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The Padagogy Wheelhouse
A collection of knowledge about the Padagogy Wheel and all things digital that enhance learning and teaching
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Articulate Studio ’13 … Hello Boys I’m Back!

Articulate Studio ’13 … Hello Boys I’m Back! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

So when I needed to develop a very important learning module, the first with my own content in 5 years, I took the opportunity to use the newly released Articulate Studio 13 Pro  suite of software. I decided to push the envelope with pedagogy and use as many of the features to enhance learning as I could. I am impressed with what is possible and this post is about what I discovered. During the development I couldn’t help but think using this significantly upgraded software was sending a message to the elearning community a little like the classic memorable line from the Blockbuster movie Independence Day … “Hello boys I’m Back”!

Allan Carrington's insight:

Articulate Studio '13 ... Hello Boys I'm Back" <http://tinyurl.com/articulatepost>; :  Is about unpacking the module itself to highlight the pedagogy. The 18 ways I used the features of the Software to benefit the learning. This is the stuff of Professional Development for Academics, Teachers, SME's, Learning Designers and Educational Technologists.  When someone wants to develop an Interactive Learning Module (ILM),  this blog post will help them to strengthen the learning outcomes they desire. I firmly believe if you string multiple modules together with other activities and content, inserted into the learning sequences using sound educational modelling (see the comment about LAMS in the post), you will have more effective online learning and teaching, moving the student closer to life-changing transformation.

 Learning Modules are all about the students and how best to support their learning, so please let me know if this helps. Also please share if there are other features I've missed, especially how the feature strengthens the pedagogy. I would like to add them in the comments of the blog post if that is OK? In the Support of ExcellenceAllan.
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Using The Padagogy Wheel: It’s All About Grey-matter Grids (GGs)

Using The Padagogy Wheel: It’s All About Grey-matter Grids (GGs) | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

GETTING THE BEST USE OF THE WHEEL: The Padagogy Wheel was birthed out of a desire to help teachers at the coalface of teaching. A model that could be applied to everything from curriculum planning, development, writing learning objectives and designing student centered activities. Then quickly help teachers access relevant educational technology e.g. individual iPad apps or sequences of apps, to enhance those activities. Finally to help use that technology to redefine activities to include tasks previously inconceivable. This will increase student engagement, improve learning outcomes and empower a student towards transforming into an excellent graduate.

Allan Carrington's insight:

The Padagogy Wheel Teaching Model is a work in progress … always under review and improvement. Remember its purpose is a reminder to teachers to rethink everything they are doing. A warning: cutting out steps is in my opinion, part of the reason some of our teaching and learning, especially in Higher Education, is so ineffective in bringing about transformation. It is helpful to think about the Wheel as a number of grids through which you filter what you are doing – a way of thinking.

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The Padagogy Wheel V2.0: It’s all about transformation and integration

The Padagogy Wheel V2.0: It’s all about transformation and integration | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

The Padagogy Wheel has been downloaded and re-published thousands of times in the last 4 months. It has been useful to many educators.  This is a revised and upgraded version.  It includes at its core the concept of Graduate attributes and capabilities and helps the teacher or learning designer to think through how the technology enhanced activities are being designed by applying the SAMR Model as a filter on the outer circle of the wheel.  Please visit the blog post to understand how helpfult V2.0 can be.

Allan Carrington's insight:

The motivation for the Padagogy Wheel was “How do we show teachers that the pedagogy should drive the technology and not the other way around?  I am thrilled that in the first three weeks of May 2013 the Wheel poster was downloaded 6500 times and this blog is averaging 1000 visits a day at the time of publishing this post.

 

I have added Graduate attributes and capabilities to the core of the process (center of the wheel) Teachers need to start with defining what their graduates will "look" like.  Also the outer  circle is the SAMR Model to help improve how the technology will be used in the learning activities.

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Articulate Storyline: More Than Software It’s An Ecosystem

Articulate Storyline: More Than Software It’s An Ecosystem | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

The purpose of this episode and blog post is to introduce you to the Storyline Ecosystem . There are many web links and resources here – if you are serious about interactive student centric learning and in particular simulations … bookmark them all and visit regularly. Much of what follows not only works in Articulate Storyline but such other simulation development tools as Simwriter and even can be embedded or linked to Apple iBooks and iTunesU courses.

Allan Carrington's insight:

Articulate Storyline is the next generation of elearning development software. It is what I refer to as “80/20 software”.  80% or people will use 20% of the features and functionality 80% of the time and find it a satisfactory investment. (Some-what like Photoshop actually)  While the 20% of people who push the envelope, learn and use 80% of the power of SL will most likely end up as excellent educators, with outstanding student outcomes and even a few prizes along the way.

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Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, September 29, 2013 12:48 AM
thank you.
Anthea Arkcoll's curator insight, June 13, 7:45 AM

Allan Carrington, a distinguished Australian educator,  shares his blog post on the Articulate Storyline authoring software.  I always find his viewpoint of value, as I regard him as an educator deeply immersed in transformational learning.  I divert to mention that his blog makes provision for leaving audio comments as well as text comments, and he has a page dedicated to collaboration, on which he lists his areas of experience and current areas of interest, and invites like-minded parties to contact him to explore areas for collaboration. Then there's the equity and diversity page….


My favourable opinion of this scoop might be influenced - just a little - by the fact that he refers to Tom Kuhlmann of the Rapid Elearning Blog - the very first blog I ever followed.- and the Articulate Storyline community which I find incredibly active and generous.  In fact I'd regard them as the learning equivalent of the Genius bar at Apple stores.


But back to Storyline...


I've chosen to focus most on how the flexibility of Articulate Storyline allows for the creation of simulation and branched learning experiences, and for scaffolding reflective practice.  At this point in time simulations, digital  storytelling, gamification and reflective practice are my hot topics.  


The first affordance is that of creating either simple or complex branched learning.  As in all cases of branched learning, the designer is responsible for ensuring that the features and  complexity of interactions do not overwhelm the learner, or become the focus of the experience to the detriment of the intended learning.


Documents can be embedded in the activity to provide experience with actual examples of relevant paperwork (substitution on the SAMR model).


Timers can be included on individual pages, meaning that a time flow can be included in the activity (augmentation level of the SAMR model).  For example  if the learner has not selected an option within a predetermined time frame they may lose the option of choice and be directed down a specific path, or the scenario may report the presenting symptoms of the patient have progressed.


Since hyperlinks can be incorporated, the learner could be directed out to other websites  -  perhaps to add insights to a preconstructed form on a wiki, or to make comments on a class blog.  This also allows the opportunity for 'independent research points' where the learner is encouraged to search external information sources for material to determine their actions in the simulation  eg.  might leave the simulation to search the websites of peak professional bodies for current policy or best practice recommendations   (augmentation on the SAMR model).  


Media files can be embedded in the activity by the developer , so that provides the potential for including audio or video materials which provide the perspective of different individuals and encourages a multidisciplinary approach.    For example a child with hearing loss might describe  the difficulty they experience listening in the noise of the classroom and social environments.  The parents describe the impact of the hearing difficulty on the family as a whole and the concerns they have for the impact of hearing loss on their child's life now and into the future.  Siblings might describe the impact on family communication patterns and the reactions of others outside the family.   Additional clips could provide the viewpoint of other educational and allied health professionals such as teachers, learning support tutors, speech pathologists etc.   In my setting I regard this as bordering between modification and redefinition on the SAMR scale, as accessing this rich network of experience would be impossible in synchronous, face to face learning, working with groups average one to five learners at a time, with a need for the learning opportunitiesto be available on an ongoing basis.

This scaffolding of experience means the learner is more likely to recognise the value of creating a personal support network and maintaining involvement in professional network groups, using social media tools such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter as well as the forum areas of industry specific professional organisations and client support groups.

Text entry fields can be used to create  "Stop and Think' points where individual learners are required to pause and enter their reflection on the factors which influenced their path selection in branched learning.  In small group activities the same principle could be applied to create 'Stop and Negotiate' points where the group as a whole must negotiate which path is taken, and document the factors and group dynamics which influenced their choice.  The quality of reflection could then be rated and used to shape the feedback provided to the learners.


This approach could be used as a way of developing awareness of different cultural perspectives in a diverse group.  In my situation where there is a small professional workforce which often has limited cultural diversity amongst the learners themselves, it would be a way of addressing sensitivity to the cultural needs and sensitivities of our clients.


A powerful way to model reflective practice, when working with branched learning simulations, would be to include a point, or points, along the branching where the learner is asked to reflect on their choices to date and to decide if they would change any of their decisions if given the opportunity.  If the learner did elect to go back and take an alternative path they could be given the opportunity to decide how far back in the decision making process they return.  (redefinition on the SAMR scale).


 It should be noted that the learners are not able to upload media files directly into published Storyline activities, and so for this reason it is most powerful when link outs are used to take advantage of the affordance of other tools, such as wikis, where in completing the activity, learners could create and upload a role play of the interaction which might occur at a case conference meeting.


Alternatively, the branching capacity of Storyline could also be used to create scenarios to provoke discussion around topics  which are sensitive in medicine, such as euthanasia, or determining whether the same rigour is applied in deciding whether to order precautionary investigations when the client is very elderly, for example investigation of potential acoustic neuroma, or allocation of public health funding for cochlear implants for clients over 90 years of age..  


The use of 'Stop and Think' or 'Share an Opinion' data fields allows for evaluation of the development of thought process using a scale such as the seven point scale of reflective thinking proposed by King and Kitchener (1994) covering, pre-reflective, quasi reflective and reflective thinking.   This allows the learning environment to be structured to assess how people decide what they believe about vexing problems and the process of reaching judgments about complex or controversial problems.


Simulations provide a safe learning environment to explore challenging issues around service delivery.   The ability to embed media files in the activity can also be of benefit in this situation.  It has been reported that when exposed to depictions of healing in media, students experience an emotional idealism which, while short lived, enables them to focus on the overriding positive aspects of the calling to work in health care and consequently better cope with dire situations encountered during training.


In summary, I regard Articulate Storyline as useful tool for constructivist learning, both afforadances that accommodate both cognitive and social constructivism.



King, K. M. B . & Kitchener, K. S. (1994). Developing reflective judgment: inderstanding and promoting intellectual growth and critical thinking in adolescents and adults. SanFrancisco: Jossey-Bass.


Kumagai, A.K. (2008).  A conceptual framework for the use of illness narratives in medical education.  Academic Medicine, 83, 653-658.


Shapiro, J. & Rucker, L. (2004).  The Don Quixote effect: why going to the movies can help develop empathy and altruism in medical students and residents.  Families, Systems and Health:  The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare, 22, 445-452.


Shapiro, J. & Rucker, L. (2003).   Can poetry make better doctors?  Teaching the humanities and arts to medical students and residents at the University of California, Irvine, College of Medicine.  Academic Medicine, 78, 323-328.














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A Passion for Immersive Learning … a Nine-Year Journey!

A Passion for Immersive Learning … a Nine-Year Journey! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

“Learning (and teaching, such as it is) is not a process of communication, but rather, a process of immersion." I re-discovered the above quote on a one of my seminar slides.  Profound stuff and it was in fact 2004, when I received an unexpected email from someone who subsequently became a good friend and colleague meeting face-to-face 1.5 years later, after regular weekly Skype chats and collaborative projects together.  Dr Randall Kindley from Minnesota USA introduced me to what we called then Scenario-Based Learning (SBL), Situational Learning (SL), Simulations, eSims, Role Plays and Games.  This was all describing a methodology now becoming of age, which is often called Immersive Learning (IL).

Allan Carrington's insight:

In 2007 while on a trip to the USA I was introduced to a software product called Simwriter.  It was in its early development and I have been tracking it’s progress ever since. Late in 2012 I received from NexLearn the publishers, notification about an exciting new development in IL.  The Immersive Leaning University (ILU) was having a Conference and Symposium in San Antonio TX in Jan 2013.  Thanks to some significant prize money from 2012, I was able to attend and it was really worth it.  My passion for IL has been rekindled and now “we have the technology!”. I am now exploring, learning and developing with  three major software offerings and invoite you to join me on the journey.

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LAMS: The Future of Student Centric Learning Design

LAMS: The Future of Student Centric Learning Design | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

“LAMS is not really a LMS as such, it integrates with both Moodle and Blackboard and provides teachers with a highly intuitive visual authoring environment for creating sequences of learning activities. These activities can include a range of individual tasks, small group work and whole class activities based on both content and collaboration” (LAMS website). I believe this is the most useful tool for developing strong pedagogy in learning design, Higher Education has available. And when I tell people in workshops “it is Learning Design, not for dummies, but time strapped academics”, I usually have their attention.

Allan Carrington's insight:

I discovered this wonderful new software platform in 2005 and have been tracking its development ever since.  In June 2011, I developed a workshop entitled “It’s All About the Students”. Forty academics attended and agreed with me about the importance of the students, and many committed to pilot the pedagogies and technologies. The software is open source and the best way to understand why I am excited about LAMS for Learning Design is to visit http://www.LessonLAMS.com sign up (it’s free) and “play” with it …. you will see the potential.


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The Padagogy Wheel … it’s a Bloomin’ Better Way to Teach

The Padagogy Wheel … it’s a Bloomin’ Better Way to Teach | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

Is this just a misspelling or is it something more important and how does it work? It is truly all about the students. Teachers, as many of you know, strive to define learning outcomes across more than one intellectual behaviour of the taxonomy. I personally strive to set a learning outcome from each of Remembering/Understanding, Applying, Analysing, Evaluating and Creating. I encourage teachers to spend quality “caffeine-charged” time  with the action verbs. Next ask yourself the question “By the time the student/learner completes this workshop they should be able to (add the action verb)“. Then think about what activity or product which might achieve this.  You are well on your way to defining learning goals which are higher order thinking skills and getting your technology to serve the pedagogy.

Allan Carrington's insight:

THE PADAGOGY WHEEL: I am honoured that so many people find this helpful - as I write (031613) would you believe it has 229 reposts in Scoop and in Google as a search string it gets 803,000 results. I am the first to agree that some of these apps might be better placed elsewhere on the wheel also there are more than one place for each app and there is constant need for updating as new apps are released. Please help me with suggestions as to HOW it can be updated and telling me which apps for example, need adding or replacing.  Where I am planning to take this next is to link to the apps, exemplar ways they have been used to achieve the learning outcomes mapped to the cognitive domains. Also to develop "app powered learning sequences" i.e. connecting more than one app together to build a learning activity sequence.  This will IMHO generate a highly engaging flow of transformational learning .... what do you and others think?

Also I thought some people might also find my 1.57 min video thought provoking. In it I introduce this wheel and more research I am working on with graduate attributes, Please visit http://tinyurl.com/padwheelvid which will be redirected to YouTube. I am calling the method the CAMERA Method .. "Capabilities and Attributes Mapping for Educational Results inspiring Achievement" ... it's all about the students being all they can be.  It is about mapping everything back to graduate attributes, values and capabilities  These are more than learning outcomes, they are an attempt to define a graduate.

There is also the podcast episode I did with Prof Geoff Scott of the Uni of Western Sydney. He has done years of research into graduate capabilities (aka values or attributes) It is fascinating stuff in the context of Technology Enhanced Learning and Teaching. He has asked the people who give the jobs and catalogued what the respective industries in the market place want in graduates. Duh! Look at the list and ask yourself are they being developed in students from Higher Education or in Education in general ... this is why mapping is so important. Are we equipping graduates to excel and make a difference .... hmmm! Have a look and listen to http://tinyurl.com/alsltblog. "If you exercise these capabilities ... you will be employed!" This sort of stuff makes the "CAMERA method" worth developing. Comments are welcome guys and thanks ... Allan.

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Graduate Attributes – Spin or Education?

Graduate Attributes – Spin or Education? | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

In this podcast episode Simon Walker is the head of the Education Development Unit (EDU) at the University of Greenwich talks about the University of Greenwich Graduate Attributes long term initiative which started in 2009 to develop academic skills and framework and to push this into a pedagogical framework.  A great deal of research and a couple of years later the university believes their graduates are about good scholarship and independent thinking they are about confident and distinctive students always learning and always developing with creativity at it’s core.

Allan Carrington's insight:

They have identified three dimension of attributes :

Scholarship and AutonomyCreativity and EnterpriseCross cultural and international awareness
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National Citations for Passion … It doesn’t get much better than that!

National Citations for Passion … It doesn’t get much better than that! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

“On behalf of the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) I am pleased to advise that your nomination for a 2012 Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning has been successful” that opening line of an email made my week .. actually it made my last 10 years.  I grabbed the mobile and called a good friend and colleague “Did you get it?” …. pause  ”Yeees! did you?”  ”Yep!” was the best I could reply in the excitement.  I was talking to Linda Westphalen from the School of Education here at the University of Adelaide.  We had just found out both of us had been successful in winning a National Citation or award, that is the top of the Learning and Teaching heap for the Higher Education space in Australia.  Only 152 of these prestigious citations are granted across 38 universities and Adelaide has been granted two and we did it.  Besides the kudos which is big, it comes with a A$10,000 prize for professional development … that is also nice.

Allan Carrington's insight:

This podcast episode is the first in a series of conversations together to discuss the teachable moments we both have had while reading each others citation applications.  We have links below to download our application documents and I encourage you to read them, as they are roadmaps on our journeys and full of personal “ah ahas”.  We never saw each others application before submission, yet the overlaps were significant. In the podcast Linda refers to them as bookends of the same thing – I agree.  The title hopefully got your attention, for to achieve best practice a teacher must be passionate about their content and their craft.  However as Linda shares in this podcast  a good teacher must also have a passionate care for their students as well.

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There’s good MOOCs and there’s, well … good teaching makes the difference!

There’s good MOOCs and there’s, well … good teaching makes the difference! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it
Allan Carrington's insight:

Prof Curt Bonk is in high demand around the world as a keynote speaker and someone who can shake up the status quo and engage academics and encourage them to seek excellence in practice.   In this episode Curt explains why MOOCs suddenly have got the entire Higher Education Sector talking.  He shares from the lessons he has learnt from his first MOOC in May of 2012.  As only Curt can, he has developed 20 teacher and facilitator guidelines that make a good MOOC and in this episode he expands many of these concepts.

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If you exercise these capabilities ... you will be employed

If you exercise these capabilities ... you will be employed | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it
Allan Carrington's insight:

Prof. Geoff West from the University of Western Sydney talks about the capabilities aka attributes that industry leaders want in graduates. These ain't theory they are facts from from years of research... HE pay attention! How do we map these to learning outcomes, activities and the needed technology to help students excel in these, get employed and make a difference? Any one got any ideas?

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At The Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement

At The Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

The new version of the Padagogy Wheel tackles a major question that is lurking in the back of everyone’s mind. If it’s not … it should be. It’s about the problem of motivation in education. How do we motivate students, teachers, parents, and everyone else to get excited about learning? How do you stay motivated? What works and what doesn’t?”

Jeff Dunn: Editor Edudemic Blog Post:

"Updated Padagogy Wheel Tackles The Problem Of Motivation in Education" (http://tinyurl.com/edudemicpadwheel2)

Allan Carrington's insight:

In this third podcast episode with Ken Spero, a Senior Strategist with The Regis Company, in Philadelphia, USA we talk about how the pedagogy of Immersive Learning is ideal to tackle the problem of motivation and hits the bullseye at the core of The Padagogy Wheel.

Ken introduces Engagement into the equation and how it drives motivation for learning. He talks about the relationship between motivation and learning design, arguing that the more motivated the learner is, the less context and learning design is needed, and vice versa. – hmmm, now reflecting on that takes more than one cup of coffee for sure.

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Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 7:06 PM

I think I will find this very useful for my planning

Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, September 29, 2013 12:43 AM
I repeat.it is great.
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, September 29, 2013 4:14 AM

Three key components for Motivation: Autonomy, Purpose and Mastery .

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The Padagogy Wheel V3.0: Learning Design starts with graduate attributes, capabilities and motivation

The Padagogy Wheel V3.0: Learning Design starts with graduate attributes, capabilities and motivation | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

This is the third version of the Padagogy Wheel ... it adds more resources at the core of the wheel. It adds more information about Graduate Attributes and Capabilities. However the major part of the upgrade is adding a model for understanding motivation, a vital part of learning design.

Allan Carrington's insight:

I am still a little numb at the amazing interest in, and discussion about, the Padagogy Wheel from teachers and educators around the world. It is only a week since I published V2.0. and the poster is at 8000 downloads and 500-800 people visit the blog a day and about 300 tweets a day as well.. I owe a sincere thank you to Jeff Dunn and the team at Edudemic for the encouraging first article “Integrate iPads Into Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy With This ‘Padagogy Wheel’”  then the second blog post “New Padagogy Wheel Helps You Integrate Technology Using SAMR Model”  The second article really did whip up an interest storm. I think you will appreciate the posts.

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Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, September 29, 2013 12:40 AM
Allan,it is great,thank you!!!!
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Do it then teach it: learning from and building on experience

Do it then teach it: learning from and building on experience | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

The more I share with Ken Spero about immersive learning and building e-simulations, the more I am convinced that the creative hard work end of building these powerful learning objects happens before anyone starts using any sort of software.

Allan Carrington's insight:

This is the second of three podcast episodes we are doing to lay the pedagogical foundations and practical guidelines to help learning designers and teachers build Immersive Learning Micro Simulations (ILMS). 

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The Benefits of Scenario-Based Learning … the New Instructional Design

The Benefits of Scenario-Based Learning … the New Instructional Design | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

Ken Spero is a Senior Strategist with The Regis Company, and who helped design and launch the Immersive Learning University (ILU).  Ken has been thought leading, teaching, promoting and supporting Scenario-based eLearning (aka Immersive Learning) for almost 25 years. His experience and understanding of the subject is awesome and you need to listen to the podcast a couple of times at least.  In this episode recorded on SKYPE with Ken in Philadelphia USA with me (Allan) in Adelaide South Australia.I asked Ken the question, “What are the benefits of Scenario-Based Learning” and in this podcast episode he unpacks seven benefits

Allan Carrington's insight:

I encourage you to reflect on these and think about your own teaching opportunities. Ken explains the following seven benefits of Scenario-Based Learning:

1. They are a Form of Storytelling | 2. They Engage Our Emotions | 3. They Enable "Failing Forward" | 4. They Promote Critical Thinking | 5. They Accelerate Time | 6. They Provide Shared Context | 7. They Trigger Our Memories

This podcast episode will help you develop simularions that engage learners.

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The Continuum of Shift

The Continuum of Shift | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

In 2007 I was making a joint presentation with a colleague from the USA. She introduced  the concept of a continuum along which a teacher can move based on how he/she teaches. We called it the Continuum of Shift.

Allan Carrington's insight:
This concept has been a great help to me as a support person, helping teaching faculty in higher education. How easily a teacher can move their pedagogy along this continuum I’m sure is what makes a great teacher in higher education for the 21st century. As I have worked with the Continuum of Shift over the last 5 years I have pondered the questions.  How can I help an academic:

 

• Easily focus on activity centred learning• Increase student engagement• Deliver content more efficiently and student centred• Turn valuable face-to-face time into deeper learning experiences. 

I believe I have found a way … it is called LAMS!

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Quality Feedback: It’s all about the Students

Quality Feedback: It’s all about the Students | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

Plato in about 430 BC said that “necessity is the mother of invention”, just imagine what he would have said if he had an iPad :-)  Well it was necessity that inspired Simon Smith, a good friend and colleague now at the University of South Australia, to develop a work flow for e-assessment that brings tears to an academics eyes … well almost. Im not joking I have actually seen academics arguing who will get Simon first to teach their staff this method. Go to the blog post and get your head around it, it could change how you grade students work.

Allan Carrington's insight:

This is win/win for both the teacher and the student. We are getting reports it saves about 33% of the teachers time would you believe

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Collaborative Learning … What No Lectures!

Collaborative Learning … What No Lectures! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it

Paul Gagnon is the Director of eLearning of the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.  In this podcast episode Paul talks about their innovative approach to medical education, based on the concepts of Team Based Learning  which is gaining traction around the world, especially in Medical Science education. However Lee Kong Chian is taking it to the next level.  They are moving away from the paper based approach and going mobile. It is exciting to see how they will be using LAMS and iPads to connect with the students, engage them and sustain that engagement.

Allan Carrington's insight:
They are calling it Collaborative Learning and believe it will address the challenge that medical students need to have mastered the fundamental foundational body of knowledge and that the teachers must be confident that they know what the students know, as well as what they don’t know. Paul shares how TBL has an advantage in this over Problem Based Learning.
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The Best Professional Learning Experience of My Career

The Best Professional Learning Experience of My Career | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it
Allan Carrington's insight:

Thats quite a claim for someone who has experienced as many learning and teaching conferences as I have and interviewed and learnt from 200+ thought leaders in Higher Education for our podcast programme over the years. When I was selected by Apple for the Apple Distinguished Educator’s Global Institute in Cork Ireland in July 2012 I never anticipated what a mind expanding event the entire experience would be. I was thrilled to be one of the 234 ADEs chosen from the 600 applicants and to have the funds to travel from my university award prize money.

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Course design … it’s flipping different!

Course design … it’s flipping different! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it
Allan Carrington's insight:

The question I (Allan) get asked most over the last 10 years is “How do I build an online course, how do I use technology in my teaching?”  This led to the development of a new presentation I have called “A Flipping Better Way to Learn”.  The presentation we hope will help answer these questions.  In today’s episode we start with curriculum design and as we unpack the process which we think you will agree …. is flipping different.  Different in that we start at the end and reengineer backwards from the articulated description of the graduate through the process of transformation.  The traditional place to start with a course is the body of knowledge. Sometimes via a textbook and sometimes via the gathered knowledge and experience of the teacher.  In this episode we suggest that is the wrong place to start to design a course.

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Motivation and Retention Online … “Bonknam Style”!

Motivation and Retention Online … “Bonknam Style”! | The Padagogy Wheelhouse | Scoop.it
Allan Carrington's insight:

This short podcast episode is the second with Curt Bonk when he was visiting Adelaide in November 2012.  I asked what was the next contribution to online learning and teaching we could expect from him.  Curt describes the new online resource and book he an a colleague in NZ are about to release. It is about how teachers can improve motivation and retention in online courses.

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