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10 Questions Great Bosses Regularly Ask Their People

10 Questions Great Bosses Regularly Ask Their People | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Great leaders ask great questions. Too often leaders think they are the smartest person in the room, so they are quick to offer advice, give direction, and share their perspectives on how things should be done. Most leaders do this instinctively, because after all, it's the type of behavior that caused them to rise through the ranks.
Via Ken
Ian Berry's insight:
All great questions
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Ken's curator insight, May 1, 3:06 AM
How to drive thinking and performance in your team!
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Ideas for Work

Ideas for Work | The new world of work | Scoop.it
The altMBA is an intensive, 4-week online workshop designed by Seth Godin for high-performing individuals who want to level up and lead.
Ian Berry's insight:
All 17 are on the money I reckon My favourite "Hard work is far better than busy work"
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15 Leadership Books Every Future Leader Should Read (or anyone actually)

15 Leadership Books Every Future Leader Should Read (or anyone actually) | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Many times I've had people ask me, "In addition to coaching and training, what else can I do to learn more about how to improve myself? How can I learn to be a great leader that propels myself and others towards greater growth and greater opportunities?"

 My answer is simple, read. Read everything you can about successful leaders and the steps that they have taken to achieve peak performance for themselves and their organisations.

 The following is a list, and brief overview, of some of the best books that I have read about leadership.

Via David Hain, Create Wise Leader, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Ian Berry's insight:
What I do is compare recommended reading lists When the same books appear I get them As is this case with this list a few make my lists too http://www.ianberry.biz/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IanBerrysrecommendedreadinglist.pdf
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David Hain's curator insight, June 22, 6:21 AM

If you only have a small bookshelf and a thirst for leadership wisdom, here's a good way to fill it!

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 22, 3:53 PM
A list that includes Viktor Frankl and Man's Search for Meaning is good.
Jerry Busone's curator insight, June 23, 7:46 AM

being honest not all these are what I'd call 21st century reads... lesson is simple read something about our craft and make yourself better . Read my book #offthebenchleadership or another ... but read 

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Are You Solving the Right Problems?

Are You Solving the Right Problems? | The new world of work | Scoop.it
How good is your company at problem solving? Probably quite good, if your managers are like those at the companies I’ve studied. What they struggle with, it turns out, is not solving problems but figuring out what the problems are. In surveys of 106 C-suite executives who represented 91 private and public-sector companies in 17 countries, I found that a full 85% strongly agreed or agreed that their organizations were bad at problem diagnosis, and 87% strongly agreed or agreed that this flaw carried significant costs. Fewer than one in 10 said they were unaffected by the issue. The pattern is clear: Spurred by a penchant for action, managers tend to switch quickly into solution mode without checking whether they really understand the problem.

It has been 40 years since Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Jacob Getzels empirically demonstrated the central role of problem framing in creativity. Thinkers from Albert Einstein to Peter Drucker have emphasized the importance of properly diagnosing your problems. So why do organizations still struggle to get it right

Via David Hain
Ian Berry's insight:
I see three opportunities when solving problems. One is framing as this article suggests The other two are solving the underlying cause and secondly taking the opportunity to innovate. Most problem solving returns the status quo instead of moving to a higher level through innovation
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Nelly Renard's curator insight, June 14, 12:34 PM
It has been 40 years since Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Jacob Getzels empirically demonstrated the central role of problem framing in creativity. Thinkers from Albert Einstein to Peter Drucker have emphasized the importance of properly diagnosing your problems. So why do organizations still struggle to get it right
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 14, 1:41 PM
The example of the "slow elevator" underscores a need to reframe what we think problems are. Putting up a mirror is a different way of understanding the problem, as is staggering lunches to reduce peak demands.

What are different ways to look at how schools operate? Might there be old ways i.e. multi-grade classrooms, community schools, changing times, etc?
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 15, 5:40 AM

Interesting question.  Too often I think the answer is NO!

Rescooped by Ian Berry from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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What is Self-Management? | #Innovation

What is Self-Management? | #Innovation | The new world of work | Scoop.it

Self-Management is an alternative to the traditional, hierarchical method of organizing we see most often in modern organizations. There are a few key ideas that are central to the Self-Management philosophy, namely that:

People are generally happier when they have control over their own life (and work) It doesn't make a lot of sense to give the decision-making authority to the person that furthest (literally) away from the actual work being done.


When you give good people more responsibility, they tend to flourish


The traditional hierarchical model of organizations is not scalable—in fact, it's a recipe for a slow painful death


There's an undeniable link between freedom and economic prosperity in nations around the world—and, further, an undeniable link between lack of freedom and corruption at the national level.

 

The same is true of human organizations in general.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Management

 


Via Gust MEES
Ian Berry's insight:
Worth a read What was once organisation now individual I label in self-leadership so as not to confuse it with 21st century management Search management on my blog for more about this http://blog.ianberry.biz/
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 17, 8:55 AM

Self-Management is an alternative to the traditional, hierarchical method of organizing we see most often in modern organizations. There are a few key ideas that are central to the Self-Management philosophy, namely that:

People are generally happier when they have control over their own life (and work) It doesn't make a lot of sense to give the decision-making authority to the person that furthest (literally) away from the actual work being done.


When you give good people more responsibility, they tend to flourish


The traditional hierarchical model of organizations is not scalable—in fact, it's a recipe for a slow painful death


There's an undeniable link between freedom and economic prosperity in nations around the world—and, further, an undeniable link between lack of freedom and corruption at the national level.

 

The same is true of human organizations in general.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Management

 

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The Global Workforce Is Changing with Millennials in Mind

The Global Workforce Is Changing with Millennials in Mind | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Four years from now, Millennials will make up half of the global workforce. They were raised in different times, and this often leads to misconceptions.
Ian Berry's insight:
The phrase I found interesting in this article Millennials are “hard to manage”. Of course they are. People management is dead and has been for at least 25 years. In my view it should have never been. The so-called father of management Peter Drucker got it right "One does not 'manage' people. The task is to lead people."
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A working class manifesto – Esko Kilpi – Medium

A working class manifesto – Esko Kilpi – Medium | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Post-industrial business is about doing meaningful things with meaningful people in a meaningful way.
Ian Berry's insight:
Love the article Don't love the terms knowledge work or knowledge workers Both smell of the past Human work Meaningful work much better As author says "Post-industrial business is about doing meaningful things with meaningful people in a meaningful way."
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What Gets You Up in the Morning?

What Gets You Up in the Morning? | The new world of work | Scoop.it
What keeps you up at night? It’s a question we’ve heard posed in nearly every panel and senior leader interview conducted in recent years, and as a result, it has become tiresome and rote. But I believe the effect of this query is more pernicious than simply boring — stay awake long enough to think it through, and you’ll recognize its essentially negative nature. The question assumes that leaders are in the habit — indeed, that they have a responsibility — to let worry pervade their every hour, even those precious few required to refresh, balance, and sustain human effort.

That’s why it was bracing to hear the chief economist of a global bank describe how his CEO responded to this question at a recent meeting of senior employees. “I’m sick of that question,” the CEO had said. “Besides, it misses the point. More important is: What makes me leap out of bed in the morning?”

Via David Hain
Ian Berry's insight:
I like the reference to "challenge the process" If stuff is keeping you awake at night and/or you're getting up in the morning not looking forward to the day ahead then respectfully I suggest you must challenge your processes
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David Hain's curator insight, May 30, 11:40 AM

Why do you bother? Maybe the answer is also a key to good OD...

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Do I Have Your Attention? Why Focus is the New I.Q.

Do I Have Your Attention? Why Focus is the New I.Q. | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Enjoy these tips from nine YEC members who use planning, prioritization, and technology to help focus on the tasks that will drive their business forward.
Ian Berry's insight:
Like the concept about focus. One of the best things I've done in the last decade is read and act on the Deep Work book Here's my blog about the book http://blog.ianberry.biz/2017/02/the-3-key-benefits-of-leaving.html
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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | The new world of work | Scoop.it
The new, emerging theory of organizations is this: Every organization has three kinds of power, and three forms of leadership, three structures. This is not a menu. There is no decision to make about having all three structures, or not. None of the three structures is optional, or nice to have. They are part of organizational physics - universal laws that apply to every organization, large or small, old or new, for profit or social.


Via David Hain
Ian Berry's insight:
Agree an excellent article. For value to be created (delivered) people must feel valued and be living values. More on these at http://blog.ianberry.biz/2017/02/for-your-best-business-results-turn.html
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David Hain's curator insight, May 19, 6:52 AM

Very persuasive conceptualisation of leadership levers, from Nils Pflaeging.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 19, 11:33 AM

This is a good step in understanding leadership.  I have always maintained that an organization is held together by a matrix of relationships and this address some of that concept.

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The seven techniques of Learning to Learn

The seven techniques of Learning to Learn | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Learning should not be as hard as you think. There is a method to the art and just like any skill, learning to learn needs practice and mastery. It is much like speed reading. If you know how to read faster, you can end up reading more books in a given time. Similarly, if you learn how to learn efficiently you can spend less time doing the learning and more time enjoying what you have learned.

As a trainer, the topic of learning to learn is even more important since it is not only beneficial to you, but it also helps you to improve your training. As such, it is worth investing time in.

In this article, you will be introduced to seven highly effective techniques that help you maximise learning in a given time. The following methods are presented as if you are applying them to yourself, but you should consider how you can take advantage of them for your learners in a training environment.

Via Edumorfosis
Ian Berry's insight:
Particularly like "Find a Learning PartnerUse Micro-Challenges and Mini-Motivations"
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, May 19, 5:40 AM
Zeven toetsstenen om na te gaan of je in jouw klas leert leren. 
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, May 23, 2:35 PM
A paper published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest evaluated some techniques for improving learning. Be aware that everyone thinks they have their own style of learning (they don't, according to the latest research), and the evidence suggests that just because a technique works or does not work for other people does not necessarily mean it will or won’t work well for you. If you want to know how to revise or learn most effectively you will still want to experiment on yourself a little with each technique. Elaborative Interrogation (Rating = moderate) A method involving creating explanations for why stated facts are true. The method involves concentrating on why questions rather than what questions and creating questions for yourself as you are working through a task. This is a good method because it is simple, so anyone can apply it easily. It does however require enough prior knowledge to enable you to generate good questions for yourself, so this method may be best for learners with experience in a subject. Self Explanation (Rating = moderate) A technique that is useful for abstract learning. The technique involves explaining and recording how one solves or understands problems as they work and giving reasons for choices that are made. This was found to be more effective if done while learning as opposed to after learning. Self explanation has been found to be effective with learners ranging from children in kindergarten to older students working on algebraic formulas and geometric theorems. Like elaborative explanation, self explanation benefits from its simplicity. Summarisation (Rating = low) An old staple, tested by having participants summarise every page of text in to a few short lines. Summarising and note taking were found to be beneficial for preparing for written exams but less useful for types of tests that do not require students to generate information – such as multiple choice tests. Highlighting and underlining (Rating = low) The runaway favourite technique of students was found to perform spectacularly poorly when done on its own under controlled conditions. It seems pretty intuitive that highlighting alone is ineffective for the same reasons it is so popular – it requires no training, it takes practically no additional time and crucially, it involves very little thought above the effort taken to simply read a piece of text. The keyword mnemonic (Rating = low) A technique for memorising information involving linking words to meanings through associations based on how a word sounds and creating imagery for specific words. Much research has found that mnemonics are useful for memorising information in the short term in a range of situations including learning foreign language, learning people’s names and occupations, learning scientific terms etc. However, it seems the keyword mnemonic is only effective in instances where keywords are important and the material includes keywords which are inherently easy to memorise. Imagery for Text Learning (Rating = low) Experiments asking students to simply imagine clear visual images as they are reading texts have found advantages when memorising sentences, but these advantages seem much less pronounced when longer pieces of text are involved. Interestingly, visualisation was found to be more effective when students listened to a text than when they read text themselves, implying the act of reading may make it harder to focus on visualizing. Rereading (Rating = low) Overall, rereading is found to be much less effective than other techniques – however the research has drawn some interesting conclusions. Massed rereading – rereading immediately after reading - has been found more effective than outlining and summarising for the same amount of time. It does seem however, that rereading spaced over a longer amount of time has a much stronger effect than massed rereading. Practice Testing (Rating = High) testing is often seen as a necessary evil of education. practice testing seems to result in benefits. Unlike many of the other techniques mentioned, the benefits of practice testing are not modest – studies have found that a practice test can double free recall! Research has found that though multiple choice testing is indeed effective, practice tests that require more detailed answers to be generated are more effective. Importantly, practice testing is effective when you create the questions yourself. Distributed Practice (Rating = High) if you want to remember something for a year you should study at least every month, if you want to remember something for five years you should space your learning every six to twelve months. If you want to remember something for a week you should space your learning 12-24 hours apart. It does seem however that the distributed-practice effect may work best when processing information deeply – so for best results you might want to try a distributed practice and self-testing combo. 

 So it is clear that we are all expected to be able to learn but currently we don’t ever really get taught how to learn. The trick is to experiment with different methods or techniques and to discover the ideal technique for us according to our needs and the one that suits our learning style, as we know there are techniques that can work for many people but for us they do not work as effectively as We expect it.
Sarah's curator insight, May 24, 6:19 PM
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5 Ways You Can Use Mindfulness To Fix Your Brain, Reduce Stress and Boost Performance

5 Ways You Can Use Mindfulness To Fix Your Brain, Reduce Stress and Boost Performance | The new world of work | Scoop.it
There’s no shortage of advice out there claiming to make you better, but mindfulness meditation is the rare, research-proven technique that boosts

Via Pavel Barta
Ian Berry's insight:
Good suggestions about mindfulness which sadly is a current buzzword Author covers it "Mindfulness is the simple act of focusing all of your attention on the present." Ellen Langer whose book Mindfulness spiked interest over 25 years ago says it's about noticing and in her words "Life consists only of moments, nothing more than that. So if you make the moment matter, it all matters."
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 14, 11:37 AM
There is a research base to understand how mindfulness is helpful. I am reluctant to say it fixes things i.e. the brain. It may slow down the process of brain atrophication, which is a part of aging. I found meditation helped me become more mindful in the classroom and in life more broadly.
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Dialogic OD and Beyond: Towards New Forms of Organisational Change

Dialogic OD and Beyond: Towards New Forms of Organisational Change | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Professor Cliff Oswick (Chair of THIR) presented recently at one our Food for Thought lunchtime talks on the changing forms of Organisational Development. →

Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
Ian Berry's insight:
There's something old, something borrowed, and something new in most success I don't buy into the past, present and future being separate rather an evolution
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 11, 6:02 PM

What do you think?

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Why Warmth Is the Underappreciated Skill Leaders Need

Why Warmth Is the Underappreciated Skill Leaders Need | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Discover how first impressions that focus on both warmth and competence help establish leadership presence, based on faculty research at the Kellogg School.
Ian Berry's insight:
I agree warmth is underappreciated. As machines move in and take the algorithmic jobs they will be done with a cold attitude and warmth along with wit and wisdom will be rare and highly valued
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Be inspired by the early-stage pitch decks of 20 of today’s most innovative companies

Be inspired by the early-stage pitch decks of 20 of today’s most innovative companies | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Take a look at where and how these powerhouse companies started and get inspired to give your ideas the pitching power they need to thrive.
Ian Berry's insight:
Lots of good insights about the new and future world of work I also like the problem/solution model and the plainness of the slides for purpose of pitching. Airbnb my favourite
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All core values have a dark side. Yes, even yours - SmartCompany

It’s been a shambolic few weeks in Uber land. No need to rehash the many missteps and problems that have beset the ride-sharing behemoth, I’m sure people reading are well acquainted with their travails. The task ahead is one I refer to as turning around the Titanic with a paddle. That’s what trying to change …
Ian Berry's insight:
Values can only be lived when there's an agreed 3 - 5 behaviours in place and people are held to account. Just words is inviting the dark side!
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The systems thinking blindspot of Reinventing Organizations fans

The systems thinking blindspot of Reinventing Organizations fans | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Many fans of Reinventing Organizations get too attached to the Teal paradigm. The lesson from systems thinking is to transcend paradigms. When we do this we reach deeper understanding.
Ian Berry's insight:
I'm a big fan of the Reinventing Organisations book. This article demonstrates the trouble that happens when we think our way is the only way or become zealots
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Two Simple Concepts for Thinking about the Future

Two Simple Concepts for Thinking about the Future | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Building a network and improving your imagination can expand the road ahead.
Ian Berry's insight:
I love these two concepts and will be adopting them in my master-mind groups and work with leadership teams
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Eileen Fisher and the Personal Side of Leadership

Eileen Fisher and the Personal Side of Leadership | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Is it fair to ask employees to embrace personal growth, on top of everything else they do? Yes, according to the apparel company CEO.
Ian Berry's insight:
All change is personal first and personal purpose is a key Very insightful 3 minute video
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How to Strengthen Your Team with Intentional and Open Communication

How to Strengthen Your Team with Intentional and Open Communication | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Encourage people to communicate with each other. And, don’t think of intentional communication and open communication as two separate things.
Ian Berry's insight:
The insight "Intentional communication is strategic communication you use to reinforce purpose." is a big one for me as is the silly involvement of finance departments
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A Handful Of Expert Tips To Increase Workplace Productivity

A Handful Of Expert Tips To Increase Workplace Productivity | The new world of work | Scoop.it
How do entrepreneurs, business leaders and the world's most productive companies sustain the highest levels of workplace productivity?
Ian Berry's insight:
Like the first three hours insight. Personally live the "less but better' approach from the book Essentialism and practice "Deep Work" from the book of the same name
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Do We Need Company Values in the Future of Work? – The Ready – Medium

Do We Need Company Values in the Future of Work? – The Ready – Medium | The new world of work | Scoop.it
I’ve been trying to make sense of company values since my first internship in the ’90s. Whether stencilled on walls in the caf, printed on posters in the lobby, or distributed on cards in every…
Ian Berry's insight:
Really like the suggested actions here particularly regarding purpose and recasting values as broad ways of working My own take and work http://blog.ianberry.biz/2017/02/for-your-best-business-results-turn.html
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SCREEN_THE_INT_TOOLKIT_A5.compressed (1).pdf

SCREEN_THE_INT_TOOLKIT_A5.compressed (1).pdf | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Dropbox is a free service that lets you bring your photos, docs, and videos anywhere and share them easily. Never email yourself a file again!
Ian Berry's insight:
Great toolkit for intrapreneurs, entrepreneurs and anyone passionate about the new world of work
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How to Tell If You Have a Fixed or a Growth Mindset [Infographic]

How to Tell If You Have a Fixed or a Growth Mindset [Infographic] | The new world of work | Scoop.it
How do you think? With a fixed mindset, or a growth mindset? Do you believe in limitations or possibilities? Compare the two and see where you fit in!

Via David Ednie
Ian Berry's insight:
A good infographic
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David Ednie's curator insight, May 15, 8:42 AM

Cloud Thinkers have a Digitally Transformed worldview and a Growth Mindset. Having a Fixed Mindset makes you a Prisoner of the Past. 

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EP 18: Seth Godin: On Thin Ice | Elin Barton

EP 18: Seth Godin: On Thin Ice | Elin Barton | The new world of work | Scoop.it
Ian Berry's insight:
Some really great insights here from Seth Godin about authenticity, fear, and how all important work happens on thin ice. Seth's post http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/04/how-thin-is-your-ice.html
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Doing Too Much Could Ruin Your Business. These 8 Exercises Will Help You Focus On What Really Matters

Sometimes less is more. New business owners who try to be all things to all people usually find they can't totally excite anyone.

Via Anita
Ian Berry's insight:
Good sound advice whether you're just starting out or have a well established business
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Anita's curator insight, May 12, 7:00 PM
When you do this, you will likely have to say "yes" to some things and "no" to others.