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Smart city standards and innovation: arch enemies or BFFs? - GreenBiz.com

Smart city standards and innovation: arch enemies or BFFs? - GreenBiz.com | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The nascent concept of a smart city is the subject of modern imagination and promise.  From its emergence as a broad idea to its ultimate drive toward standardization, the potential of the smart city is compelling, as is the potential of standards to expedite its movement forward.

 

But when we speak of standards, what exactly do we mean? And should we worry that standards might dull the highly creative and sometimes idiosyncratic space of a smart city?

 

Standards sounds a bit like the arch enemy of innovation. Yet experience suggests that innovation and standardization are less arch enemies and more BFFs — best friends forever. Together they can aggressively move forward the smart city vision and give infrastructure and service providers the market share and freedom to truly move the smart city needle. ....

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The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
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US intelligence chief: we might use the internet of things to spy on you | Guardian

US intelligence chief: we might use the internet of things to spy on you | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
James Clapper did not name specific agency as being involved in surveillance via smart-home devices but said in congressional testimony it is a distinct possibility
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Abusing the Internet of Things: Blackouts, Freakouts, and Stakeouts

Abusing the Internet of Things: Blackouts, Freakouts, and Stakeouts | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Nitesh Dhanjani’s 2015 O’Reilly book Abusing the Internet of Things: Blackouts, Freakouts, and Stakeouts is a very practical existence-proof of the inadequacy and urgency of Internet of Things security.

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The NSA's Chief Hacker Says Connecting Heating Systems to the Internet is a Risk to National Security | MIT Technology Review

The NSA's Chief Hacker Says Connecting Heating Systems to the Internet is a Risk to National Security | MIT Technology Review | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The leader of the National Security Agency’s hackers says that putting industrial control systems online has made America less secure.
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The problem with smart cities | LiveMint

The problem with smart cities | LiveMint | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Urban administrations and the private sector must join hands for the Special Purpose Vehicle model to work.  By 15 December, 85 cities out of the total 98 included under the Smart Cities Mission had submitted their respective Smart City Plans to the ministry of urban development. Hopefully, the remaining cities will follow suit shortly. The stage is ready for this ambitious mission that aims to make Indian cities sustainable and competitive.  The journey so far has a few lessons and concerns that need attention. Apart from criticism on the quality of proposals and public participation, there were indications of a few cities hesitant to submit their proposals. ....

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'We don't need IT here': the inside story of India’s smart city gold rush | The Guardian

'We don't need IT here': the inside story of India’s smart city gold rush | The Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The first winners of India’s Smart City Challenge will be announced next week, as part of prime minister Narendra Modi’s ambitious plans to transform urban life. Rahul Bhatia goes behind the scenes in the final, chaotic stages of one bid

Via Ayona Datta
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Singapore is building a fully smart city in 2016 (Wired UK)

Singapore is building a fully smart city in 2016 (Wired UK) | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Urban upgrades will be coming to metropolises old and new.

 

The 670km2 state of Singapore is the poster child for a city in upgrade mode. 

 

"We are not supposed to be here," Vivian Balakrishnan -- who was minister for environment and water resources until October 2015, as well as the head of the Smart Nation Initiative -- told the audience at an innovation event that WIRED attended in April 2015. "What you see in Singapore is an exercise of desperate imagination. It's not about innovation because it's sexy, but because it's survival."

 

His plan: to turn Singapore into the international guinea pig for smart technologies.....

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Smart cities: How sensors, data and analytics can transform millions of urban lives | Alphr

Smart cities: How sensors, data and analytics can transform millions of urban lives | Alphr | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Learning the lessons of past smart city experiments, with Nesta’s Tom Saunders.

 

When you think of smart technology, it’s tempting just to consider your phone, TV, fridge or maybe your lamps, but that’s just small fry. The Internet of Things has the power to change lives on a far greater scale than the simple convenience of changing mood lighting via your mobile.

 

How, as so often when it comes to Internet of Things applications, is a little bit harder to pinpoint, but the potential is most definitely there and visible in small-scale examples around the globe. One man who knows more about this than most is Nesta UK’s Tom Saunders, who has done a lot of research into the future of smart cities, including co-authoring a study on how smart cities should be approached, to ensure the limitless possibility isn’t squandered on data for the sake of data.....

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Farmers pool in 9,000 acres to develop smart city near Mumbai | Indian Express

Farmers pool in 9,000 acres to develop smart city near Mumbai | Indian Express | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Residents of 11 villages join hands to create modern township in Khalapur taluka of Raigad district; land titles to remain in the names of owners.

 

Farmers in the outskirts of Mumbai have pooled in 9,000 acres of land to build a smart city.

 

Thousands of farmer families in 11 villages in Raigad’s Khalapur taluka have pitched in with their ancestral farmland. The pooled land will be converted into a non-agriculture zone, after which a special purpose vehicle (SPV) will be promoted to build a smart city with the right mix of commercial, residential and environmental features.

 

The model envisages farmers owning shares in the SPV in proportion to the value of their land. Besides getting plush homes, they will earn dividends on shares they hold and income from contractual work for the SPV and the commercial units that are expected to invest in the township. ....

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The $50 Million Competition to Remake the American City | Wired

The $50 Million Competition to Remake the American City | Wired | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The DOT's Smart City Challenge invites American cities to take advantage of new technologies that could change how we move, with a $50 million prize.

 

In the next 30 years, the American population will rise by 70 million people. This being the future, those people will love ordering stuff online even more than people do now, which will prompt a 45 percent rise in freight volume. The nation’s roads, already crumbling because Congress likes bickering more than legislating, will be home to 65 percent more trucks.....

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Encryption and the Internet of Things: Mission Impossible?

Encryption and the Internet of Things: Mission Impossible? | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Researchers have again defeated the Algebraic Eraser, used to encrypt devices on the Internet of Things. Is security impossible on the IoT?

 

There’s no doubt that the Internet of Things (IoT) is on an upswing. As noted by IT Business, firms like IDC are calling for at least 22 billion connected devices by 2018, with more than 200,000 apps and services being developed for the IoT specifically. But big business and effective security don’t always go hand in hand: According to SC Magazine, a team of researchers has just defeated one of the most widely used IoT encryption solutions, the Algebraic Eraser. What’s more, they’ve done it using parameters provided by the creators of the key itself. Does this make effective security “mission impossible” in a truly connected world?...

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How vulnerable are smart cities to cyberattack? | The Programmable City

How vulnerable are smart cities to cyberattack? | The Programmable City | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Smart city solutions utilise complex, networked assemblages of digital technologies and ICT infrastructure to manage various city systems and services.  Any device that relies on software to function is vulnerable to being hacked.  If a device is networked, then the number of potential attack points multiples across the network, and the hack can be performed remotely (1). Once a single device is compromised, then the whole assemblage becomes vulnerable to cyberattacks that seek to ‘alter, disrupt, deceive, degrade or destroy computer systems and networks or the information and/or programs resident in or transiting these systems or networks’ (2). ...

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No longer lost in the crowd? How people’s location and movement is being tracked | The Programmable City

No longer lost in the crowd? How people’s location and movement is being tracked | The Programmable City | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Up until relatively recently tracking the location and movement of individuals was a slow, labour-intensive, partial and difficult process.  The only way to spatially track an individual was to follow them in person and to quiz those with whom they interacted.  As a result, people’s movement was undocumented unless there was a specific reason to focus on them through the deployment of costly resources.  Even if a person was tracked, the records tended to be partial, bulky, difficult to cross-tabulate, aggregate and analyze, and expensive to store.

 

A range of new technologies has transformed geo-location tracking to a situation where the monitoring of location is pervasive, continuous, automatic and relatively cheap, it is straightforward to process and store data, and easy to build up travel profiles and histories.  This is especially the case in cities, where these technologies are mostly deployed, though some operate pretty much everywhere.  Here are eleven (updated from 7 in original post) examples. ...

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The ‘mind-boggling’ risks your city faces from cyber attackers | MarketWatch

The ‘mind-boggling’ risks your city faces from cyber attackers | MarketWatch | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Cities, counties and states across the U.S. are grappling with the question of how to secure sprawling networks against cybercriminals.

 

San Diego, for example, uses more than 400 different applications, some which are decades old and may not be up-to-date. The city is hit by an average of 60,000 cyberattacks a day, Gary Hayslip, the city’s chief information officer, said.

 

“You’re kind of wondering, how the hell did we get here?” said Hayslip. “The inherent risk in this could, at times, be mind-boggling.” ...

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Cybercrime is booming and the Internet of Things will just make things worse

Cybercrime is booming and the Internet of Things will just make things worse | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Hackers are getting better and businesses are increasingly at risk, according to a new report from global security consultants PwC. Worryingly for corporate digital security chiefs, this problem is expected to get worse as the Internet of Things gains in popularity. Here's how bad corporate cybercrime is right now: The number of detected security incidents climbed 38% in 2015 compared to a year earlier, according to PwC, and has been growing at a steady double-digit clip over the last five years. The total number of incidents captured in the survey now stands at 59 million, although the true figure is likely to be much higher. ...

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New report: Getting smarter about smart cities: Improving data privacy and data security | The Programmable City

New report: Getting smarter about smart cities: Improving data privacy and data security | The Programmable City | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

As part of ‘EU Data Protection Day’ a new report – “Getting smarter about smart cities: Improving data privacy and data security” – was launched today by Dara Murphy T.D., Minister for European Affairs and Data Protection.  The report, commissioned by the Data Protection Unit, Department of the Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister) and written by Rob Kitchin (of The Programmable City project), is the first publication by the new Government Data Forum, a panel of experts drawn from across industry, civil society, academia and the public sector. The Forum advises Government on the opportunities and challenges for society and the economy arising from continued growth in the generation and use of personal data.  The report is available from the Department of the Taoiseach website or click here. ...

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Americans want privacy at home, but are more open to surveillance at work | The Verge

Americans want privacy at home, but are more open to surveillance at work | The Verge | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Americans are often willing to give up some personal data in exchange for a free service or perceived benefit. It’s the type of data, and where it’s being shared, that’s typically the determining factor, a new Pew Research Center study found. American adults were most likely to be okay with their privacy being infringed on where they work, and were more open to sharing health data than other kinds of information.  Pew gave 461 participants six scenarios and asked if the privacy tradeoff was worth the returned reward....

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Big data ethics: Why the CIO needs to get involved | TechTarget

Big data ethics: Why the CIO needs to get involved | TechTarget | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Big data ethics is becoming a serious topic of conversation among Ivy League types and big data practitioners, as illustrated by recent big data conversations at Harvard University and Strata + Hadoop World.
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Do We Need Big Data to Create Smart Cities? Fair Observer

Do We Need Big Data to Create Smart Cities? Fair Observer | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Data collection and analysis have played an important role in smart cities, but should citizens’ privacy be used as a foundation?

Via Ayona Datta
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Privacy is an afterthought when convenience is king | Fusion

Privacy is an afterthought when convenience is king | Fusion | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
The Internet of things has made life so convenient you can unlock your front door from your phone. But the privacy and security concerns are substantial.
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The alchemy of big data in government | The Hill

The alchemy of big data in government | The Hill | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Data analytics is an exciting new frontier providing insights into the future conduct of our world.

 

Data are everywhere, flowing from the sensor networks that surround us and at the root of our transactional activities. What, why and how we make choices in our lives are reflected in, and can be discerned through, the collection, organization and taxonomy of data.

 

The U.S. government maintains one of largest repository of documents in the world. Millions of supporting documents are compiled and stored every year by a multitude of government agencies, which have a responsibility to preserve, secure and retrieve vital information when needed. While paper documents are still very much routine for government operations, the goal has been to increasingly move from paper to electronic images. ...

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The promise and perils of predictive policing based on big data | The Conversation

The promise and perils of predictive policing based on big data | The Conversation | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Preventing crime before it happens, while saving resources, sounds like a great use of big data. But these calculated probabilities raise big questions about civil liberties.

 

Police departments, like everyone else, would like to be more effective while spending less. Given the tremendous attention to big data in recent years, and the value it has provided in fields ranging from astronomy to medicine, it should be no surprise that police departments are using data analysis to inform deployment of scarce resources. Enter the era of what is called “predictive policing.”

 

Some form of predictive policing is likely now in force in a city near you. Memphis was an early adopter. Cities from Minneapolis to Miami have embraced predictive policing. Time magazine named predictive policing (with particular reference to the city of Santa Cruz) one of the 50 best inventions of 2011. New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton recently said that predictive policing is “the wave of the future.” ...

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85 cities submit smart city proposals to Urban Development Ministry, India - InfotechLead

85 cities submit smart city proposals to Urban Development Ministry, India - InfotechLead | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
India government today said 85 of 98 cities have submitted smart city proposals to the Urban Development Ministry. Tamil Nadu seeks time to submit 12 proposals later due to floods, while Telangana seeks to replace Hyderabad. There are 30 foreign companies associated with smart city plans of 45 mission cities. 85 of the 98 cities
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This Dumb Smart Fridge Shows Why the Internet of Things Will Break

This Dumb Smart Fridge Shows Why the Internet of Things Will Break | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The latest in the Internet of Broken Things: A Samsung smart fridge has had a broken Google Calendar app for over a year. Not so smart after all.

 

For over a year, owners of a Samsung smart fridge have been unable to use their fridge’s pre-installed Google Calendar app, proving what we all suspected: the Internet of Things can quickly become an Internet of Broken Things.

 

A digital calendar on your fridge seems useful—that way, the whole family knows when Susie’s oboe lesson is cancelled or the Joneses are coming over for dinner. But anything that’s Internet connected has to get regular updates, or it will break. Apparently, the Samsung fridge depends on an old version of the Google API, and Samsung hasn’t yet pushed out necessary updates to all fridges. They acknowledged the issue in November last year and began to send updates to some fridges in February, but many people are still waiting for a fix. (Silver lining? While the calendar app is broken, it can’t leak your Google login information to hackers.)...

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The urban, infrastructural geography of ‘the cloud’ | everyday structures

The urban, infrastructural geography of ‘the cloud’ | everyday structures | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The relationship between data to space extends beyond the network equipment, services, and mobile devices that transmit and present information to a user. Pervasive wireless connectivity and ubiquitous computing, as ‘the cloud’ are central, common elements of contemporary urban life. Data centers translate, as it were, between individuals and their experience of the city by mediating experiences through digital augmentation. An example of this is Google Maps’ locative ability to place the user on the map and then orient said user to wherever they need to go. While data is largely immaterial except in the action it enables, like getting you to your meeting with that map, the storage, maintenance, and transmission of data require many layers of interfacing telecommunication infrastructure that function nearly everywhere but are always, inherently embedded in particular places. ....

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