Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities
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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities | Scoop.it

The ‘Indigenous language map’ is an excellent resource for teachers to use in their stage 2 classroom. This resource is an interactive map displaying the various language groups of the Aboriginal people Australia wide. The map demonstrates the high number of Indigenous languages that were used by Aboriginal communities. Using the interactive element of the map allows educators to focus on the languages used in their local area. Interactive resources are an excellent way to engage children and encourage active learning where children not only solve problems, but create their own problems (Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 2000).

 

Although interactive, this is quite a simple resource which would allow for flexible integration into lesson plans. In conjunction with this map, it would be helpful to invite a local Aboriginal Elder to come in and speak about the Indigenous languages of the local area and the importance of language in Aboriginal culture. After reviewing the map and hearing the Elder speak, students would be provided with a simple map of Australia and asked to mark their local community area and identify the language spoken by the people of this area. Students could also label regions which bordered their local community yet spoke another language. Once this task is completed, students could be divided into language groups to help highlight the importance of language and its ties to community in Aboriginal culture.

 

The creations of personalised local area maps would also be useful to promote further investigation into the traditional inhabitants of their local community. Students could work in groups to research the names of local clans and identify any significant sites for these traditional inhabitants. These maps could be compared amongst class members and displayed around the classroom. This activity would help to highlight the diversity of the Aboriginal people and also highlight the importance of community to these people. It directly ties in with HSIE outcome CUS 2.3 & 2.4 and ENS 2.5 (Board of Studies, 2006) and could be integrated with outcomes from the Mathematics syllabus by including skills such as mapping. 

 

Reference List:

 

Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies.

 

Bransford, J., Brown, A., & Cocking, R. (1999). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

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SBS: First Australians

SBS: First Australians | Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities | Scoop.it

‘First Australians’ is an interactive website which looks at Australia from the perspective of the original inhabitants. The website offers access to all seven episodes of the series as well as a discovery feature which allows one to follow the timeline of Australia and select and listen to stories of particular relevance. The seven episode documentary series was created by Rachel Perkins, an Arrente woman, in consultation with the descendants of those whose stories are told. As such, it offers an Aboriginal perspective of Australian history. This resource is particularly useful for the outcomes CUS2.3 and CUS2.4. Focusing specifically on the original inhabitants, this website offers access to resources which focus on many of the clans and language groups of the Aboriginal people including the Eora people. For students not within this region, this website would be equally applicable.

 

This is an excellent resource for interactive learning as it features hundreds of audiovisual resources and enables the audience to interact with the timeline of Australia and select stories of interest. Research shows that the use of multimedia has the ability to create high quality learning environments (Cairncross & Mannion, 2001). Nonetheless, educators must be conscious of the way in which these resources are integrated with the curriculum. As such, teachers need to review the material and be selective about what they wish to focus on.

 

Although the episodes are very informative, playing a whole episode would not be entirely appropriate and would not encourage further discussion or reflection. Therefore, in regards to teaching about the original inhabitants of the land I would use the ‘250 Nations’ mini-clip resources on this website. Using the language groups and cultural diversity resources would be particularly useful as an introduction into the discussion about the Eora people. Following interaction with these resources, students could create a timeline (pictorial, verbal or interactive) about the history of Eora people.  In this process students may wish to focus on the Eora people as a whole or a member of the Eora people. Extra resources may be required and students would be encouraged to extra resources including http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/events/exhibitions/2006/eora/docs/eora-guide.pdf, http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/discover_collections/history_nation/indigenous/eora/ and http://www.historyofaboriginalsydney.edu.au/central#. This resource could also be used successfully in conjunction with the Indigenous language map http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/ to create personalised student maps of their local community area. 

 

Reference List:

Australian Broadcasting Commission. (2013). Indigenous language map. Retrieved March 3, 2013, from: http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/

 

Cairncross, S. & Mannion, M. (2001). Interactive multimedia and learning: realising the benefits. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 38(2), 156-164.

 

State Library of New South Wales. (2011). Eora: Aboriginal Australians. Retrieved March 27, 2013, from: http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/discover_collections/history_nation/indigenous/eora/

 

State Library of New South Wales. (2006) Eora: Mapping Aboriginal Sydney 1770-1850. Retrieved from the State Library of New South Wales wesbite: http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/events/exhibitions/2006/eora/docs/eora-guide.pdf ;

 

University of Sydney. (2013). A history of Aboriginal Sydney: Central – Sydney Aboriginal history. Retrieved April 14, 2013, from: http://www.historyofaboriginalsydney.edu.au/central#

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Lauren Chapman's curator insight, April 15, 2013 7:53 AM

This resource is a powerful and deeply moving resource, which allows students to gain insight into the journey of British colonist and what this meant for indigenous Australians. This series is well presented and researched which holds an invaluable Indigenous perspective as Aboriginal Academics have had an active role in the development of this documentary series. This resource is beneficial for teachers to grasp a deeper understanding of Australian history and provokes an emotive response, which enables teachers to teach from a viewpoint of personal attachment rather than a simple presentation of facts. Not only, is this resource of great assistance to teachers for understanding Australian history, it is of value when used appropriately to support students understanding of stage two HSIE. As the series is highly emotive and possibly graphic at times, stage two students would only be show clips of various episodes and not the whole series. As this resource will be used in the first lesson of the series, students will be introduced to the topic and brainstorm what they know about pre-colonial Australia. Students will watch a short clip of the documentary and discuss the key values and customs that were obvious in the stories of both Indigenous and Colonial Australians.

Students will take time to think-pair-share about what they think would come up as obvious values, traditions, symbols and customs if the documentary was done in their local area (Balmain East) and discuss ways in which these are different or similar to that which they would appear if the documentary was done in their area in pre-colonial and colonial times.

The aim of this lesson is to enlighten students to the notion that past people and events of our local area shape the development and preservation of the customs and traditions that we see (or no longer see) today.

When used sparingly and thoughtfully, this series wonderfully compliments the ideas presented in the proposed lesson sequence, as it would provide students with a direct connection to the people who have gone before them and ask they to connect personally with individuals in the stories presented. 

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Welcome to Explore & More's Cultures for Kids

This website is an excellent resource for teachers and children alike. It is an interactive website which has detailed information about multiple countries, thus it would be extremely useful for embedding a global perspective of different cultures. Global education is a key element of the Australian Curriculum which aims to promote global citizens who value diversity, are open minded and who can contribute to a peaceful and sustainable world (Education Services Australia, 2008). Further this website would be helpful to address the Australian Curriculums cross curriculum priority of ‘Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia’, in particular Asia and its diversity OI.1 (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, n.d.). 

 

This website uses a diverse array of content types which include audio, visual and written material. The use of audio visual material is particularly good in creating a stimulating and interactive environment conducive to learning (Carding, 2012). Howard Gardner proposed the idea of multiple intelligences which are often referred to as the seven learning styles – that is, the visual - spatial, bodily - kinaesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, linguistic and logical – mathematical (Weiss, 2000).  In each of these different learning styles, one likes to learn through with specific tools such as pictures, audio and using your body. Thus, the use of different styles of material will help address some of the learning styles of our students.

 

In order to involve students in their learning process and give them some autonomy over their learning, I would encourage them to pick one of the three Asian countries and use the website to work toward outcome CUS 2.4 -  Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities (Board of Studies, 2006). I would use this website as a starting point for students to create a project about the country of their choice. Students could be encouraged to choose one or multiple mediums for delivery of the presentation such as an oral presentation, creating a poster or creating a multimedia presentation. In order to achieve this, teachers may like students to access the additional resources such as the http://www.timeforkids.com/ website which also offers access to information about countries around the world and their cultures and ways of living.  Further, on completion of this subject area the class or stage 2 group may like to have a cultural diversity and identities day in which students dress in their traditional clothes, bring in food from their home country and invite local community groups from a diverse range of backgrounds, including local Aboriginal community members, to share and celebrate their cultures with the school community. 

 

Reference List:

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d.). Cross Curriculum priorities. Retrieved April 13, 2013, from: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/CrossCurriculumPriorities/Asia-and-Australias-engagement-with-Asia

 

Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies.

 

Carding, C. (2012). The Importance of Audio Visual Technology in Education. Retrieved April 13, 2013, from: http://educationcloset.com/2012/11/26/the-importance-of-audio-visual-technology-in-education-guest-post/ ;

 

Education Services Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Victoria, Australia: Commonwealth of Australia. 

 

Time Incorporated. (2013). Time for Kids. Retrieved April 12, 2013, from: http://www.timeforkids.com/

 

Weiss, R. P. (2000). Howard Gardner talks technology. Training & Development, 54(9), 52-56. 

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Carolyn Vlahov's curator insight, October 11, 2014 10:43 PM

Culture from a Global Perspective........

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talkingidentity.pdf

‘Talking Identity’ is a teacher’s booklet for Human Society and Its Environment stage 2 created by the NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum directorate. The booklet focuses on identity, primarily from an Aboriginal perspective, and addresses nine main topics including; the land, the lore and the Dreaming, community, families and our heritage. ‘Talking Identity’ provides teaching notes, background information and practical help for teaching including teaching sequences and student worksheets. ‘Talking Identity’ is a useful resource for teachers as it will help teachers understand and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in accordance with standard 2, focus area 2.4, of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (2012).

 

Although ‘Talking Identity’ offers many helpful ways to embed Aboriginal perspectives, it is always beneficial to have a community member teach about their own culture and community. This is particularly relevant in Aboriginal culture as there is a rich history of oral transmission of stories which existed long before writing was invented (Reynolds, 2009). Therefore, inviting a local Elder to come to the school and discuss the history of the traditional land inhabitants would generally be more productive for students.

 

Students could brainstorm some questions they would like answered and post these on the wall for use on the day of the talk. During, or immediately following, the talk students could complete worksheet 22 from this workbook and then use worksheet 27 to complete a mind map about Aboriginal identity, particularly focusing on what things the Elder tied to her identity.  This could be followed up by creating a song or dance about the traditional land owners and presenting it to the Aboriginal Elder at a later date.  These activities would help students to identify traditional land inhabitants, explain their contribution to our community identity and understand different customs, symbols and traditions in order to celebrate the diversity of our local community as in accordance with the syllabus. 

 

Reference List:

AITSL. (2012). Professional Knowledge. Retrieved April 7, 2013, from: http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalKnowledge/Standards/2

 

Reynolds, R. (2009). Teaching studies of society and environment in the primary school. Victoria, Australia: Oxford University Press.

 

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BaramiBarabuguWalkTour.pdf

‘Barani, Barrabugu/ Yesterday, Tomorrow’ is a booklet created by the City of Sydney’s history program in conjunction with members from the City of Sydney’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander advisory panel. It was created for the Sustainable Sydney 2030 Strategy to provide a history of sites within the City of Sydney that are linked to the history of the Aboriginal people. This booklet concentrates on the journey of the people of the Eora language.

 

This booklet is an excellent resource for teaching about the traditional inhabitants as it provides written and visual information about the Eora people and sites of relevance whilst also providing opportunities for further exploration. The sites of relevance are divided into specific categories and range from sites of early contact to sites that exist and run today. This is particularly useful as it enables students to understand the impact the traditional inhabitants had in our local community and highlights their continuing relevance. Apart from the written content, this booklet also offers students and visitors the opportunity to partake in four different walks through the city which pass sites of significance and also lists some excellent visitor experience sites. 

 

I would encourage the use of this booklet in conjunction with one or more of the walks or visitor experiences. Partaking in such activities would encourage active learning and help children to see connections between objects and life (Dogan, 2010). Visiting a museum is a particularly useful way to increase student interest and knowledge as they promote active learning, provide the opportunity to work first hand with sources and they encourage students to learn through different methods (Dogan, 2010). Completing these (or similar) activities would promote discussions about how shared customs, practices and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities in  accordance with outcomes CUS 2.3 of the HSIE syllabus. 

 

Reference List:

Dogan, Y. (2010). Primary school students’ benefiting from museums with educational purposes. International Journal of Social Inquiry, 3(2), pp. 137-164. 

 

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Lauren Chapman's curator insight, April 15, 2013 8:07 PM

This resource allows students to make a connection to place, present, past and future. By allowing students to explore a resource around the significance of place for people in times past and present, student cognitively make connections between the studied place and that which they themselves belong to. This resource enables students to understand the impact that people have upon their environment and the affect that the land has upon individuals to which they belong. Students are encouraged to reflect critically on this resource and think about the impact of such on the preservation of Indigenous culture within the Sydney community. The booklet provides a practical framework for teaching about the original inhabitants of the land and achieves this through both visual and written channels. Information is presented categorically which allows students to understand the impact of inhabitants on the local community and supports them in making sense of the text. This resource will be used as a template for students to craft their own walking Tour of their local area where they will be asked to reflect on different significant places and the people who have walked before them and called it home. Along with the lesson framework, teachers can further utilize this resource by organizing an excursion through City of Sydney Walking Tours. “Partaking in such activities would encourage active learning and help children to see connections between objects and life” (Dogan, 2010). Thoughtful use of this resource provides students with a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in history in a hands-on manner, “visiting a museum is a particularly useful way to increase student interest and knowledge as they promote active learning, provide the opportunity to work first hand with sources and they encourage students to learn through different methods” (Dogan, 2010). Use of this resource, along with lesson series, aims to enhance student’s understanding of the relationship between place and person and explore the impact of colonization upon the preservation or destruction of place-based identity.