The P2P Daily
29.2K views | +0 today
Follow
The P2P Daily
Monitoring peer to peer trends in every aspect of social life
Curated by P2P Foundation
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by P2P Foundation from Web of Things
Scoop.it!

Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone

Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone | The P2P Daily | Scoop.it
"Glass is continuously improving via over-the-air updates and new applications, and we have no doubt that in time, Glass will be the next iPhone," the Forrester study says.

 

"Roughly 21.6 million Americans would buy Google Glass if it were available, a new Forrester report says. But the current Explorer version is more of a Newton — Apple’s flawed and failed PDA — than an iPhone.
That’s 12 percent of the adult population.


In fact, despite the current prototype model’s limited battery life and restrictive API, Glass is more of a “when” than an “if” product, according to the survey of more than 4,600 U.S. adults.

 


Via ddrrnt
more...
ddrrnt's curator insight, June 20, 2013 10:34 PM

The easy access to location-based info in full AR is applauded.
Also, bone conduction is said to provide great audio quality, "without disrupting others who are nearby."

 

John Koetsier from VentureBeat contrasts Noam Chomsky’s belief that Glass is a privacy-destroying, Orwellian technology (http://youtu.be/rz1AImQ5jqA), with Forrester's view, "that Glass is not a good covert-surveillance camera — it’s too obvious, and its battery life is too limited."

 

I recall previously curated privacy concerns:
The efforts to ban ... http://goo.gl/IktYb (G+)
The pleas for policies ... http://goo.gl/GV9vW (G+)

 

thanks Tyger AC

Rescooped by P2P Foundation from Gentlemachines
Scoop.it!

Google and Skyhook: the internet privacy invasion | openDemocracy

Google and Skyhook: the internet privacy invasion | openDemocracy | The P2P Daily | Scoop.it

Via Artur Alves
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by P2P Foundation from Web of Things
Scoop.it!

Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother?

Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother? | The P2P Daily | Scoop.it

Say goodbye to privacy: In the future, advertisers, app makers, the government, and even our employers might be able to assess our personalities and react based on what we do with our phones.

 

Oliver Brdiczka, a manager at PARC, is working on contextual intelligence. The research, he hopes, will allow enterprises and the government to use data that is accumulated as we use our mobile phones. The data mined from our email messages, Facebook conversations, and sensors in the phone can be used for a variety of purposes, including intelligence, marketing and app design, even employee relations. In other words, owning a smart phone with this capability will be like having a spy ratting out your thoughts to the government.

 

For instance, PARC is working on a project that predicts a person's personality through their online behavior. The idea, Brdiczka said, is to market this data to enterprises, who want to know people's intent for targeted advertising or developing content customization. (...)

 

"Imagine a device that immediately lights up when you hold it in your hand and offers you the five most likely things you were going to do next: call your co-worker, drive to the meeting you're about to have, book a dinner or catch up on that article that you wanted to read," said Cue CEO Daniel Gross. "We'll be able to breathe life into our current phones, which currently only do things when we explicitly tell them every detail of what we want to do."


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by P2P Foundation from Web of Things
Scoop.it!

‘Smart Cities’ On The Increase, Despite Obstacles And Risks | Risk Watchdog

The establishment of ‘smart cities’ globally is being driven by the growing need to augment/automate a wide range of legacy productivity, distribution, and consumption platforms. Current and forecast population growth and urbanisation trends demand the creation of hundreds of new cities – or new communities within existing cities – over the next couple of decades, and this is an ideal time to develop, test and implement new technologies to replace outmoded and inefficient platforms.

 

[...]

 

But, security and data privacy are treated as an after-thought. Somebody else’s problem, effectively, according to several people I spoke to. This is worrying if the majority of systems are to be routinely deeply interconnected in the future. A simple virus could shut off the national grid, crash aircraft, or send nuclear reactors critical. A forthcoming BMI Special Report will look at the development of the ‘Internet Of Things’ and, in particular, at the risks associated with making all critical systems too interdependent.


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.