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The Next Edge
Nurturing the Emergence of a Thrivable Future
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What GNH (Gross National Happiness) measures

Gross National Happiness #GNHin  Butan measures: compassion,social sustainable development, fairness of distribution, environmental conservation.

 

They want to be 100% organic & biodynamic. They pledge to be carbon neutral. They also measure material and inmaterial dimension of education and are moving from a monarchy to a democracy. All the hierarchy reports from the point of view of GNH.

 

GNH is Not hippie happiness but: a transformative approach, a non-dual perspective (understading of the oneness of people and land) and a systemic approach (considering all levels of the system). Bottom up and top down. They are also creating a Center to apply GNH.

 

Tho Ha Vinh and Julia Kim on Gross National Happiness (GNH) in Bhutan, at the Presencing Global Forum 2012 in Berlin...


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Owning Our Future: The Emerging Ownership Revolution

Owning Our Future: The Emerging Ownership Revolution | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

As long as businesses are set up to focus exclusively on maximizing financial income for the few, our economy will be locked into endless growth and widening inequality. But now people across the world are experimenting with new forms of ownership, which Kelly calls generative: aimed at creating the conditions for all of life to thrive for many generations to come. These designs may hold the key to the deep transformation our civilization needs.

 

by Marjorie Kelly

Read a 30-page excerpt of the book, including the Foreword by David Korten, Prologue, and first chapter.


Via Christophe CESETTI
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Ferananda's comment, September 14, 2012 9:20 PM
Very important question. I was reading a blog speaking about this topic. Thank you for this link. It comes at the right time.
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Reforest Patagonia

Last December, a devastating man-made fire burned over 43,000 acres in the iconic Torres del Paine National Park. Since then, the Chile-based non-profit initiative, has been working to restore the ecosystem to its former glory. Among other things, they decided to leverage love for social media games into real world action. Through this creative campaign, Reforest Patagonia recently achieved their first 100,000 tree milestone, and is well on its way to the goal of one million planted trees by 2013.


The campaign incorporates social media, GPS technology, and the power of crowdfunding to compel people to get involved with the reforestation effort. The first level of participation is simple: donate $4, and Reforest Patagonia will plant a native-species tree (species: lenga, ñirre, and coigüe) in your name. Donors also receive an official certificate of its authenticity with the tree’s exact GPS coordinates, allowing for the tree to be seen via Google Maps from anywhere in the world.


The second level of participation is for those who want to mobilize their online networks for a bigger impact. Groups can use the “Create Your Own Forest” gaming feature to compete for the highest tree count among organizations in similar categories. There are prizes for groups who successfully “plant” the largest forest.


by Beth Buczynski | earthtechling.com

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Dangerous Narratives and How They Affect You (And Our Planet)

Dangerous Narratives and How They Affect You (And Our Planet) | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
We should be concerned that that unsustainable stories have formed a powerful hegemonic discourse that have legitimized a trajectory to an uninhabitable planet.

Via Flora Moon, David Hodgson
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Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
To feed, employ, and sustain the world, our oceans must first be in good health. It is becoming increasingly clear that humans have a substantial impact on these marine ecosystems, and that these impacts are not just threatening the high-seas, but also the humans that depend on them for their livelihoods and well-being.

The health of our oceans is, therefore, primarily a human concern. But how do we measure the health of something as vast and bewildering as an entire ocean?

For many years, scientists have struggled to find a way to make the concept of ocean health meaningful and measureable. There have been a few breakthroughs but no real solution to allow us to concretely measure if things are getting better or worse and by how much? That is, until now.

Published in last week’s issue of the journal Nature The Ocean Health Index is a groundbreaking tool that allows us to take a look at how we as humans benefit from the big blue. The Index examines social, economic, and ecological factors, scaling both globally and locally to give us an accurate assessment. It finally gives us the baseline we need to measure progress...


Via Lauren Moss
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Empowering Public Wisdom

Empowering Public Wisdom | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

In this book you will find innovative ways to distill the wisdom of ordinary people to better guide public policy.


Beyond elections, public participation, and citizen input, we must find a way to produce wise public policy. In Empowering Public Wisdom, lifelong activist Tom Atlee shows how diverse views can be engaged around public issues in ways that generate a coherent, shared “voice of the people,” infusing the political process with common sense and guiding intelligent decision making.

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Shareable: Crowdfunding Goes Hyper-Local

Shareable: Crowdfunding Goes Hyper-Local | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

There used to be a time when, if you wanted money to create public art, produce your invention, or start a company, you had to appeal to higher authorities. Big banks, wealthy relatives, local governments--they had the green, and we the humble innovators had to prove we were worthy of it.


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Generations and Justice

Generations and Justice | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

There is in the U.S. and most other countries one other increasingly significant marginalized population who I think are worthy of our attention. This group is widely recognized but seldom spoken of in terms of justice, exploitation, marginalization and privilege. That population is the unborn generations of our collective future. The ways we marginalize this population are becoming identified, named and recognized in a new field called "intergenerational justice" or "intergenerational equity". In the process of considering fairness, power and obligation among past, present, and future generations, ethicists in this field have noted that the unsustainable use of resources leads to significant intergenerational inequity.

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Future Money: Breakdown or Breakthrough?

Future Money: Breakdown or Breakthrough? | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

James Robertson has been described as the ‘grandfather of green economics’; he might equally be called the father of Renegade Economics: over the last three decades nobody has been more eloquent or straightforward in their advocacy of a new economic order.

 

Robertson's main focus has been the money system. Many years ago he identified the means by which money is created as the principal culprit in our failure to create a more just and sustainable society. In his new book, Future Money: Breakdown or Breakthrough? he summarises the problems with current monetary arrangements and offers an alternative which could set civilization on a much happier, healthier and long-lived course.


Via David Hodgson, Elle D'Coda
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Welcome to the new reputation economy (Wired UK)

Welcome to the new reputation economy (Wired UK) | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Imagine a world where banks take into account your online reputation alongside traditional credit ratings to determine your loan; where headhunters hire you based on the expertise you've demonstrated on online forums such as Quora; where your status from renting a house through Airbnb helps you become a trusted car renter on WhipCar; where your feedback on eBay can be used to get a head-start selling on Etsy; where traditional business cards are replaced by profiles of your digital trustworthiness, updated in real-time. Where reputation data becomes the window into how we behave, what motivates us, how our peers view us and ultimately whether we can or can't be trusted.


Welcome to the reputation economy, where your online history becomes more powerful than your credit history.


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‘Superorganisations’ – Learning from Nature’s Networks

‘Superorganisations’ – Learning from Nature’s Networks | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Fritjof Capra, in his book ‘The Hidden Connections’ applies aspects of complexity theory, particularly the analysis of networks, to global capitalism and the state of the world; and eloquently argues the case that social systems such as organisations and networks are not just like living systems – they are living systems. The concept and theory of living systems (technically known as autopoiesis) was introduced in 1972 by Chilean biologists Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela.

 

This is a complete version of a ‘long-blog’ written by Al Kennedy on behalf of ‘The Nature of Business’ blog and BCI: Biomimicry for Creative Innovation www.businessinspired...


Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, January 18, 2014 8:57 PM

A look at how to go organic with business models in a tech age...

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 2014 9:01 AM

Learning from Nature’s Networks

pdjmoo's curator insight, December 6, 2014 11:04 PM

YOU ARE INVITED TO FOLLOW MY NEWS AGGREGATES @pdjmoo

 

▶  CLIMATE CHANGE http://www.scoop.it/t/changingplanet

▶  BIODIVERSITY http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life

▶  OUR OCEANS http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us

▶   OUR FOOD http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides

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Announcing: Emerging Leader Labs: A Social Incubator Running on the Gift Economy

Announcing: Emerging Leader Labs: A Social Incubator Running on the Gift Economy | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

The premise is pretty straightforward: There are plenty of passionate, driven people who want to make cool ideas and projects happen. Access to resources (especially, money) is often a large barrier to actualizing them. So why not create physical locations that don’t require money as a chief organizing energy source, where enthusiastic entrepreneurs, artists, designers and other creatives can come together and prototype their dreams?


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Creativity in Poverty - Hindustan Times

Creativity in Poverty - Hindustan Times | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
For more than two decades, Prof. Anil Gupta has scoured India's villages for their hidden innovations.
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Polyeconomy - diverse types of coexisting economic systems

Polyeconomy - diverse types of coexisting economic systems | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

• currencies - They include mainstream currencies like dollar, euro, pound etc. As well as growing number of alternatives like bitcoin, ripple, LETS and more. They have in common creation of virtual artifact and attempting to use it for measuring people perceptions of values.


• barter - In barter people exchange directly without using any virtual artifacts like currencies. In most cases by just looking what each party has to offer and than simple exchanging it.


• timeshare - In timesharing communities people use a natural measurement - time. People consider everyone’s time having same value and don’t make up hourly rates as it often happens in currency based systems.


• shared benefit - Shared benefit systems make an assumption that if we decide to support something with our contributions. We care about outcome of such collective effort. By participating in them we have possibility of choosing how we want to direct certain share of such beneficial outcome. Collectives practicing it can use many various ways of assigning shares of created benefit to individual contributions.


• social karma - Various systems incorporating elements of trust and reputations related to concept of social karma In what we could consider its pure form, for our contributions we only ask for public confirmation of them. This way over time we build up a portfolio which we can later present to others. It can play very well in situations where we support causes which we find beneficial for everyone in general. Also when we want to share something scarce, like a round trip to the moon, we can take advantage of social karma in process of choosing to who we want to offer them.


• free sharing - This system requires no accounting at all. All transactions happen because we want to share and care about each other. As more and more goods we can make abundant it becomes much simpler to freely share them.


Via Christophe CESETTI
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Ferananda's comment, September 14, 2012 9:18 PM
Oh yes...polyeconomy in all levels of wealth. I love the beginning of the website. Can`t wait for more!
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Happy Planet Index

nef's Happy Planet Index is an innovative measure that shows the ecological efficiency with which human well-being is created around the world.


It is the first ever index to combine environmental impact with well-being to measure the environmental efficiency with which country by country, people live long and happy lives.


visit neweconomics.org for more.

also see video re: 21 hr work week.

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Alternative Currencies Grow in Popularity

Alternative Currencies Grow in Popularity | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
Most of us take for granted that those rectangular green slips of paper we keep in our wallets are inviolable: the physical embodiment of value. But alternative forms of money have a long history and appear to be growing in popularity. It's not merely barter or primitive means of exchange like seashells or beads. Beneath the financial radar, in hip U.S. towns or South African townships, in shops, markets and even banks, people throughout the world are exchanging goods and services via thousands of currency types that look nothing like official tender.

 


Via jean lievens, P2P Foundation
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Can Open Source Manufacturing Save Humanity?

Can Open Source Manufacturing Save Humanity? | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

It leverages collaborative “hackerspace” dens and fab labs, while the Social Engineering-Knowledge Database simplifies searching for free open source hardware designs and creating materials lists by organizing them into packages with things like CAD files, assembly instructions, and a bill of materials.


via | Disinformation


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Open Collaboration Encyclopedia

Open Collaboration Encyclopedia | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

A New Cultural Literacy (version 2.3)


We bring with us into the future many ideas from the past about how to build the world, how to relate with each other, how to think, how to create, how to share. Advancements in our understanding of what really works, and works for everyone not just a few - what constitutes sustainability - is rapidly sweeping away long-held certainties. The playing field has had its gravity rules flipped. As a result a new game is emerging.


What if you were told that every traditional model of ownership, hierarchy, economics, politics, organization, education, and evolution you had ever taken for granted could be turned on its head, had been turned on its head, and was now in many cases working better than it did before? We imagine you would say, “Where can I get some?”.


Ed. Alpha Lo and Alden Bevington

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how to hack your culture | networks

how to hack your culture | networks | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Ideas, information, trust, influence, opportunity and other resources move through networks of relationships without necessarily adhering to what the org chart says. Social network analysis tools now allow us to make the invisible visible so that we can be more deliberate in our approach to networks. There are a couple of big opportunities here:


Good ideas often have social origins. Innovation is fueled by the exchange of ideas and perspectives and identities, and the accompanying creative tension. It is in this exchange that we have the opportunity to recombine and synthesize, generating brand new opportunities. By deliberately and proactively building networks we can create more of those valuable intersections.

 


Via Maddie Grant, David Hodgson
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"Csikszentmihalyi's Flow is Good Business(TM)" Leadership Simulaiton - Trailer

"Flow is Good Business(TM)" is an interactive game-based leadership development simulation set in a Californian Winery. The inspiration for the Game is the w...

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Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence

Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Participatory culture writer and book author Henry Jenkins interviews cyberculture pioneer Howard Rheingold (Net Smart, 2012) by asking him to explain some of the concepts that have helped him become a paladin of the  and "new literacies" so essential for survival in the always-on information-world we live in today.


This is part three of a long and in-depth interview (Part 2, Part 1) covering key concepts and ideas as the value of "community" and "networks", the architecture of participation, affinity working spaces, and curation.

Here is a short excerpt of Howard response to a question about curation and its value as both a “fundamental building block” of networked communities and as an important form of participation:


Howard Rheingold: "...at the fundamental level, curation depends on individuals making mindful and informed decisions in a publicly detectable way.


Certainly just clicking on a link, “liking” or “plussing” an item online, adding a tag to a photograph is a lightweight element that can be aggregated in valuable ways (ask Facebook).


But the kind of curation that is already mining the mountains of Internet ore for useful and trustworthy nuggets of knowledge, and the kind that will come in the future, has a strong literacy element.


Curators don’t just add good-looking resources to lists, or add their vote through a link or like, they summarize and contextualize in their own words, explicitly explain why the resource is worthy of attention, choose relevant excerpts, tag thoughtfully, group resources and clearly describe the grouping criteria."


In other words, "curators" are the ones creating the metadata needed to empower our emerging collective intelligence.


Curation Is The Social Choice About What Is Worth Paying Attention To.


Good stuff. In-depth. Insightful. 8/10


Full interview: http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-three.html




Via Robin Good
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Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:20 AM
You're welcome :)

It's interesting interesting that you mention POV and stance, as that is not something I had explicitly articulated for myself, but naturally it must be implicitly true. In that sense, it reminds me (again) that curation forces self-reflection in order to present the content better, and that can only be a good thing.
Liz Renshaw's comment, September 8, 2012 9:57 PM
Agree with posts about curation guiding self reflection. This interview in particular is top value and two of my fav people indeed.
Andrew McRobert's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:43 AM

8. This links a series of three interviews quite lengthy but there is some insightful information for the novice in the digital information age. There is video links within the article, including a great question and answer with Robin Good on curation. The video brings a balance to this inclusion.

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What is the future of storytelling? Immersion, interactivity, integration and impact

What is the future of storytelling? Immersion, interactivity, integration and impact | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
As consumer technology evolves at an ever-quickening pace, opportunities for new forms of storytelling are emerging. Experimentation is all well and good, but what do audiences actually want? To answer this question, research group Latitude has interviewed 158 early adopters and compiled a report that forms the first phase of its The Future of Storytelling project.

 

Unsurprisingly, these early adopters are keen to take advantage of everything that technology has to offer. Their key demands are summarized in Latitude’s report as ‘The 4 I’s': Immersion, Interactivity, Integration and Impact. Essentially, they want to be able to explore a story in greater depth, and have it reach out of the confines of a single medium and play out in ‘the real world’....


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Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future

Access to clean, affordable and reliable energy has been a cornerstone of the world's increasing prosperity and economic growth since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Our use of energy in the twenty–first century must also be sustainable. Solar and water–based energy generation, and engineering of microbes to produce biofuels are a few examples of the alternatives. This Perspective puts these opportunities into a larger context by relating them to a number of aspects in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. It also provides a snapshot of the current energy landscape and discusses several research and development opportunities and pathways that could lead to a prosperous, sustainable and secure energy future for the world.

 

Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future

Steven Chu & Arun Majumdar

Nature 488, 294–303 (16 August 2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11475


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Introducing the Ocean Health Index

Introducing the Ocean Health Index | The Next Edge | Scoop.it
Comparing different parts of the world's oceans, the index weighs whether the human activity there is sustainable or in need of better management.

Via Flora Moon, David Hodgson
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Peer-to-peer production and the coming of the commons

Peer-to-peer production and the coming of the commons | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

Our proposal is that the users of the commons should be commons-friendly enterprise structures and not profit-maximising companies. These ethical companies, whose members are the commoners/contributors themselves, would be organised as global open design companies. These would be linked to networks of small factories that produce on the basis of shared values and could more easily adopt open-book management, open recruiting and open supply lines, ensuring transparency to the whole network, in order to create maximum mutual alignment between participants. This is simply an extension of the existing organisational practices of ‘immaterial commons production’, which combines full transparency of all actions with negotiated coordination. (...)

 

It requires distributed access to physical places for collaboration – co-working centres – as well as the widespread possibility for peer learning. Distributed access to financial capital is a further condition, notably crowd-funding, social lending and distributed, decentralised currencies such as cryptography-based digital money Bitcoin. The spread of these peer to peer forms of funding has already attracted the attention of the Bank of England executive director, Andrew Haldane, who has suggested that peer to peer finance models could sweep away the inefficient retail banks before too long.

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