Algorithm fatigue: What Evernote’s news-recommending product can tell us about privacy | Nieman Lab | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Evernote Context integrates the research process seamlessly into the user's workflow — why don't (some) users like it?
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