The pedagogy of inquiry
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The pedagogy of inquiry
What is the essence of inquiry?
Curated by Sue Ward
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Rescooped by Sue Ward from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | #ProfessionalDevelopment #ModernEDU

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | #ProfessionalDevelopment #ModernEDU | The pedagogy of inquiry | Scoop.it
An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
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Leah Brosnan's curator insight, May 27, 9:46 PM

I have one student in particular who is struggling with growth mindset. Participates well until he makes a mistake, then removes himself completely. At the start of our next lesson we will be going through a visual representation like this to help with self awareness.

Tea Vella's curator insight, May 31, 7:26 PM
A really insightful article about Carol Dweck's Fixed vs Growth mindset theory. 
Alana Ford's comment, June 3, 4:58 AM
Found this article very insightful.
Rescooped by Sue Ward from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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How to Ignite Passion in Your Students: Passion-based Learning

How to Ignite Passion in Your Students: Passion-based Learning | The pedagogy of inquiry | Scoop.it

A study in 1985 “On the Brain of a Scientist: Albert Einstein” found that Einstein’s brain was actually not significantly different from others. As an Organization Development blogger put it:

 

                     ===> what made Einstein different was his mind. <===


His thinking and passion for learning were the basis of his genius. His brain was the same, but his intellect was markedly different. He was often humble about his intellect, and instead said that learning relied on working hard and imagining the impossible. So what made his learning so different? What can we learn from Einstein?

 

Read more, very interesting, a MUST:

http://newsroom.opencolleges.edu.au/features/how-to-ignite-passion-in-your-students-8-ways-educators-can-foster-passion-based-learning/

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES, Les Howard, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, November 14, 2012 2:44 PM
That is a beautiful quotation Ian; thank you for sharing!
Ian Giles's comment, November 14, 2012 3:10 PM
Hi Ana, Thank you. I must say I also prefer the original to the reworked version by WB Yeats at the head of this piece!
Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, November 15, 2012 12:30 AM
Thank you ian Giles, totally agrees with you!
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Six Ways the Teacher's Role is Changing | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU

Six Ways the Teacher's Role is Changing | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU | The pedagogy of inquiry | Scoop.it
During this time of significant educational change, we are forced to ask ourselves, what is the role of the teacher?

Teachers continue to be central to learning, but the role is changing significantly. Our children still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, but they also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves. This means students must learn how to self-direct their learning.

So if students are self-directing their learning, what's the role of the teacher?

Teachers build the curriculum/lessons with the individual student based on his/her needs and interests rather than move through a fixed curriculum en masse.


Teachers provide the experiences and tools to access new knowledge in specific areas of interest as facilitators of individual pathways, rather than being a provider of the content or expert in one or every area,Teachers become experts in how people learn, not only in teaching.


Teachers support a community of learners in teams, possibly of multiple ages, rather than alone in classrooms with fixed grades of students.


Teachers have more autonomy over their daily schedule, and can be flexible to adjust their schedules to support student needs.


Teachers provide opportunities for real-world, connected, practical learning rather than isolated academics.
These are the types of changes in the teacher's role that are fundamental to developing students who are capable of independent learning and reinvention in a rapidly changing world.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 


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Jan Swanepoel's curator insight, May 26, 7:31 PM
During a time of significant educational change, this article addresses the contemporary question: "What is the real role of the teacher?" Teachers continue to be central to learning and students still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, however 21st century learners also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves, meaning that students must learn how to self-direct their learning. Please visit my blog at http://mymathsrules.weebly.com for my extended curator's insight.
PEEP Matisse's curator insight, May 29, 4:21 AM
On est loin des fondamentaux de l'Education Nationale, mais on peut rêver
Sarah's curator insight, June 4, 8:25 PM
This is a short article on the ways that teachers' roles are changing. It is important to note that teachers are not becoming obsolete, but are just as important as ever. Teachers are here to facilitate learning and assisting the students in becoming resilient, self directed and capable learners.