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Sustainable Energy Roadmaps | Worldwatch Institute

Sustainable Energy Roadmaps | Worldwatch Institute | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Transitioning from a carbon-intensive economy to a low-carbon future presents challenges and opportunities for developing countries. The Sustainable Energy Roadmaps help countries successfully navigate the change to an infrastructure capable of meeting the energy challenges of the 21st century.


The approach examines a country’s potential for renewable energy production such as wind, solar, small hydropower and biomass. Existing energy infrastructure is analyzed to identify the potential for, and hurdles to, increased efficiency and energy storage. At the same time, current socio-economic and policy environments are factored into the analysis to identify barriers to low-carbon development and determine international best practices to suggest how they can be overcome. Equally important, funding options that might be available from private, public, and multilateral institutions to help bring renewable energy projects into being are assessed.

The project strengthens government and civil society capacity, enhances stakeholder engagement, and advances policies that combat climate change...


Learn more about the program and sustainable energy roadmaps at the article link.


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Michelle Coe's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:27 PM

Some US states need to follow this roadmap!

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We’re All Climate-Change Idiots

We’re All Climate-Change Idiots | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

CLIMATE CHANGE is staring us in the face. The science is clear, and the need to reduce planet-warming emissions has grown urgent. So why, collectively, are we doing so little about it?

 

Yes, there are political and economic barriers, as well as some strong ideological opposition, to going green. But researchers in the burgeoning field of climate psychology have identified another obstacle, one rooted in the very ways our brains work.  ... 

 

We have trouble imagining a future drastically different from the present. We block out complex problems that lack simple solutions.

 

... energy monitors that displayed consumption levels in real-time cut energy use by an average of 7 percent, according to a study in the journal Energy in 2010. Telling heavy energy users how much less power their neighbors consumed prompted them to cut their own use, according to a 2007 study in Psychological Science. And trading on our innate laziness, default settings have also conserved resources: when Rutgers University changed its printers’ settings to double-sided, it saved more than seven million sheets of paper in one semester in 2007.

 

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Booming bamboo: The next super-material?

Booming bamboo: The next super-material? | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
Bamboo is now used for construction, textiles and energy production - could this humble grass become a 21st Century super-material?

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Endgame of an Era

Endgame of an Era | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

As a civilization we are in the throes of living out an "endgame." No, not the endgame of our species or any similar dire situation, but the endgame of an era. For many of us living in the developed nations, we are witnessing the endgame of the Second Industrial Revolution. Yet overall, this endgame concerns a way of living, a social-political model that has now come to the end of its life. Simply put, we cannot go on living as we have been for the past 150 years. Why 150 years? Well, this is roughly the time since oil was first discovered and utilized for fueling our rapid social expansion.

 

by Kingsley Dennis, Ph.D.

Sociologist, writer, co-founder of WorldShift International

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Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future

Access to clean, affordable and reliable energy has been a cornerstone of the world's increasing prosperity and economic growth since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Our use of energy in the twenty–first century must also be sustainable. Solar and water–based energy generation, and engineering of microbes to produce biofuels are a few examples of the alternatives. This Perspective puts these opportunities into a larger context by relating them to a number of aspects in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. It also provides a snapshot of the current energy landscape and discusses several research and development opportunities and pathways that could lead to a prosperous, sustainable and secure energy future for the world.

 

Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future

Steven Chu & Arun Majumdar

Nature 488, 294–303 (16 August 2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11475


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How solar power can help the billion people without electricity

How solar power can help the billion people without electricity | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

One of the major opportunities lies in providing energy access for the more than 1.2 billion people who don't have electricity, most of whom, in business-as-usual scenarios, still won't have it in 2030. These are the poorest people on the planet. Ironically, the world's poorest can best afford the most sophisticated lighting — off-grid combinations of solar panels, power electronics, and LED lights. And this creates an opportunity for which the economics are compelling, the moral urgency profound, the development benefits enormous, and the potential leverage game changing.

 

The cost of coal and copper — the ingredients of conventional grid power — are soaring. Meanwhile, the cost of solar panels and LEDs, the ingredients of distributed renewable power, are racing down even faster.

 

If we want the poor to benefit from electricity we cannot wait for the grid, and we cannot rely on fossil fuels. The International Energy Agency, historically a grid-centric, establishment voice, admits that half of those without electricity today will never be wired. The government of India estimates that two-thirds of its non-electrified households need distributed power.

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The end game

"The end game is about to begin. On the one hand you have the noise and rhetoric. Greedy speculators gouging gasoline prices; mad mullahs preparing to wipe Israel off the map; bunker buster bombs and fleets being positioned; huge demand for oil from the BRIC countries; China's insatiable thirst for oil; the oil price will head for $200 a barrel and will never again fall below $130 ...

 

On the other hand you have the reality."

 

by Chris Cook

- Asia Times Online

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The 'Democratization Of Energy' Will Change Everything

The 'Democratization Of Energy' Will Change Everything | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

"The Third Industrial Revolution will move apace over the next several decades, probably peaking around 2050, and plateau in the second half of the 21st century. Already, in the shadow of its ascending bell curve, we can see a new economic era that will take us beyond the industrious mode that characterized the last two centuries of economic development and into a collaborative way of life. The metamorphosis from an industrial to a collaborative revolution represents one of the great turning points in economic history." - Jeremy Rifkin

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