Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper
283 views | +0 today
Follow
Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper
Breast cancer prevention and healing news, information and inspiration for THRIVERS of strength & spirit. The Pink Paper is your online source of HOPE. Be empowered. Say "Yes" to Health, Happiness and Hope.
Curated by Natalie Palmer
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

The importance of biopsy in clinically diagnosed metastatic lesions in patients with breast cancer

The importance of biopsy in clinically diagnosed metastatic lesions in patients with breast cancer | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"Receptor status discordance, such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status between primary breast cancer and metastatic lesions has been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biopsy of clinically diagnosed metastatic lesions and to determine the changes in hormonal receptor and HER2 status of the metastatic lesions.

Methods: Sixty-three patients with clinically diagnosed metastatic breast cancer underwent an excisional biopsy or core needle aspiration guided by computed tomography/ultrasound.

ER, PR and HER2 were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC).

Results: A total of 48 metastases (76.2%) and nine second primary malignancies (14.3%, seven primary lung cancers and two primary pancreatic cancers) were found. The discrepancies between ER, PR and HER2 status between the primary breast cancer and metastatic lesions were 14.6%, 16.7% and 8.3%, respectively.

Six lesions (9.5%) were proved benign upon biopsy."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Cancer Survivorship
Scoop.it!

OpenNotes Helps Keep Patients Informed and Engaged - US News

OpenNotes Helps Keep Patients Informed and Engaged  - US News | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it
Trials found patients
are happier and have better medical outcomes when theycan see
everything in their own medical records

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Cancer Survivorship
Scoop.it!

Mobile Apps for Chronic Cancer Patients

Mobile Apps for Chronic Cancer Patients | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it
Which apps can be used by chronic cancer patients to help them with their illness and overall health?

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
Deborah Fenlon's curator insight, March 1, 2014 5:24 AM

journal article pointing out a number of apps available 

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Cancer Survivorship
Scoop.it!

Survivorship Is Not a Passive Sport | Cancer Network

Survivorship Is Not a Passive Sport | Cancer Network | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

Patients often have astonishing drive and determination while on active treatment. But the new focus on survivorship is tricky.


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
Julie Marker's curator insight, March 6, 2014 5:26 AM

'Over to you'.  What to do, how to do it, who is there to advise and monitor?

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Trial to assess the utility of genetic sequencing to improve patient outcomes - National Cancer Institute

Trial to assess the utility of genetic sequencing to improve patient outcomes - National Cancer Institute | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"A pilot trial to assess whether assigning treatment based on specific gene mutations can provide benefit to patients with metastatic solid tumors is being launched this month by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.  The Molecular Profiling based Assignment of Cancer Therapeutics, or M-PACT, trial is one of the first to use a randomized trial design to assess if assigning treatment based on genetic screening can improve the rate and duration of response in patients with advanced solid tumors. A trial in which patients are randomly assigned to various treatment options is the gold-standard method for determining which treatment option is best. 

Researchers hope that in addition to the knowledge gained from the trial about assigning therapy based on results of genetic sequencing of tumors, this trial could identify patient sub-groups that are likely to benefit from certain treatments and result in new treatments being developed quickly for some cancers.  This could ultimately lead to smaller, more definitive clinical trials, which would be helpful to clinicians and patients in terms of cost and time.

“Patients will have their tumors genetically screened and if a pre-defined mutation is found, they will receive treatment with targeted agents,” said Shivaani Kummar, M.D., head of NCI’s Developmental Therapeutics Clinic and the principal investigator of the trial.  “What we don’t know, however, is whether using this approach to assign targeted treatments is really effective at providing clinical benefit to patients, as most tumors have multiple mutations and it’s not always clear which mutation to target and which agent is most likely to provide maximal benefit. This study hopes to address some of these questions in the context of a prospective, randomized trial.”


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Comparative Proteome Analysis Revealing an 11-Protein Signature for Aggressive Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Comparative Proteome Analysis Revealing an 11-Protein Signature for Aggressive Triple-Negative Breast Cancer | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

Abstract


Background Clinical outcome of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly variable. This study aims to identify and validate a prognostic protein signature for TNBC patients to reduce unnecessary adjuvant systemic therapy.

Methods Frozen primary tumors were collected from 126 lymph node–negative and adjuvant therapy–naive TNBC patients. These samples were used for global proteome profiling in two series: an in-house training (n = 63) and a multicenter test (n = 63) set. Patients who remained free of distant metastasis for a minimum of 5 years after surgery were defined as having good prognosis. Cox regression analysis was performed to develop a prognostic signature, which was independently validated. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results An 11-protein signature was developed in the training set (median follow-up for good-prognosis patients = 117 months) and subsequently validated in the test set (median follow-up for good-prognosis patients = 108 months) showing 89.5% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 69.2% to 98.1%), 70.5% specificity (95% CI = 61.7% to 74.2%), 56.7% positive predictive value (95% CI = 43.8% to 62.1%), and 93.9% negative predictive value (95% CI = 82.3% to 98.9%) for poor-prognosis patients. The predicted poor-prognosis patients had higher risk to develop distant metastasis than the predicted good-prognosis patients in univariate (hazard ratio [HR] = 13.15; 95% CI = 3.03 to 57.07; P = .001) and multivariable (HR = 12.45; 95% CI = 2.67 to 58.11; P = .001) analysis. Furthermore, the predicted poor-prognosis group had statistically significantly more breast cancer–specific mortality. Using our signature as guidance, more than 60% of patients would have been exempted from unnecessary adjuvant chemotherapy compared with conventional prognostic guidelines.                      


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, February 1, 2014 3:16 PM

Conclusions from the study:


Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most aggressive breast cancer subtypes. To date, there is no clinically available targeted therapy for patients diagnosed with TNBC. Current guidelines for breast cancer treatment recommend that the majority of lymph node–negative (LNN) breast cancer patients, including TNBC patients, be treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.

Eventually approximately 30% of LNN TNBC patients develop distant metastasis and could thus potentially benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy; this indicates that the majority of patients are currently being overtreated. The lack of highly sensitive and specific prognostic markers is a major obstacle to predicting prognosis of TNBC patients. Moreover, there is an urgent need to identify potentially useful targets for therapy. Some commonly applied approaches for biomarker discovery, such as gene expression profiling, have not yet succeeded in identifying highly sensitive and specific markers related to disease progression of TNBC. Although a few publications have claimed to identify gene signatures that predict prognosis of TNBC, the reported signatures have limited clinical value because of their experimental design and lack of sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, it is desirable to identify a highly sensitive and specific prognostic signature for clinical application.

 In this study, we identified and independently validated a protein signature to predict 5-year metastasis-free survival of LNN patients who did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy, which would allow for the selection of TNBC patients that can be spared the toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy.                

Maria Fowler's curator insight, February 7, 2014 7:15 PM

Metaplastic Breast Cancer paitents could greatly benefit from a better way to determine which tumors are chemo-resistant and which are primed for Metastasis .

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Profiles in Oncology Social Media: SWOG Cancer Research

Profiles in Oncology Social Media: SWOG Cancer Research | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"@SWOG Twitter Bio: “SWOG designs and conducts clinical trials to improve the practice of medicine in preventing, detecting, and treating cancer. Leading cancer research. Together.”

SWOG, one of the cancer research cooperative groups supported by the National Cancer Institute, is turning to social media to advance its work. The current SWOG grant includes a goal to use social media to enhance awareness of the group—specifically to improve clinical trial enrollment.

SWOG's social media working group is co-chaired by Michael Fisch, MD, MPH (@fischmd), Professor and Chair of the Department of General Oncology and principal investigator of the Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and his MD Anderson colleague, Mark Lewis, MD (@marklewismd), Assistant Professor in General & GI Oncology.

For this article, Fisch and SWOG Chair Charles D. Blanke, MD (@SWOGChair) discussed their social media plans for the group.

 Back to Top | Article Outline

Why did you decide to commit to social media by including a specific aim in your NCI grant?

Charles Blanke, MD: “One of our goals is to reach out to adolescents and young adults with cancer to increase their ability to participate in clinical trials, and it came to my attention that one potential way to reach this audience was through the use of social media. I knew Dr. Fisch had expertise so I turned to him for advice, and he had huge ideas—well beyond patient recruitment—to include providing information to our patients, providing information to other physicians and the public, and helping make our staff aware of high-priority trials.


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, January 28, 2014 7:30 PM

According to the article these are examples of social media being used to advance clinical research:


Michael Fisch, MD (@fischmd): “The ECOG-ACRIN Myeloma Committee with Mike Thompson, MD (@mtmdphd) and Vincent Rajkumar, MD (@VincentRK) started a Sunday evening tweetchat and they regularly discuss open and enrolling trials. ECOG-ACRIN is using the hashtag #EAOnc and this harmonizes with #SWOGOnc to promote good cross-talk among the cooperative groups.

“SWOG's myeloma committee participation is led through Bob Orlowski, and he uses bitly bundles (http://bitly.com/bundles/o_e4k6dsvn8/4) to publicize SWOG's myeloma trials.”

Blanke: “Julie Gralow MD (@jrgralow) used social media to get patient input early in the design of a clinical trial, and that experience shows how this works so well. She asked the #bcsm community (www.bcsmcommunity.org) for advice on designing a trial to determine how to optimally screen for breast cancer recurrence, so Deanna Attai (@DrAttai) posted a survey on the BCSM website and tweeted about it using the #bcsm hashtag.

“That generated hundreds of patient responses, and prompted #bcsm participant Liza Bernstein (@itsthebunk) to write a blog post titled “Collaborative Medicine in Action” (itsthebunk.blogspot.com/2013/04/collaborative-medicine-in-action.html).

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Breast Cancer: Don't Delay Chemo

Breast Cancer: Don't Delay Chemo | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"Delaying adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer more than 60 days significantly increased the odds of premature death and distant metastasis, a review of almost 7,000 cases showed.

As compared with starting adjuvant therapy within 30 days of surgery, initiating chemotherapy at 61 days or later was associated with a 19% increase in the risk of premature death. In the subgroup of patients with stage III disease, the mortality risk increased by 76%. Relapse-free survival (RFS) and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) worsened regardless of stage at diagnosis, according to Mariana Chavez-MacGregor, MD, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues.

Patients with high-risk breast cancer (triple negative, HER2-positive, or stage III) seemed most susceptible to the adverse effects of delayed chemotherapy, as reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, January 28, 2014 5:15 PM

To see the abstract go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2014/01/21/JCO.2013.49.7693.abstract


Maria Fowler's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:58 PM

Metaplastic Breast Cancer grows so quickly... it is my personal beliefe that you shouldn't wait for any treatment both chemo and surgery.

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

New drug in development to reverse spread of breast cancer

New drug in development to reverse spread of breast cancer | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"A new drug is being developed that could potentially stop the spread of breast cancer in its tracks.

Researchers at Cardiff University in Cardiff, Wales, are working on a novel compound that targets a well-studied protein called Bcl3, which has been shown to play a crucial role in breast cancer’s spread throughout the body – a deadly process known as metastasis.

“People thought Bcl3 would be involved perhaps with the growth of tumors,” lead author Dr. Richard Clarkson, from Cardiff University’s European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, told FoxNews.com. “What we found was that wasn’t true.  It didn’t affect the primary tumor’s growth, but it seemed to have an important role in the subsequent spread of that tumor to other parts of the body.”

A substantial majority of cancer deaths are caused by metastasis, since cancer is much easier to treat when it’s localized in the body.  Nearly 12,000 breast cancer patients will develop metastasis each year – sometimes even several years after initial discovery of a breast lump.

Through a recent series of studies in Clarkson’s lab, researchers confirmed that Bcl3 plays a critical role in the development of metastatic breast cancer.  They revealed that by suppressing the Bcl3 gene in mice, the spread of cancer was suppressed by more than 80 percent."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, January 27, 2014 1:16 PM

This is a very early study that is going to be in clinical studies with financial backing from Tiziana Pharmaceuticals. "The researchers are hoping to soon test this drug in human clinical trials with the next two years. However, they stress there is still a long way to go before it can be used in routine cancer treatment."

For more information go to: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/research/cancerstemcell/


Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 27, 2014 2:19 PM
New drug in development to reverse spread of breast cancer
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Exposed to plastic fumes, women working in some factories have a 400% increased risk of breast cancer, study says

Exposed to plastic fumes, women working in some factories have a 400% increased risk of breast cancer, study says | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"Plastics are an increasingly popular component in car construction, used to make vehicles lighter and more fuel efficient. But making these parts can be a messy business which might be making some workers sick.

A study published last year showed that younger women who worked in this industry were much more likely than the general population to get breast cancer.

“If we looked at women under the age of 50, pre-menopausal women,” says Jim Brophy, a retired Executive Director of the Occupational Health Clinic for Ontario Workers (OHCOW) and lead author of the study, “these women’s risk …took off like a rocket. They were over 400 per cent increased risk.”

To make plastic parts, such as bumpers and dashboards, pellets are heated in huge injection molding machines. These machines sometimes eject sticky plastic that smokes and smoulders and that workers can breathe in.

“Oh yeah, it would smoke. It would smell. Some people would complain of nosebleeds, headaches, so we’d open a door,” says Sandy Knight, who worked in an automotive plastics plant in the 1980s and 90s. Sandy was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2000. She believes it may have been related to her work in the plastics industry.

Many of these chemicals have been shown to be endocrine disruptors and carcinogens in animals."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, January 23, 2014 2:07 PM

Exposure to plastics and making plastic parts in Ontario showed that young women were more likely to get breast cancer. According to Leon Genesove, the Ontario Ministry of Labour’s top doctor, “I understand the concerns of Ontario women and their families regarding the issue of breast cancer. The Ministry is working hard to reduce exposure, and to invest in further research." 

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

How Long Have I Got Left?

How Long Have I Got Left? | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"AS soon as the CT scan was done, I began reviewing the images. The diagnosis was immediate: Masses matting the lungs and deforming the spine. Cancer. In my neurosurgical training, I had reviewed hundreds of scans for fellow doctors to see if surgery offered any hope. I’d scribble in the chart “Widely metastatic disease — no role for surgery,” and move on. But this scan was different: It was my own.

I have sat with countless patients and families to discuss grim prognoses: It’s one of the most important jobs physicians have. It’s easier when the patient is 94, in the last stages of dementia and has a severe brain bleed. For young people like me — I am 36 — given a diagnosis of cancer, there aren’t many words. My standard pieces include “it’s a marathon, not a sprint, so get your daily rest” and “illness can drive a family apart or bring it together — be aware of each other’s needs and find extra support.”

I learned a few basic rules. Be honest about the prognosis but always leave some room for hope. Be vague but accurate: “days to a few weeks,” “weeks to a few months,” “months to a few years,” “a few years to a decade or more.” We never cite detailed statistics, and usually advise against Googling survival numbers, assuming the average patient doesn’t possess a nuanced understanding of statistics. 


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Tambre Leighn's curator insight, January 26, 2014 12:35 PM

Beautifully articulated post and mantra to help anyone through challenging times - a quote the author identifies with..."I can't go on. I can go on."  Initial diagnosis is typically followed by waves of medical questions followed by treatment decisions. My late husband and I navigated through that first flurry of sucking up as much information as possible to make the "right" choices.

 

Later, when the quiet settled in and treatment was underway, in the dark, sleepless hours was when the existential aspect of staring cancer down in his 30's often crept in.  The questions much deeper and the answers less tangible...for both of us -  he as the one going through it and me as caregiver.  While facing the questions about life often brought up fears, what ifs it also helped us prioritize what mattered...which was to continue to design and create extraordinary moments in our lives, however long or short our time together was, no matter what.

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, January 26, 2014 12:40 PM

7th Level Wellbeing is, ultimately, about designing and achieving the highest level of quaity of life in all areas and playing your biggest game ever.  When life blindsides us with a challenge, it's common to think we simply cannot. 

 

This inspiring cancer survivor's blog written by a physician steps past the medical impact of the disease and into those choice point moments when facing fears or a challenge that looks like a mountain that can never be summited ~ "I can't go on. I can go on." ~ the quote he found to keep stepping into the next moment and the new day.  What quote or mantra helps you stay inspired when facing major challenges that moves you back to living your highest potential?

Beth A. Williams's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:13 AM

Fascinating perspective from a physician who becomes the patient. The idea of how much time is left is an understandable question, yet  so difficult to predict because of the myriad of factors involved. And isn't the main thing to fully LIVE the life we have TODAY?  Whether it's an accurate prognosis or we beat the odds,  right now is all we are guaranteed, ill or healthy.

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

9 Surprising Foods With More Sugar Than a Krispy Kreme Doughnut

9 Surprising Foods With More Sugar Than a Krispy Kreme Doughnut | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it
A new report finds that some supposedly healthy foods are actually laden with sugar.

Via The BioSync Team
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Do Your Favorite Snack Brands Contain GMOs? - Food Babe

Do Your Favorite Snack Brands Contain GMOs? - Food Babe | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it
Earlier this week on my Facebook page, I posted a disastrous list of America’s most popular snack brands – all of them containing Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs).

Via The BioSync Team
more...
The BioSync Team's curator insight, January 21, 2014 4:19 PM

From the article:  sometimes you just need to get your snack on and this is how you do it without consuming genetically modified ingredients and supporting companies that use GMOs who are trying to stop the effort to label GMOs and our right to know.

Melanie Burch's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:01 PM

Are your favorite snacks on the left list or the right one?

Justin kettner's curator insight, March 10, 2014 12:16 PM

It is nice to know what foods have GMOs in them but at the same point look how long people have ate these products and no one has said anything and no one would know unless presented with this information  so is food a big deal upon the topic GMOS ?

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

New drug, molecular insight into triple negative breast cancers

New drug, molecular insight into triple negative breast cancers | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"Most breast cancers are treated by blocking their addictions, for example depriving estrogen-fueled tumors of estrogen. But what about breast cancers without these hormonal addictions? In so-called "triple negative" tumors the cancer's addiction remains a mystery, making this subtype difficult to treat. However, a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014 showcased a new drug active against triple-negative breast cancer, and through analysis of the drug's mechanism of action, offers increased understanding of the biology of this very aggressive form of breast cancer.

"We developed the compound AMPI-109 in collaboration with Dr. Rahul Ray, a synthetic organic chemist at the Boston University School of Medicine, and showed its effectiveness in preliminary studies of renal and prostate cancers. But it seemed initially as if the drug was inactive against breast cancer," says James R. Lambert, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and assistant research professor at the CU School of Medicine.

However, the initial test of AMPI-109 had been performed against only one form of breast cancer and this disease is notoriously heterogeneous. Despite initial negative results, the group decided to investigate the drug's efficacy against a panel of all known breast cancer subtypes. Strikingly, Lambert and colleagues found the drug was especially effective in specifically one subtype: triple-negative breast cancer, in which the drug blocked the growth of cells by greater than 50 percent.

"This was exciting," Lambert says, "not only did we have a drug that potentially targeted triple-negative breast cancer, but we had a biochemical tool that could be used to dissect the molecular underpinnings of the disease. "

To begin to investigate the molecular mechanism of AMPI-109 action in triple negative breast cancer, the group performed a genome-wide functional genetic screen, individually turning off every gene in the cell while exposing the cells to the drug. Identification of the silenced genes in cells that survived drug treatment would show which genes are essential for the drug's cell-killing effect.


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Maria Fowler's curator insight, April 17, 2014 11:03 AM

Very early study which also does not indicate if any of the TNBC was Metaplastic

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Cancer Survivorship
Scoop.it!

Quality of life and health related quality of life – is there a difference?

Quality of life and health related quality of life – is there a difference? | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

What does evidence tell us about the difference between quality of life (QoL) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) and is it easy to differentiate between these two concepts? This is a question I have been exploring recently as I prepare to carry out a research study which will investigate how quality of life changes in patients managed without dialysis once they make the decision not to embark on dialysis. Some patients will die during the course of the study due to advanced age, frailty and associated co morbidity other than renal disease and there is likelt to be changes in QoL.  At three-monthly intervals patients will complete tools with the aim of measuring changes in their QoL longitudinally.


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, January 31, 2014 10:29 PM

QoL and HRQoL are different but both aim to capture subjective perception and assessment of a patient’s health and well-being. These perception and assessments cannot be identified through laboratory tests, x-ray or other objective testing. Patients’ must carry out this assessment themselves and tools to collect this data must be selected carefully.

 

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Cancer Survivorship
Scoop.it!

Cancer patients should not feel pressure to bounce back to normal immediately

Cancer patients should not feel pressure to bounce back to normal immediately | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it
Those who have been through treatment need time and understanding from family, friends and healthcare professionals, says Justin Stebbing

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Doctors May Need to Revise How They Evaluate Breast Biopsy Results

Doctors May Need to Revise How They Evaluate Breast Biopsy Results | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two types of breast tissue abnormality may have the same potential of progressing to breast cancer, contrary to current belief, according to a new study.

One abnormal tissue finding is known as "atypical ductal hyperplasia" (ADH), an accumulation of abnormal cells in a breast duct. The other abnormal finding is "atypical lobular hyperplasia" (ALH), an accumulation of abnormal cells in a lobule, a small part of a breast lobe that makes milk.

Previously, many experts believed that ADH leads to low-grade ductal breast cancer in the same breast where the biopsy was done, and so it requires complete surgical excision. Meanwhile, many believed that ALH was simply an indicator of increased risk of breast cancer later in both breasts, so it did not require complete surgical removal but perhaps just closer monitoring.

The new research challenges that thinking, suggesting that the two types of abnormalities actually behave in similar ways.

"We were not so sure what to do with ALH before," said study researcher Dr. Lynn Hartmann, a professor of oncology at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. "This is suggesting, treat it the same as ADH. What we are saying is, it doesn't matter which kind [of abnormality]."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Engineered virus is effective against triple negative breast cancer cells

Engineered virus is effective against triple negative breast cancer cells | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"Scientists have discovered a potential cure for one of the most aggressive and least treatable forms of breast cancer called "triple negative breast cancer." In laboratory experiments involving human cancer cells, scientists used a virus similar to the one that helped eradicate smallpox to coax cancer cells to produce a protein which makes them susceptible to radioactive iodine. This discovery was published in the February 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal. Please note that human clinical trials are necessary before any definitive claims of a cure can be made and treatments can be made available.

"We hope that the recent advances in virology, genetic engineering and targeted radiotherapy will soon translate into an entire class of novel oncolytic, virotherapies for the treatment of deadly cancers," said Yuman Fong, M.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, NY.

To make this discovery, Fong and colleagues successfully infected and killed TNBC cells using a vaccinia virus. In addition, the researchers were also able to use the virus to cause infected cancer cells produce a cell surface protein called hNIS that normally is used to concentrate iodine in thyroid cells. The hNIS protein, expressed in thyroid cancer, is why most thyroid cancers can be cured or successfully treated with a small dose of radioactive iodine (which kills thyroid cancer cells expressing hNIS). Armed with the ability to force TNBC cells to produce this protein, researchers now have a way to deliver anticancer therapies to this deadly and resistant form of cancer."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, January 30, 2014 3:31 PM

Even though this is not in human trials yet, it is a great discovery. Dr. Yuman Fong and his associates at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center sucessfully infected and killed TNBC cells using a vaccine. According to Gerald Weissmann, M.D., "This is an important and significant discovery that basically combines proven cures for two other diseases. Even more exciting is that the effects of this virus and radioactive iodine are well known in people, hopefully reducing the amount of time it will take for it to reach the clinic."

To see the abstract go to: http://www.fasebj.org/content/28/2/676.abstract


Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Addition of Neoadjuvant Carboplatin in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Supported by SABCS Studies

Addition of Neoadjuvant Carboplatin in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Supported by SABCS Studies | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"The achievement of a pathologic complete response in patients with triple-negative breast cancer was boosted by the addition of carboplatin to a standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen, and by the addition of veliparib, an investigational oral PARP inhibitor, plus carboplatin to a standard chemotherapy regimen, in studies presented at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

William Sikov, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, reported the results from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 40603 study,1 concluding, “Based on these results, and those of the GeparSixto trial,2 if you decide that a patient with triple-negative breast cancer should receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, it would be reasonable to add carboplatin. You will increase the likelihood of response in the breast and axillary nodes, and can do so with acceptable additional toxicities, primarily an increase in neutropenia and thrombocytopenia.”

Bevacizumab (Avastin) was also evaluated in the study, and also increased pathologic responses when added to chemotherapy, but, considering its toxicity, was felt to be a less promising approach."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:06 PM

This article looks at the SABBS and ASCO studies related to adding carboplatin and/or veleparib (a PARP inhibitor) for triple negative breast cancer. The addition of bevacizimab (Avastin) was less promising when weighed against it's toxicities. At the bottom of the article you can find the abstracts from the studies.

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Yoga Provides Health Benefits for Breast Cancer Survivors - Medical News - Pri-Med Online

Yoga Provides Health Benefits for Breast Cancer Survivors - Medical News - Pri-Med Online | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"TUESDAY, Jan. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors, a 12-week yoga intervention improves fatigue and vitality and is associated with reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser, Ph.D., from The Ohio State University in Columbus, and colleagues examined the impact of yoga on inflammation, mood, and fatigue in a randomized three-month controlled trial involving 200 breast cancer survivors. Participants were randomized to 12-week, twice-weekly, 90-minute hatha yoga classes or wait-list control."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Why Oncologists Lag on Palliative Care

Why Oncologists Lag on Palliative Care | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"It has been more than two years since the American Society of Clinical Oncology published its provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on early palliative care, which says that “combined standard oncology care and palliative care should be considered early in the course of illness for any patient with metastatic cancer and/or high symptom burden” (which I wrote about in OT’s 3/25/12 issue).

 

But oncologists are not all on board. As shown in an Early Release article in the Journal of Oncology Practice, research conducted at three cancer centers that have well-established outpatient palliative care clinics found that 22 of the 74 medical oncologists interviewed believe that palliative care is an alternative to chemotherapy, rather than complementary care.

 

The interviews were conducted in 2012; the ASCO Board of Directors approved the PCO in November 2011 and published it in February 2012. (Click here to hear Thomas J. Smith, MD, Director of Palliative Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, discuss ASCO’s decision to issue the PCO.)

 

 


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Protein linked to spread of breast cancer to brain

Protein linked to spread of breast cancer to brain | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"A protein has been identified that may be a major culprit when breast cancer metastasizes to the brain.

Brain metastasis is a terrifying complication of advanced breast cancer, with a grim prognosis and few treatment options. The cancer's spread to the brain is often undetected until patients start to develop symptoms such as seizures, headaches, and trouble thinking. Scientists hope a better understanding of the molecular events that regulate brain metastasis will lead to earlier diagnosis and improved therapies.

Using cell models, the researchers found that breast cancer cells harness a protein called alpha-B-crystallin to help them stick to endothelial cells that line the small blood vessels in the brain. In addition, this protein enhances the penetration of breast cancer cells through the blood-brain barrier, which normally prevents cells and many molecules from entering the brain. Once in the brain, the breast cancer cells are able to form metastases.

The study, published in Clinical Cancer Research (2013; doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1255), was led by Vincent Cryns, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and a member of the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center in Madison.

 


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Model of Tumor Heterogeneity Can Help Predict How Disease Responds to Treatment

Model of Tumor Heterogeneity Can Help Predict How Disease Responds to Treatment | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

"NEW YORK (GenomeWeb Daily News) – Based on their characterization of heterogeneity in breast cancer tumors, a team of researchers developed a stochastic computational model to predict how tumors develop and evolve.

As the group led by Kornelia Polyak, a principal investigator at Dana-­Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, detailed in Cell Reports this week, they examined the genetic heterogeneity within tumors as well as how that diversity changes in response to chemotherapy treatment.

"By analyzing tumors before and during treatment, we can build models that predict how the tumor will evolve," Polyak said in a statement. "Better understanding of tumor evolution is key to improving the design of cancer therapies and for truly individualized cancer treatment."

Tumors are not uniform throughout as they contain pockets of cells harboring different traits, including differences in response to treatment and in metastatic ability.


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
more...
Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Health, Happiness, and the New Walking Movement

Health, Happiness, and the New Walking Movement | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it

Researchers have discovered a “wonder drug” for many of today’s most common medical problems. It’s been proven to help treat or prevent diabetes, depression, breast and colon cancer, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, obesity, anxiety and osteoporosis ...



Via Pamir Kiciman, The BioSync Team
more...
The BioSync Team's curator insight, December 6, 2013 12:44 PM

From the Article:  Three factors that make walking the most effective treatment:

1) Low or no cost; 2) Simple to do for people of all ages, incomes and fitness levels; 3) Walking is Americans’ favorite physical activity, so you are more likely to stick with a walking program than with other fitness prescriptions.


Read more ...

Rescooped by Natalie Palmer from Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

5 Tips for How to Reduce Inflammation - KrisCarr.com

5 Tips for How to Reduce Inflammation - KrisCarr.com | Breast Cancer and Healing ~ The Pink Paper | Scoop.it
Want to start connecting the dots in your own life? First, let’s learn about acute and chronic inflammation, since they play very different roles in our everyday health.

 


Via PAT NOVAK, The BioSync Team
more...
PAT NOVAK's curator insight, January 18, 2014 3:26 PM

A must read. It is very important to understand the role

inflammation  plays in your health or lack there of. 

 

Be be sure to sign-up for this great blog !

 

http://www.kriscarr.com

 

The BioSync Team's curator insight, January 18, 2014 10:02 PM

Inflamation can silently affect every cell in our body! Over time, a chronic /acute inflamation cycle negatively impacts every aspect of health and wellness.


Read more ...