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Ecuador is betting $1 billion that a dream city can make it a high-tech leader - MiamiHerald

Ecuador is building a research university and city in the middle of a remote pasture. Can it succeed where others have failed?

 

URCUQUI, Ecuador -- It’s the year 2043 and this burgeoning city of 100,000 is a high-tech Mecca. Using rare plants from the Amazon, university researchers have cured many diseases; factories churn out nano-sponges that soak up oil spills around the world; local software designers are the envy of Palo Alto. Ecuador — once known for its crude and bananas — is now the Silicon Valley of the tropics, the Singapore of the Andes. ...


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/07/12/4233299/ecuador-is-betting-1-billion-that.html#storylink=cpy

 

 

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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
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Fear Cannot Dictate Big Data Law | AlleyWatch

Fear Cannot Dictate Big Data Law | AlleyWatch | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The White House recently unveiled the framework of the president’s first big data privacy plan, part of a series that seeks to shield individual liberty.

 

The administration is working with bipartisan sponsors on a bill to protect data collected from students through educational apps, with lawmakers claiming to have worked alongside privacy advocates and more than 100 companies including Microsoft, Google and Amplify to develop a pledge that will curtail the misuse of data gathered in the classroom.

 

At the heart of the matter is the growing realization that we live in an age where everyone has their own unique data trail — whether that’s from our smartphones, store cards or posts on social media. This information has become so valuable that it is now collated and analyzed before being sold to other companies. And the likes of Facebook, Google and Twitter have built billion-dollar valuations on this type of data. ...

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Work on smart cities to begin soon in India, 500 brownfield projects to take off | Financial Express

Work on smart cities to begin soon in India, 500 brownfield projects to take off | Financial Express | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Urban development minister M Venkaiah Naidu said on Tuesday work would begin on several smart cities very soon and by October activity would be in full swing.

 

Moreover, in a couple of months, about 500 cities with a population of over 1 lakh would be upgraded by redeveloping them. Naidu said that for smart cities to be successful, it was important to empower municipal bodies, adding that allowing them to issue municipal bonds was a step in this direction.

 

“The government is keen to ensure that such improvements are done in a manner such that urban habitations become more livable over a sustained period,” he said. ...

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Data transfers may represent ‘serious violation’ of rights

Data transfers may represent ‘serious violation’ of rights | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

European Court of Justice begins hearing arguments in landmark Facebook privacy case.

 

The European Court of Justice has heard that the alleged transfer of European personal data to US intelligence services represents an “indiscriminate general surveillance” that is “manifestly incompatible” with EU privacy rights.

 

The EU’s highest court heard oral arguments today in the case of Austrian privacy campaigner Max Schrems against the Irish Data Protection Commissioner (DPC), in a referral from the High Court in Dublin.

 

Last year Mr Schrems challenged the DPC for not pursuing his complaint, on foot of claims by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, that Facebook had breached EU law by passing his data to the US National Security Agency’s “Prism” programme. The High Court asked Luxembourg for clarification of EU rules regarding EU citizen data transfer to the US, known as the “Safe Harbour” provision. ...

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Smart cities make dumb citizens | Waag Society

Smart cities make dumb citizens | Waag Society | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

By taking away initiative, enforcing top-down control, and focusing on maximizing efficiency instead of possibility, the smart city is a disaster waiting to happen. Our hope lies in its constituents: the citizens. Citizens can become smart, engaged, and illuminated through mastering the technologies that help them express themselves, connect to others, share their resources and thoughts, and that helps them to reflect so they can decide the best course of action. ...

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New organisation - Data Justice | Challenging Rising Exploitation and Economic Inequality from Big Data

New organisation - Data Justice | Challenging Rising Exploitation and Economic Inequality from Big Data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Challenging Rising Exploitation and Economic Inequality from Big Data.

The control of personal data by “big data” companies is not just as issue of privacy but is becoming a critical issue of economic justice - See more at: http://www.datajustice.org/blog/data-justice-report-taking-big-data-economic-justice-issue#sthash.NHt69FbP.dpuf
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Masdar City, Green Desert Paradise Or Disappointing Mirage?

Masdar City, Green Desert Paradise Or Disappointing Mirage? | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
MASDAR CITY — They appear like a mirage in the Gulf desert. A few yellow and silver futuristic buildings, "embroidered" ocher facades, a triangular metal lighthouse, solar panels for as far as the eye can see. Many people come to this modern oasis 30 kilometers from Abu Dhabi like
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The Quantified Workplace: Despite the Hype, Not All That Useful Yet

The Quantified Workplace: Despite the Hype, Not All That Useful Yet | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Big Data promises to predict employee behavior. But as it turns out, humans aren't particularly predictable.

 

Five or six years ago, companies realized that they were sitting on a wealth of data about their own employees. "People started to realize, 'Wait a minute, there’s a lot of data in here that we’re not using. Some of it is wrong. It’s not very clean,'" says Josh Bersin, the founder of Bersin by Deloitte, an HR research and advisory arm of Deloitte. "But if we look at it like we look at customer data, we could probably make much better decisions about who to promote, where they should be in the company, what role they would be successful at.

 

Since then, the people-analytics industry has emerged, with companies using algorithms and Big Data to recruit and assess employees. ...

 

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We Can’t Trust Uber | NY Times

We Can’t Trust Uber | NY Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Less reassuring, though, was the apparent threat from a senior vice president of Uber to spend “a million dollars” looking into the personal lives of journalists who wrote critically about Uber. The problem wasn’t just that a representative of a powerful corporation was contemplating opposition research on reporters; the problem was that Uber already had sensitive data on journalists who used it for rides. ...

 

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Public Works: Crowdsourcing a Map of Urban Decay - Detroit Blight Removal Task Force

Public Works: Crowdsourcing a Map of Urban Decay - Detroit Blight Removal Task Force | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

A Detroit tech startup has created a smartphone app called Blexting, a tool that allows locals to upload photos and descriptions of derelict buildings around the city and track them through an online database. ...

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To establish Dublin as a smart city we must strike a balance - Independent

To establish Dublin as a smart city we must strike a balance - Independent | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

LOW-cost sensors, including those in mobile devices, are creating new possibilities for helping local authorities to manage cities. They help manage flows of goods and people through the city and help us react to unforeseen events in real-time ....

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Beware the rise of the digital oligarchy | Guardian

Beware the rise of the digital oligarchy | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Powerful algorithms and the concentration of data in the hands means we need better models of data-ownership
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The Real Smart City | Core 77

The Real Smart City | Core 77 | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The Smart City is a huge, vague and ubiquitous idea. The phrase—so insistent yet so slippery—suggests a way we can understand how cities work and how we might get them to work better.  But deep down it raises serious questions of what we think cities are and what they could or should be. And the idea that it suggests—of the relationship between the physical and digital attributes of the city—is far too important to outsource to corporate providers.

 

Every age has its own idealized image of the city. From the ancient Athenian polis that invented the notion that we are citizens of a political and social framework, through the 19th-century vision of the city-as-body that gave us the “circulation” of traffic as if it were blood, to the 20th-century conception of the city as fabric of the welfare state, these ideas and metaphors have shaped, first, how we understand the city, and then helped make the city in that image.

 

The Smart City is our own era’s idealized image of the city. It imagines the city as an ecosystem of data, nature and culture. The image it suggests is of information gently collected as we cycle through a park, the soft whirr of a sensory device embedded in the fabric of the city tracking us. Smartness suggests the city itself gaining a kind of intelligence, an intelligence that is responsive and interactive with its citizens. ...

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Alina Akhmerova's curator insight, March 9, 5:40 PM

A smart city or a city of change?

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Fogs, logs and cogs: The newer, bigger shape of big data in the Internet of Things | The Big Data Hub

As we transition to a world where clouds penetrate every facet of our lives, we need to wrap our heads around the thought that every edge node, no matter how resource-constrained, can be interconnected, intelligent and integral to the performance of the whole.

 

What I’m sketching out is the vision of a world in which the Internet of Things (IoT) increasingly drives the evolution of cloud computing architectures. In an IoT-centric world, nobody needs to know that your cloud’s processing, storage and other functions have been virtualized to endpoints of every size, configuration and capability. ....

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Government Big Data Problems Are No Match for These Startups | Inc

Government Big Data Problems Are No Match for These Startups | Inc | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
From monitoring the darkest corners of the web to getting government requests cleared more quickly, startups are growing by tackling data overload.
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The First Auction for Algorithms Is Attracting $1,000 Bids | WIRED

The First Auction for Algorithms Is Attracting $1,000 Bids | WIRED | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

A new auction is treating seven impactful algorithms like artworks.

 

“Code can be judged on its aesthetic merits, not just practical merits,” says Fernando Cwilich Gil, an artist and one half of Ruse Laboratories. Gil, along with his partner Benjamin Gleitzman, are the organizers of the Algorithm Auction, a benefit for The Cooper Hewitt that focuses on highlighting the “aesthetics” of computer code. The Ruse team partnered with Artsy to curate seven of what they believe to be the most impactful and elegant algorithms ever created. The algorithmic lots are currently being auctioned off online at Artsy, much like a painting or historically significant piece of furniture might be at Sotheby’s. ....

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In ‘Data-ism’ Steve Lohr gives his take on how Big Data will shape our future | Washington Post

In “Data-ism” Steve Lohr gives his take on how Big Data will shape our future.
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Smart cities and why they need a lot more social scientists to get involved

Smart cities and why they need a lot more social scientists to get involved | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

As a social scientist, though, various things struck me about the day, particularly about how social differences were – or were not – addressed.  Various thoughts follow.One striking thing about the day was the way in which almost every speaker began with some kind of statistics and visuals about urban population growth. This was the starting point for nearly everyone: cities are growing, the proportion of the world’s population living in cities is increasing rapidly, and this is going to be a massive problem for urban resources and infrastructure.  The other demographic trend repeatedly mentioned – often personified by the speaker’s grandma – was that the world’s population is also ageing rapidly, which was also generally assumed to be an almost equally massive problem in terms of future healthcare provision.  While neither of these facts are wrong, it did strike me that the way in which they framed every presentation, to the exclusion of any other kind of demographic, must surely be shaping the discussion of smart cities in quite specific ways.  What would happen to the debate if speakers started from other kinds of demographic information – the number of adults with caring responsibilities, for example?  Or the number of people sensitive to electro-magnetic fields?  And then we might also reflect on the fact that thinking about the social situations in which smart cities are embedded only in terms of the numbers of people and their resource requirements is also a pretty specific understanding of people, let alone cities. ...

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Bristol is making a smart city for actual humans (Wired UK)

Bristol is making a smart city for actual humans (Wired UK) | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The city of Bristol has announced a multi-million pound experiment to create the smart city of the future
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Smart City Panel Reveals a Major Challenge to Implementation - issue is positioned as opp for vendor not cities

Smart City Panel Reveals a Major Challenge to Implementation - issue is positioned as opp for vendor not cities | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Smart Cities are a great, burgeoning opportunity for all manner of vendors, from broad-smart-city-wide solution providers to small single-person start ups that leverage ever increasing data from city-based sources. It’s an exciting area that some companies are even strategizing around – building a value proposition around cities instead of specific vertical industries or countries. However, this growing opportunity is not without pitfalls and challenges, no doubt more than what can fit in this blog post – however at our Frost & Sullivan Growth, Innovation, and Leadership event in Silicon Valley this month, we posed some of the top vendor concerns to cities that were on our Smart City panel. ...

 

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Manifesto for the Clever City - a rejigged vision of the smart city

Manifesto for the Clever City - a rejigged vision of the smart city | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The technology industry has approached the Smart City with largely the same assumptions that have served well through personal computing, web, mobile and now internet of things. Gathering as many data as possible in case they can work out a way to monazite them.

 

The city, however, is a very different context to the ones where digital technology is already preeminent. Consumers and enterprises have choices about the devices and services they adopt allowing them to opt out of products they do not feel are appropriate. Short of uprooting their entire lives citizens can not opt out of using their cities. Because of this municipal authorities need to exercise great care in the deployment of the internet of things in public space.

 

There is growing unease around the Smart City movement because of this tension. A discourse critical of the movement is gaining momentum in academia. Useful as this attention is we must not throw the baby out with the bath water. Pervasive computing and connectivity present huge opportunities to solve very real problems for citizens. We need to find a way to let this happen on terms those citizens are comfortable with. These principles for how Clever City systems can be created and used aim to aid this  ....

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Smart Cities Of The Future: The Shareable City Of Nijmegen | IntelligentHQ

Smart Cities Of The Future: The Shareable City Of Nijmegen | IntelligentHQ | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Sharing and The Sharing economy have been thriving lately and also changing the way that people go about their lives in recent years. People have been sharing their rooms with strangers, car pooling and even sharing power tools. However, there are few that have opened up to sharing in the way that Nijmegen has. Nijmegen is one of the oldest cities in the Netherlands, at more than 2,000 years old. The city has recently become one of the first sharing cities in the world ...

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Alina Akhmerova's curator insight, March 12, 3:45 PM

Sharing is smart!

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New sensor array changes the data collection game - Array of things | Phys.org

New sensor array changes the data collection game - Array of things | Phys.org | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

As urban populations increase, so too does the complexity involved in maintaining basic services like clean water and emergency services. But one of the biggest barriers to making cities 'smarter'—for example, comprehensively monitoring sources of waterway pollutants in real time—is quick and easy to data ...

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We can use open data to make smart cities “searchable” | CityMetric

We can use open data to make smart cities “searchable” | CityMetric | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

As we all rush to surf upon the sweeping tide of smarter cities, it pays to just pause and think – what exactly is a smart city? Or to put it another way, what is it that makes a city "not so smart" to start with? As urbanisation has been growing, distances have also been increasing between people. Communication systems have found ways to link people who are geographically distant; but they still have to catch up with the problem of how exactly to recreate the relationship between people and the environment.

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2030: How 4 smart cities are gearing up for the future | Mashable

2030: How 4 smart cities are gearing up for the future | Mashable | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Malmo, New York, Masdar and Songdo all show us what our cities will look like in the future.  While the future (as a whole) is very much unwritten, the future of what our urban centers will look like is less uncertain.  Here's a glimpse of what green design, smart technologies and sustainable architecture will look like in four cities by 2030. ...

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Smart Cities: Big Data and Resiliency | WIRED Insights

Smart Cities: Big Data and Resiliency | WIRED Insights | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Smart city discussions are almost always based on technology and how that technology can be used to improve the systems that make urban areas work. Efficiency, however, isn’t the only factor that needs to be considered. Dr. Simone Sala (@hereissimone), the Associate Director of the Sensemaking Fellowship based at the Swansea University Network Science Research Center, reminds us that resiliency, especially in the emerging world, is as important as efficiency. ...

 
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