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Nurturing the Emergence of a Thrivable Future
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A New Fundraising Tool for Permaculture Permaculture Research Institute

A New Fundraising Tool for Permaculture Permaculture Research Institute | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

WeTheTrees provides a multifaceted tool to every permaculturalist, and can be used very creatively to not only raise funds for a project, but also to fundraise for a course, assess the market potential of different ideas, and even to pre-sell products that will be produced with aforementioned fundraised capital, allowing the farmer or eco-social entrepreneur to feel more secure in their undertaking.

 

WeTheTrees can also function as an excellent way for a community to collect money for cooperative endeavors.

 

And furthermore, WeTheTrees allows a wonderful and meaningful way for anyone to be able to contribute to positive change on this planet. Just browsing through the site can be enjoyable, seeing all the interesting projects that other folks are raising money for, and when a person sees one that really excited them, its just a click away to become a contributor.

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The Shared Patterns of Indigenous Culture, Permaculture and Digital Commons

The Shared Patterns of Indigenous Culture, Permaculture and Digital Commons | The Next Edge | Scoop.it

I love the idea of “catchment in webs of trust” – Blais’ idea that extended networks of trust can begin to harness flows of energy within a group of people. The community can then become a generative social infrastructure for all sorts of amazing endeavors.

Blais urges to go even a step further, however, by recognizing that we must somehow “move beyond the logic of commons/enclosed, of free/private” so that the intrinsic dynamics of nature – beyond human control – can have their play.

 

She cites the Six Nations of the Lakota, who suggested in the late 1940s that even the very notion of human rights needs to evolve:

 

- There is a hue and cry for human rights – human rights, they said, for all people. And the indigenous people said: What are the rights of the natural world? Where is the seat for the buffalo or the eagle? Who is representing them here in this forum? Who is speaking for the waters of the earth? Who is speaking for the trees and the forests?

 

One can imagine the commons being the crucible for an enlarged conception of human rights — one that more closely integrates human needs with those of the rest of the bio-physical world.”

 

- Michel Bauwens

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