The Programmable ...
Follow
Find
22.0K views | +16 today
 
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
onto The Programmable City
Scoop.it!

The New Science of Cities by Mike Batty | The MIT Press

The New Science of Cities by Mike Batty | The MIT Press | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

In The New Science of Cities, Michael Batty suggests that to understand cities we must view them not simply as places in space but as systems of networks and flows. To understand space, he argues, we must understand flows, and to understand flows, we must understand networks—the relations between objects that comprise the system of the city. Drawing on the complexity sciences, social physics, urban economics, transportation theory, regional science, and urban geography, and building on his own previous work, Batty introduces theories and methods that reveal the deep structure of how cities function.

 

Batty presents the foundations of a new science of cities, defining flows and their networks and introducing tools that can be applied to understanding different aspects of city structure. He examines the size of cities, their internal order, the transport routes that define them, and the locations that fix these networks. He introduces methods of simulation that range from simple stochastic models to bottom-up evolutionary models to aggregate land-use transportation models. Then, using largely the same tools, he presents design and decision-making models that predict interactions and flows in future cities. These networks emphasize a notion with relevance for future research and planning: that design of cities is collective action.

more...
No comment yet.
The Programmable City
How is the city translated into software and data, and how does software reshape the city?
Curated by Rob Kitchin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

How the web lost its way – and its founding principles | Guardian

How the web lost its way – and its founding principles | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
When Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web 24 years ago he thought he'd created an egalitarian tool that shared information for the greater good. But it hasn't quite worked out like that. What went wrong, asks Stuart Jeffries
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Smarter parking codes to promote smart growth | Smart Growth America

Smarter parking codes to promote smart growth | Smart Growth America | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Unless you’re walking to your destination in a busy downtown neighborhood, chances are good that you need parking at the end of the trip. Nowadays, several cities are changing their thinking on parking regulations in response to the growing demand for car-light living.

Typically, parking rules are used to establish the minimum number of off-street private car parking spaces that must be provided in new residential and commercial developments. This helps manage traffic and congestion as new projects and more people come to the area, and it helps keep parking demand from overtaking supply over time. However, the following cities are modernizing their approach and tackling the parking issue in new ways. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Ranking the states on open data -- FCW

Ranking the states on open data -- FCW | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Increasingly, states are following feds into the open data space, with varying degrees of success. So far, 10 states have established open data policies, with nine of these offering portals to host government data sets. Some states focus data disclosures around contracts, spending, and legislation. Typically, these aren't quite as robust as open data policies because the information isn't presented in machine readable format, or because it focuses on narrow topic areas. A few cities, including Philadelphia, Burlington, Vt., and South Bend, Ind., have open data policies that could serve as templates for adoption at the state level. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Building Smart Cities in India | Switchboard, from Natural Resources Defense Council

Building Smart Cities in India | Switchboard, from Natural Resources Defense Council | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

In his Independence Day speech from Old Delhi’s famed Red Fort, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced plans to replace India’s 64-year-old Planning Commission with a new central government think-tank led by mix of experts. The new eight-member institute would focus on creative thinking, broader development and take several critical functions previously performed by the Planning Commission.  One such function that will carry through to the new institute is central government leadership in convening state and central government leaders and experts on advancing clean energy development – including key objectives to increase energy access and energy security through a robust energy efficient buildings market.  ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Persistent traces, potential memories: Smartphones and the negotiation of visual, locative, and textual data in personal life

This article examines how the capacities of smartphones to reshape memory practices are enacted and negotiated in personal life. It is argued that digital devices and networked media facilitate a vast production and circulation of persistent digital traces that are potential memories. An approach that privileges sociotechnical practices is used to empirically examine the roles of digital devices, software, and social media in reconfiguring personal memory. In-depth interviews with 30 individuals aged between 20 and 30 are used to examine the details of reflexive and routine modes of forgetting and remembering related to the prevalence of devices and the digital traces produced in quotidian use. The increasingly visual life of data of many kinds promotes a ‘continuously networked present’ (Hoskins, 2012), but this is highly differentiated and actively negotiated in complex ways that both reproduce and reconfigure established memory practices.

more...
Ken Fury's curator insight, August 22, 3:01 AM

not entirely relevant but very enlightening 

 

Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Infrastructure report: The fibre route to smart cities | NZ Herald News

Infrastructure report: The fibre route to smart cities | NZ Herald News | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Chorus network strategy manager Kurt Rodgers says a by-product of New Zealand's fibre network roll-out is an opportunity to create smart cities and towns. - New Zealand Herald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

What smart cities can learn from the Luddites

What smart cities can learn from the Luddites | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The ‘smart city’ epithet is particularly attractive right now. After all, you have to be stupid to be against anything that’s smart. And the smart money is on smart cities: India has just announced it wants 100 of them. Big technology meets big property: what could go wrong?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Cities 500K plus pop. 1800-present: an interactive data visual

This interactive data visual – now updated to cover all cities with 500,000-plus inhabitants – illustrates the scale and speed of urban transformation that research by IIED has sought to document and describe
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Africa makes inroads on open development data

Africa makes inroads on open development data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

New statistical and open data platforms are being set up to remedy long-standing challenges of development data access across Africa, promising to improve services and increase transparency.
 
Open data on developing countries can be used “to improve the efficiency and coverage of public services in a variety of development sectors such as education, health, transport, energy”, says Amparo Ballivian, a lead economist at the World Bank.

Open data can also help generate new businesses and therefore job opportunities, and improve transparency, adds Ballivian.

In February, the African Development Bank (AfDB) launched the Africa Information Highway (AIH), which comprises two types of portals for each participating country: a statistical data portal and an open data portal.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Pioneering Smart Cities: What Separates Innovators From The Rest? | The Toolbox

Pioneering Smart Cities: What Separates Innovators From The Rest? | The Toolbox | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Since Code for America's inaugural year in 2011, 28 municipal governments have participated in the (CfA) Fellowship Program. Last year, officials from 80+ cities attended the annual CfA summit in San Francisco, when the Code for America civic innovation community gathers in person for three days of collaborating, connecting and learning. 

 

One of the main things that these municipal governments have in common is their willingness to innovate. Many have Chief Innovation Officers, who are charged with translating ideas of government innovation including open data initiatives, which are developed to identify better ways to use technology and spark the kind of citizen engagement that leads to action.  

 

For all of the cities that have embraced the Code for America ideal of open data and transparency there are numerous governments that haven’t. But why? ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Theses on the Epistemology of the Digital | Alan Liu

Theses on the Epistemology of the Digital | Alan Liu | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The following was written as a solicited follow-up to my participation in the second planning consultation session of the Cambridge University Centre for Digital Knowledge. The session, held on 7 May 2014 at the Cambridge Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), focused on “digital epistemology,” one of the two intended thematic strands of the Centre for Digital Knowledge. A previous planning consultation at CRASSH that I did not attend focused on the other intended strand of “digital society.”

My theses below are meant more as provocation than as prescription; and they do not take account of plans that may have been put in place for the Center for Digital Knowledge since the planning consultations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Big Data and the Beautiful Game | Technology Services Group

Big Data and the Beautiful Game | Technology Services Group | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
“Data is worthless, only decisions have value” – this was the overriding sentiment at this year's 2014 Sports Analytics Innovation Summit.As a self-confessed data junkie, Qlikview addict, armchair football analyst and long suffering Blackburn Rovers fan, it was probably only a matter time before these four cornerstones of my life (at least the ones I’m prepared to share here) all converged at once into a 'Big Bang'; the result being my first blog.
more...
AnalyticsInnovations's curator insight, August 16, 9:27 AM

Sports Analytics...


Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Big Data and the Future of the Social Sciences | Audible Impact Episode 3

Big Data and the Future of the Social Sciences | Audible Impact Episode 3 | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

  In this podcast, Professor Patrick Dunleavy talks about how big data will affect the future of the social sciences. Say goodbye to academic siloes as we enter into a new age of cross/multi/and inter-disciplinary research. In this changing landscape, the old boundaries between physical, social and data science disintegrate. Here Professor Dunleavy talks about the Social Science of Human-Dominated and Human-Influenced Systems given as part of the Annual Lecture series at the Academy of Social Sciences.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Crafting “smart cities”: India’s new urban vision | openIndia

Crafting “smart cities”: India’s new urban vision | openIndia | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

With a new government in Delhi, India’s urban agenda is now focused on the creation of “Smart Cities” in industrial corridors.  Such an initiative is driven by the demand of foreign investors to find sanitized spaces in developing countries in which they can operate easily – unhampered by politics. ...

more...
André Lemos's curator insight, August 25, 6:42 AM

The very idea of Smart Cities seems to be based on the assumption that there are technocratic solutions for the routine problems that citizen face. Technology is heralded as the “apolitical” means by which governance can be fixed and saved from the operation of “politics”. Problems of inefficiency that are seen to dominate the old bureaucratic-political order are hence given a “smart” solution by employing “Big Data”. However such a vision does not take into consideration the fallibility of technology or the fact that the technology-centric governance that Smart Cities promote can further exclude the people at the margins of power.

What is driving the Smart City agenda is the need for foreign capital to enter into new territories in the developing world by avoiding some of the regulatory hurdles it otherwise faces. To ease the entry of large foreign investments into such projects, the government provides for a single-window clearance system. Also, many of the proposed Smart Cities are either designated as Special Economic Zones (SEZs) or will house SEZs in them.  SEZs are geographical enclaves which have many exemptions from the regular tax laws, customs and excise duties and labour laws.

Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Tailored experience or digital stalking? Has personalisation gone too far? | Guardian

Tailored experience or digital stalking? Has personalisation gone too far? | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Brands risk alienating consumers with overly invasive social campaigns, but there are ways to make them work for both sides, says Natasha Clark.

 

In a time poor, media-saturated society used to instant gratification, many customers like the idea of brands tailoring content to their individual needs. But, as marketers know, there is a trade-off for personalised brand experiences: people trade data for a tailored brand experience.

 

That’s why whenever their smartphone software or favourite social media app updates to a new version, they are likely to automatically click “yes” to its permissions – allowing the brand to track their location, data, emails, and even publish things on their behalf – without really reading the terms and conditions. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Smart Cities need big parks to thrive | Bloomberg

Smart Cities need big parks to thrive | Bloomberg | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

Dense, smart cities need big parks to thrive.

 

I grew up in Manhattan, and I’m quite fond of dense living. I like having neighbors on either side of me, a few inches away. It doesn’t feel oppressive or crowded; it feels cozy.

 

But if you want people to commit to lifelong density, they need some open space to escape to -- somewhere they can walk to. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

It’s the Neoliberalism, Stupid: Why instrumentalist arguments for Open Access, Open Data, and Open Science are not enough.

It’s the Neoliberalism, Stupid: Why instrumentalist arguments for Open Access, Open Data, and Open Science are not enough. | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

The Open Movement has made impressive strides in the past year, but do these strides stand for reform or are they just symptomatic of the further expansion and entrenchment of neoliberalism? ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Africa Makes Inroads On Open Development Data | allAfrica

Africa Makes Inroads On Open Development Data | allAfrica | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
New statistical and open data platforms are being set up to remedy long-standing challenges of development data access across Africa, promising to improve services and increase transparency.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

India pins hopes on smart cities | BBC

India pins hopes on smart cities | BBC | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

India's new government has ambitious plans for urban regeneration.

In its first budget, unveiled last month, it announced plans to spend $1.13bn (£690m) on building 100 "smart cities".

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's administration is taking its cue from developments elsewhere in Asia, including China and Singapore. But will the scheme work?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Google buys neural network city guide creator Jetpac | Guardian

Google buys neural network city guide creator Jetpac | Guardian | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence-based method of creating guides to cities using public photos appealed to Google’s drive for building smart systems. By Charles Arthur
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Nowcasting economic and social data: when and why search engine data fails, an illustration using Google Flu Trends

Obtaining an accurate picture of the current state of the economy is particularly important to central banks and finance ministries, and of epidemics to health ministries. There is increasing interest in the use of search engine data to provide such 'nowcasts' of social and economic indicators. However, people may search for a phrase because they independently want the information, or they may search simply because many others are searching for it. We consider the effect of the motivation for searching on the accuracy of forecasts made using search engine data of contemporaneous social and economic indicators. We illustrate the implications for forecasting accuracy using four episodes in which Google Flu Trends data gave accurate predictions of actual flu cases, and four in which the search data over-predicted considerably. Using a standard statistical methodology, the Bass diffusion model, we show that the independent search for information motive was much stronger in the cases of accurate prediction than in the inaccurate ones. Social influence, the fact that people may search for a phrase simply because many others are, was much stronger in the inaccurate compared to the accurate cases. Search engine data may therefore be an unreliable predictor of contemporaneous indicators when social influence on the decision to search is strong.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

‘Data, Algorithms, & Tradecraft’: Keeping A Little Humanity In Big Data | Breaking Defense

‘Data, Algorithms, & Tradecraft’: Keeping A Little Humanity In Big Data | Breaking Defense | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

ARLINGTON: “Big data” is big business nowadays. Defense contractor Lockheed Martin, for example, boasts their analytical tools have successfully predicted everything from Arab Spring uprisings to the onset of sepsis in hospital patients. But big data can also go wrong in big ways. If you set a powerful program loose on a large enough data set, it can come up with spectacularly specious correlations that have nothing to do with cause and effect. More people tend to drown in swimming pools, for example, in years when Nicholas Cage appears in multiple movies. That example is easily caught by common sense, but far more dangerous are the correlations that look plausible to policymakers while still being wrong. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

What are smart cities? An Indian view | The Hindu

What are smart cities? An Indian view | The Hindu | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

With everyone talking of the 100 smart cities announced in this year’s budget, Anuj Puri takes a closer look.

 

Across the world, the stride of migration from rural to urban areas is increasing. By 2050, about 70 per cent of the population will be living in cities, and India is no exception. It will need about 500 new cities to accommodate the influx.

 

Interestingly, urbanisation in India has for the longest time been viewed as a by-product of failed regional planning. Though it is inevitable, and will only change when the benefits of urbanisation overtake the costs involved, it is an opportunity for achieving faster growth.

 

With increasing urbanisation and the load on rural land, the government has now realised the need for cities that can cope with the challenges of urban living and also be magnets for investment. The announcement of ‘100 smart cities’ falls in line with this vision. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

Go to Chicago for visit to future of big data

Go to Chicago for visit to future of big data | The Programmable City | Scoop.it
No doubt you’ve heard about “big data,” a buzz term that gets associated with dramatic visions for the future, both utopian and dystopian.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Kitchin
Scoop.it!

“Smart Mobility” for Developing Cities | World Bank, Transport for Development

“Smart Mobility” for Developing Cities  | World Bank, Transport for Development | The Programmable City | Scoop.it

In many developing cities, transport infrastructure – whether it be roads, metro systems or BRT - is not growing fast enough, and cannot keep up with the ever-increasing demand for urban mobility. Indeed, constructing urban transport infrastructure is both expensive and challenging. First, many cities do not yet have the capacity to mobilize the large amount of funds needed to finance infrastructure projects. Second, planning and implementing urban transport infrastructure projects is tough, especially in dense urban areas where land acquisition and resettlement issues can be extremely complex. As a result, delays in project implementation are the norm in many places. Therefore, solving urgent urban transport problems in these cities requires us to think outside the box. Fortunately, the rapid development of ICT-enabled approaches provides a great opportunity to optimize and enhance the efficiency of existing and new urban transport systems, at a cost much lower than building new infrastructure from the ground up. ....

more...
No comment yet.