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The Next Edge
Nurturing the Emergence of a Thrivable Future
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Collaboration is the New Competition

Five ways to drive large-scale social change by working cooperatively.
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Leaders and organizations are acknowledging that even their best individual efforts can't stack up against today's complex and interconnected problems. They are putting aside self-interests and collaborating to build a new civic infrastructure to advance their shared objectives. It's called collective impact and it's a growing trend across the country. (...)

While collaboration is certainly not a foreign concept, what we're seeing around the country is the coming together of non-traditional partners, and a willingness to embrace new ways of working together. And, this movement is yielding promising results.

... five lessons for driving large-scale social change through collaboration:


  1. Clearly define what you can do together: As Dana O'Donovan of the Monitor Institute has noted, many organizations find collaboration to be messy and time consuming. From the very beginning, you must develop clarity of purpose and articulate, "What can we do together that we could not do alone?" (...)
  2. Transcend parochialism: Even the most well intended collaboration is often crippled by parochialism. Individual organizations earmark their participation and resources for activities that perfectly align with their own work or they use the collaboration platform as a way to get other participants to fund their own priorities. (...)
  3. Adapt to data: The complex, multidisciplinary problems that many collaborative projects tackle do not have easy fixes. These challenges require continuous learning and innovation and the use of real-time data to help participants understand what is and isn't working. Adjustments must be made on the fly. (...)
  4. Feed the field: You have an obligation to share what you learn — both the results and the methods for achieving them. Living Cities has long understood the value that our member institutions get by learning and working together. (...)
  5. Support the backbone: In our experience, progress is best achieved when a "backbone organization," keeps the group's work moving forward. Staff at these organizations ensure that work is completed between meetings, track data, enable adaptation, disseminate knowledge, and build buy-in and ownership from all participants.(...)

Ben Hecht

Ben Hecht is President & CEO of Living Cities, an organization that harnesses the collective knowledge of its 22 member foundations and financial institutions to benefit low income people and the cities where they live.



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Designing Ecosphere Economies for Planet of Cities

Designing Ecosphere Economies for Planet of Cities | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Integral Cities in different locations must adapt differing solutions to the same infrastructure problems. We need to evolve our internal environments and design our external environments in ways that honour the ecosphere that we are inextricably a part of . Only by doing so can both individual and collective human life optimize the amazing diversity our DNA has gifted us with and the deep resilience of the natural ecology Gaia supports us with.


Via Anne Caspari
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High-tech greenhouse planned for downtown Vancouver parkade rooftop

High-tech greenhouse planned for downtown Vancouver parkade rooftop | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

The roof of a city-owned downtown parkade will be converted to a high-tech vertical growing space capable of producing 95 tonnes of fresh vegetables a year.

Vancouver-based Valcent Products has entered into a memorandum of understanding with EasyPark, the corporate manager of the city’s parkades, to build a 6,000-square-foot greenhouse on underutilized space on the roof of the parkade at 535 Richards Street, in the heart of the downtown core.


Via Lauren Moss, Flemming Funch
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An Ecosystem for Movement

An Ecosystem for Movement | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Snippets:

 

 The great Kevin Kelly recently wrote a post titled “Cities are Immortal, Companies Die.” He states that

 

"Both are types of networks, with different destinies. There are two basic network forms: organisms or ecosystems. Companies are like organisms, while cities are like ecosystems."

 

The fact is that we need both, healthy organisms and a healthy ecosystem where these organisms can thrive. The industrial mindset continues to shape the social sector, and it can be challenging to transcend our organizations – we tend to over-identify with them, and to compete rather than collaborate with natural allies, this can make for an unhealthy ecosystem.

 

shared by Jean Russell @NurtureGirl

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Urban Roots Trailer

Urban Roots is the next documentary from Tree Media. Produced by Leila Conners (The 11th Hour) and Mathew Schmid and directed by Mark MacInnis, the film follows the urban farming phenomenon in Detroit.
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Edible City

Edible City | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Edible City is a 72 minute documentary film that asks a few burning questions…

 

“How can we live in cities and still eat local, healthy, sustainable food?”
“How can we create jobs, build local economies, and increase food security all at the same time?”
“How can we create food systems that are economically, socially, and environmentally just?”

 

Edible City follows ten extraordinary stories exploring what’s going on in the food movement today, from the grassroots growth to the politics in Washington, D.C., from Occupy Oakland to creating community resiliency and local economic infrastructure.

 

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The Interplay Games Experiment — DeepFUN

The Interplay Games Experiment — DeepFUN | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

The kids who had played together, worked better together.


The kids who hadn’t played together spent most of their time defending their pile of junk, and trying to steal or grab junk from the other piles. Even though the materials were purposefully selected to be of the no-apparent-appeal-to-anyone junk variety, they spent more time fighting over the materials than in building with them.

 

The kids who played together eventually built a single city. They started out, dividing themselves into groups around each junk pile, building streets and houses and apartments and playgrounds, and eventually built roadways to collect their cities together into one metropolis.

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How Social Movements Happen, Part II: Hollowing Out, Self-Organization, New Stories, Renaissance - EMERGENT CITIES

How Social Movements Happen, Part II: Hollowing Out, Self-Organization, New Stories, Renaissance - EMERGENT CITIES | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

"The social phenomenon known as evaporative cooling is at work here; with each aesthete’s departure, the mainstream system's level of cluefulness is diminished. Its institutions become hollow: they still maintain a facade and an unchanged internal structure, but quality has left the building and vacuity has taken its place. Whether people still on the inside believe it or not, the system is running on empty."

 

 

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A Legal Strategy for Immediately Creating Private Free Cities

A Legal Strategy for Immediately Creating Private Free Cities | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Freedom is a key element by which people succeed and specialize in what they do best. A violation of this essential value can create serious problems within a society, especially when the government is the principal transgressor. In this video, Kevin Lyons develops a legal strategy for the establishment of free cities, using international law and arbitration techniques as resources, in order to expand options for this social experiment. He also speaks about the possible locations for these cities and explains their internal logic, which focuses on allowing freedom of choice and the free development of individuals.

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Global City Symphony

This is a short demo of the development of Global City Symphony, a future creative learning and knowledge sharing platform in a network of seven cities will allow citizens to creatively express issues affecting their lifes and the future of the...
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