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Smart Dublin: high-tech sensors to monitor life in the capital | Irish Times

Smart Dublin: high-tech sensors to monitor life in the capital | Irish Times | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Dublin is set to become the first fully sensored global city after chipmaker Intel announced plans to test more than 200 “gateways” around the city.

 

The plan, which will use Intel’s Irish developed Quark system, will place sensor gateways around the city to gather and monitor data on the environment, including air quality and noise. ...

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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
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Why I Am Not a Maker: tech culture celebrates creation, ignoring those who teach, criticize and support | Atlantic

Why I Am Not a Maker: tech culture celebrates creation, ignoring those who teach, criticize and support | Atlantic | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Every once in a while, I am asked what I “make.” A hack day might require it, or a conference might ask me to describe “what I make” so it can go on my name tag.

 

I’m always uncomfortable with it. I’m uncomfortable with any culture that encourages you take on an entire identity, rather than to express a facet of your own identity ("maker," rather than "someone who makes things"). But I have much deeper concerns.

 

An identity built around making things—of being “a maker”—pervades technology culture. There’s a widespread idea that “People who make things are simply different [read: better] than those who don’t.” ....

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André Lemos's curator insight, Today, 5:12 AM

I'm an engineer, bur I'm not a maker! 

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The Humanist's Emerging Role in Big Data | Datanami

The combination of big data and advanced analytics can help us find answers to questions that may otherwise stay unknown. But what questions are we asking of our big data sets, and what data are we using? The answers are important, and point to the need for a humanist’s touch in big data projects.

 

In a recent TED talk and report, Susan Etlinger, a social media analytics expert at the Altimeter Group, elaborated on the need to understand the context surrounding what we do with big data. Beyond just avoiding the types of logical traps that big data can lure us into–such as mistaking correlation for causation—taking a more humanist approach will help big data practitioners not get better answers to our questions, but also maintain better relationships with their constituent communities. ...

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'The Cloud' and Other Dangerous Metaphors - ideas about data and privacy are affected by language choices | Atlantic

'The Cloud' and Other Dangerous Metaphors - ideas about data and privacy are affected by language choices | Atlantic | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Contemporary ideas about data and privacy are tied up inextricably with language choices.

 

Contemporary ideas about data are tied up inextricably with metaphors around data. As a concept, data constantly eludes crisp definition. It is everywhere and nowhere, encompassing a mind-boggling array of people, activities, and concepts. One dictionary, taking up the challenge of definition, unhelpfully offers that data is “facts and statistics collected together for reference or analysis.” But this problem is not unique to data; humans are forced all the time to deal with broad concepts they cannot fully articulate. So people do here what they do in all cases—lean on the crutch of metaphor. Rather than talk about data directly, we analogize to better understand situations that seem to line up with the problem at hand....

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Smart socks, smart pacifier, smart ring: It's the Internet of Things | Chicago Tribune

Smart socks, smart pacifier, smart ring: It's the Internet of Things | Chicago Tribune | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Will 2015 be the year of the connected pacifier, the almighty gesture-control ring or printable, edible cupcake frosting? Probably not, but I now feel less guilt-ridden about last year's endorsement of a slow cooker programmable and controllable by a smartphone app.
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Smart cities are coming–here’s what they will know about us | Quartz

Smart cities are coming–here’s what they will know about us | Quartz | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Smart cities are coming–and they want to make your life more balanced. With community infrastructure becoming replete with sensors, daily decisions will soon be based on data, creating harmony with the people in your community and making sustainability natural.
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Emlyn Davies-Cole's curator insight, January 21, 10:47 PM

This will be a real game changer in how we inhabit our cities.

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The rise of Afro-Smart cities should be viewed with caution | Jonathan Silver on LSE Blog

The rise of Afro-Smart cities should be viewed with caution | Jonathan Silver on LSE Blog | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Smart cities are the latest craze across Africa. But should we be as excited about them as public discourse says we should? LSE’s Jonathan Silver thinks not. 

 

The recent announcement by IBM establishing its twelfth global laboratory in Nairobi has followed a rise in news about Smart cities across urban Africa. These include IBM’s inclusion of Durban and Abuja in its Smarter Cities Challenge, a plethora of summits and conferences, together with planning for a series of new smart urban extensions on the periphery of major conurbations such as Accra and Kinshasa. Together these developments are generating an ever growing clamour concerning the potential of smart urbanism to transform urban Africa through the integration of digital technologies across networked infrastructures, offering resource efficiencies, global competitiveness, safer cities and ultimately much greater control over the built environment and everyday life.....

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Gatwick CIO plans to harness big data and make airport 'the Uber of aviation' | Computing

Gatwick CIO plans to harness big data and make airport 'the Uber of aviation' | Computing | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Gatwick Airport is developing a new service that it claims will be the "Uber of air travel", after analysing big data and determining that it's something that passengers want.

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Who needs cars? Smart mobility can make cities sustainable | Trust.org

Who needs cars? Smart mobility can make cities sustainable | Trust.org | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

With cities poised to invest now in infrastructure that will last for decades, huge opportunities lie ahead.

 

Last year marked an important tipping point: for the first time, half of the global population lives in cities. Cities currently add 1.4 million people each week and this population growth comes with new buildings, roads and transport systems.

 

In fact, 75 percent of the infrastructure that will be in place by 2050 does not exist today. With cities poised to invest now in infrastructure that will last for decades, huge opportunities lie ahead. But without major shifts now in how we manage established as well as rapidly growing cities, we risk losing out on the potential of urbanisation to create more inclusive and prosperous societies.

 

2015 offers a big chance for the international community to help put cities on a more sustainable path. We at the World Bank and the World Resources Institute (WRI) believe that we must seize this opportunity, because cities and urban mobility are key to a sustainable future. ...

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Is Privacy Becoming a Luxury Good? by Julia Angwin keynote | Strata + Hadoop 2014 (video)

Is Privacy Becoming a Luxury Good? by  Julia Angwin keynote | Strata + Hadoop 2014 (video) | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

From the 2014 Strata Conference + Hadoop World in New York City. We are being watched – by companies, by the government, by our neighbors. Technology has made powerful surveillance tools available to everyone. And now some of us are investing in counter-surveillance techniques and tactics. Julia Angwin discusses how much she has spent trying to protect her privacy, and raises the question of whether we want to live in a society where only the rich can buy their way out of ubiquitous surveillance. ...

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Sticker shock: The Internet of Things has turned $10 light bulbs into $99 light bulbs | VentureBeat

Sticker shock: The Internet of Things has turned $10 light bulbs into $99 light bulbs | VentureBeat | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Just about every Internet of Things idea seems cool -- until you see the price.
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'Smart Cities' Should Mean 'Sharing Cities' | Time

'Smart Cities' Should Mean 'Sharing Cities' | Time | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

When mayors and developers focus on technology rather than people, smart quickly becomes stupid. These days every city claims to be a “smart” city, or is becoming one, with heavy investments in modern information and computing technology to attract businesses and make the city competitive.

But when mayors and developers focus on technology rather than people, smart quickly becomes stupid, threatening to exacerbate inequality and undermine the social cooperation essential to successful cities. After researching leading cities around the world, we’ve concluded that truly smart cities will be those that deploy modern technology in building a new urban commons to support communal sharing.

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Smart Cities won’t work in India, say planners - The Times of India

Smart Cities won’t work in India, say planners - The Times of India | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Indian cities have very little planning. What little planning exists, is impractical as the vision of development is far fetched compared to ground realities. There is a need to remove this mismatch between actual development (urban planning) and the big ‘visions’ and concepts like ‘Smart Cities’ that are generally borrowed from the western word.
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5 ways to build more smart cities - Agenda - The World Economic Forum

5 ways to build more smart cities - Agenda - The World Economic Forum | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

For the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population lives in cities. Over 90 percent of urban growth is occurring in the developing world, adding an estimated 70 million new residents to urban areas each year. Demand for services in urban areas is therefore increasing exponentially, and the capacity of local governments to manage this demand is challenged.

 

Moreover, even though private sector has been successful in leveraging technology to improve service delivery and efficiency, governments have failed to fully embrace the benefits that these innovations bring. There is a growing need for governments to be able to deliver more services in a more efficient and effective way with limited resources. Cities need to innovate and create new tools and approaches. ...

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A smart road that can produce energy | Sustainable Mobility

A smart road that can produce energy | Sustainable Mobility | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The fifth-generation road, R5G, will be tested in the Seine-et-Marne area.

 

In November 2014, the Ile-de-France département’s general council signed an agreement with the French Institute of Sciences and Technology for Transport, Development and Networks (Ifsttar), making a stretch of the D199 road available to them for testing the new generation of French roads, known as R5G.


Road networks receive considerable amounts of energy in the form of wind, solar radiation or friction. R5G is therefore designed to produce the energy necessary for its operation, signage, maintenance and even potential surplus, which could be sold on to third parties. ...

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The Internet of Abused Things - Dark Reading

The Internet of Abused Things - Dark Reading | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

We need to find ways to better secure the Internet of Things, or be prepared to face the consequences.

 

IP-enabled devices have become much more than just a fashion or trend; they’re now a necessity that’s being consumed by millions worldwide. According to Gartner, more than 4.9 billion connected devices are forecasted to be in use by 2015, irreversibly disrupting society – for better or worse – as we know it.

 

Consumer technology has never seen such a whirlwind of low-cost and mass-sale Internet-connected devices, raising the question of whether companies are only interested in driving sales and not necessarily in the security implications. You probably know the answer by now, as you may have already heard about firmware vulnerabilities in IP cameras or hacked baby monitors. Will this be the future? ...

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Chicago builds ETL toolkit for open data -- GCN

Chicago builds ETL toolkit for open data -- GCN | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Data officials in Chicago built an automated extract transform load (ETL) framework to more quickly and easily open city data.

 

About a year ago, the city government embedded Pentaho Data Integration (PDI), a graphical extract-transform-load (ETL) tool with pre-built and custom components to process big data, into its OpenData ETL Utility Kit. The kit provides several utilities and a framework to help governments extract data from a database and upload it to an open data portal using automated ETL processes. ...

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The machines are talking - Ericsson

The machines are talking - Ericsson | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Machines talking: Today, we can study the feedback coming from the machines that talk to us, so we can plan for a better society tomorrow.  

 

Are you listening?

 

There is a constant silent sound from all the machines out there. They are speaking to us, but are we listening to them? I believe that there are a lot of interesting facts and insights that we can gain if we just start to listen to the bits and bytes that are continuously passing by us. There is ample opportunity to better understand society from the data it generates. ...

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Platform Economics Will Rule the Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review

Platform Economics Will Rule the Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

As everyday objects get connected, brace yourself for network effects, says one economist.

 

Product companies compete by building ever bigger factories to turn out ever cheaper widgets. But a very different sort of economics comes into play when those widgets start to communicate. It’s called the network effect—when each new user of a product makes its value higher. Think of the telephone a century ago. The greater the number of people who used Bell’s invention, the more valuable it became to all of them. The telephone became a platform for countless new businesses its inventor never imagined. ...

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Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking and real-time dashboards | Regional Studies, Regional Science

Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking and real-time dashboards | Regional Studies, Regional Science | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

(2015). Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking and real-time dashboards. Regional Studies, Regional Science: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 6-28. doi: 10.1080/21681376.2014.983149

 

Since the mid-1990s a plethora of indicator projects have been developed and adopted by cities seeking to measure and monitor various aspects of urban systems. These have been accompanied by city benchmarking endeavours that seek to compare intra- and inter-urban performance. More recently, the data underpinning such projects have started to become more open to citizens, more real-time in nature generated through sensors and locative/social media, and displayed via interactive visualisations and dashboards that can be accessed via the internet. In this paper, we examine such initiatives arguing that they advance a narrowly conceived but powerful realist epistemology – the city as visualised facts – that is reshaping how managers and citizens come to know and govern cities. We set out how and to what ends indicator, benchmarking and dashboard initiatives are being employed by cities. We argue that whilst these initiatives often seek to make urban processes and performance more transparent and to improve decision making, they are also underpinned by a naive instrumental rationality, are open to manipulation by vested interests, and suffer from often unacknowledged methodological and technical issues. Drawing on our own experience of working on indicator and dashboard projects, we argue for a conceptual re-imaging of such projects as data assemblages – complex, politically-infused, socio-technical systems that, rather than reflecting cities, actively frame and produce them.

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Welcome to the Open Data Movement’s Turbulent Teenage Years – Next City

Welcome to the Open Data Movement’s Turbulent Teenage Years – Next City | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The open data movement is at a turning point. ...

 

“Everybody’s in favor of open data when it’s easy, when it’s quick,” says Headd, 45. “If you’re really open, then why are you not giving me information that will let me evaluate the quality of the job you’re doing? It’s a new way of interacting with people you serve. … And I think that reality was not apparent to most people when Philly started on this.”

 

He recalls meeting with people from the city’s Department of Finance to explain in careful detail how to release sensitive expenditure data and noticing midway through the meeting that no one was taking notes.

 

“I realized they don’t expect me to be here anymore. Or they don’t expect me to have the ability to tell them what to do anymore,” says Headd, “And I said it’s time to go, even though it was the highlight of my professional career.”

 

After one year and seven months, in April 2014, Headd stepped down as Philadelphia’s chief data officer. ...

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First crowdsourced, open data address list launches in the UK | GeekTime

First crowdsourced, open data address list launches in the UK | GeekTime | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Startup launches open data platform for UK addresses to create biggest open address data set.

 

Have you ever typed in an address into Google Maps and couldn’t find the place you were looking for, tried to send mail to a specific place and it always came back, or tried and failed to access address data for your startup? If you answered yes to any of these perils, you understand how challenging it is for a country to keep its address records updated and open.

 

The London based startup and open data advocacy organization Open Addresses UK wants to change all of that by inviting the public to collect and validate housing addresses to build the biggest UK open address dataset ever. To do so, they launched UK’s first open and free address list on Wednesday, calling on individuals and companies to crowdsource information. They presented the initiative at the #GeoMob event in London. ....

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The Internet of Things has four big data problems - O'Reilly Radar

The Internet of Things has four big data problems - O'Reilly Radar | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things (IoT) has a data problem. Well, four data problems. Walking the halls of CES in Las Vegas last week, it’s abundantly clear that the IoT is hot. Everyone is claiming to be the world’s smartest something. But that sprawl of devices, lacking context, with fragmented user groups, is a huge challenge for the burgeoning industry.

 

What the IoT needs is data. Big data and the IoT are two sides of the same coin. The IoT collects data from myriad sensors; that data is classified, organized, and used to make automated decisions; and the IoT, in turn, acts on it. It’s precisely this ever-accelerating feedback loop that makes the coin as a whole so compelling.

 

Nowhere are the IoT’s data problems more obvious than with that darling of the connected tomorrow known as the wearable. Yet, few people seem to want to discuss these problems ...

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How Google's geo-crowdsourcing is transforming the map | City Metric

How Google's geo-crowdsourcing is transforming the map | City Metric | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Google has managed to map most of the world. Recently, the company offered a behind-the-scenes glimpse into how it built the Google Maps application using a combination of technology (the Google Street View car); expansion (the acquisition of satellite-imagery startup Skybox); and algorithms (computer vision, photogrammetry, mapping).
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Data Analysis and Farming Efficiency | Sustainable Cities Collective

In 2009, Stellari cofounded AgSquared, a software company focused on small-farm planning, management, and record keeping.  Stellari and her AgSquared cofounder Jeff Froikin-Gordon met at Cornell graduate school at a time when agriculture and big data were converging. The first plant genomes were being sequenced and these scientific advances encouraged graduate students like Stellari and Froikin-Gordon to start thinking about big data questions. ...

 

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How smart are ‘smart’ cities? - Geographical

How smart are ‘smart’ cities? - Geographical | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Our metropolises are becoming highly networked and technologically advanced urban hubs. How should we react to the rise of the smart city?
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