The New Reality of Work
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The New Reality of Work
The future of work is already here; it’s just not evenly distributed
Curated by Denis Pennel
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The Ego Revolution at Work: A must-Read!

The Ego Revolution at Work: A must-Read! | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it

Entitled “The Ego Revolution at Work”, the new book by Denis Pennel emphases the demise of a dominant work organisation model (Fordism) and the emergence of new forms of work (such as uberisation, human cloud, self-employment,).

 

Today’s labour markets are characterised by the rise of a dispersed workforce and increasing working time flexibility. In this new environment the needs of individuals and business are changing rapidly: companies can no longer offer the security of “a job for life” and individuals want more freedom of choice and expect to work the way they live!

 

The way businesses and individuals think about employment needs to change to accommodate this new working environment. The workplace must be aligned with today’s diverse workforce. Social benefits must become portable to protect individuals’ rights whatever their status, and with these benefits no longer attached to an organisation. Employers must find new ways to attract and retain just-in-time workers and to engage with an extended workforce.

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, January 18, 9:56 AM

Looks very interesting. By Dennis Pennel.

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The future of work is beginning to look increasingly like the past

The future of work is beginning to look increasingly like the past | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
With the rise of the virtual economy, the new ways of working need to be recognised and regulated so that workers are afforded appropriate rights and social protection, writes Denis Pennel.

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, May 19, 3:56 PM

Denis Pennel compares the future of work with the pre-industrialization period of work and there are a lot of similarities.

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How the ever expanding range of job search channels is impacting the recruitment process

How the ever expanding range of job search channels is impacting the recruitment process | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
I am often struck by how much the job search landscape has changed over the past decade. When I started out in my career there were few options: people either applied for a position via the job ads in the newspaper or they went along to their local public employment office and browsed through the vacancies board for something that caught their eye. If they lived in a strong community they might also be able to rely on introductions from family and friends. Today, the picture is quite different. Private employment agencies have grown in numbers and in reach, extending their remit beyond temporary work to include selection full range of HR services to companies and jobseekers. In many countries, the public employment services too have become more service-oriented with job clubs, work centres and increasing public/private cooperation.

However the one single element that has transformed the process of recruitment more than any other is the arrival of the internet. Internet job sites such as resume portals, job forums and job posting sites now abound and other traditional channels like newspaper job ads and public and private employment agencies have also gone online. The result is a virtual labour market operating on a global level.
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History lessons: Understanding the decline in manufacturing

History lessons: Understanding the decline in manufacturing | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it

New ideas for reviving American manufacturing seem to appear every day. Many of these notions have merit, but most are built on a flawed premise: that the decline in U.S. factory jobs is a recent occurrence, one that can be reversed through tax cuts or trade policy. Unfortunately, U.S. industrial decline is a long-run phenomenon and will not be reversed by short-term fixes. Let’s take a look at the trends and their implications.


The really long run Economists traditionally classify economic activity into three sectors: agriculture (including forestry and fishing), industry (including mining, construction, and manufacturing) and services (all activities not included in either agriculture or industry.) You probably have a story in mind about what these data will tell us. The United States was primarily an agricultural economy through the 19th century; then, industry swept the landscape in the late-19th and early 20th century — with America standing as the industrial powerhouse of the world by the 1950s. Things stayed this way until the late-1970s and 1980s, when we first lost our edge to the Japanese, then to the Chinese, and have now become a service economy that doesn’t produce stuff.

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Google has a new division called 'Area 120' where employees can build their own startups

Google has a new division called 'Area 120' where employees can build their own startups | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
Google is creating an in-house startup incubator to help keep its entrepreneurial talent closer to home, according to The Information. The incubator is called “Area 120” and will be headed up by Google executives Don Harrison and Bradley Horowitz, sources told The Information. Here’s how Area 120 will work: First, teams within Google will submit a business plan and apply to join Area 120. If successful, the teams will get to work full-time on their idea for a few months. They’ll then have the opportunity to pitch Google for additional funding and create a new company (which Google will invest in). The name “Area 120” is a reference to Google’s famous “20% time.” Here’s a description of 20% time that Larry Page and Sergey Brin included in their 2004 IPO letter:

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Serving workers in the gig economy

Serving workers in the gig economy | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it

It is difficult to ignore the effects of the "great unbundling" today. The digital revolution has already changed the nature of media, personal health, finance, and other economic and industrial sectors in recent years. As this O’Reilly report reveals, the modern workforce—including the very notion of a "job" itself—is undergoing a similar transformation. Unbundling is the breaking up of traditional packages of goods and services into their component parts, eventually to be rebundled in new ways. In the same fashion, various job components—income, structure, social connections, meaning, and (in the US) access to healthcare—are being unbundled as well.


Authors Nick Grossman and Elizabeth Woyke explore how changes in the workplace bundle are drawing more and more people into the part-time labor force, aka the "gig economy," including traditional freelancers, craftspeople, independent contractors, micro-entrepreneurs, and shift workers. Gig workers now have access to many jobs from many sources, but they also face significant challenges in obtaining security in today’s economy. This report describes how the gig economy is shaping up.

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The need for a Digital New Deal for Workers

The need for a Digital New Deal for Workers | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
As far as jobs are concerned, two spectres are haunting our societies:
-  one that is supposedly destroying jobs, the other that is transforming them: the spectre of automation, i.e. the idea that most jobs will disappear as they are replaced by robots or software, which will throw us all into the oblivion of uselessness and poverty; - the spectre of the gig economy, i.e. the idea that the few remaining jobs won’t be salaried, but rather they will mostly be freelance, thus completing the “great risk shift” that Jacob Hacker wrote about ten years ago. A recent paper by the French Council of Economic Advisers (Conseil d’analyse économique or CAE, of which I am not a member, although I did co-author the paper) sheds light on these two phenomena, drawing the conclusion, however, that they are actually (still) marginal ones.
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The shape of future jobs

The shape of future jobs | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
Between now and 2030, countries all over the world will have to create about 600 million jobs just to absorb the expanding working age population – while simultaneously coping with a number of daunting challenges. Against this backdrop, the World Economic Forum’s Global Council on the Future of Jobs — in which I participate — is launching a survey of 2,000 firms to learn how they anticipate major trends will shape the labor market in their industry by 2020.
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The Digital Revolution Is Making The Job Market Work For You

The Digital Revolution Is Making The Job Market Work For You | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
At the McKinsey Global Institute, we’ve just completed new research looking at the economic growth and employment gains online talent platforms could generate in the decade ahead. By creating better, faster matches between workers and available jobs, they can cut unemployment. By creating flexible part-time opportunities, they can draw more of the inactive population into the labor force. And by putting the right person into the right role, they can boost productivity. All told, online talent platforms could increase global GDP by $2.7 trillion annually by 2025.

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FoW: Competing with Platforms That Ignore the Law

FoW: Competing with Platforms That Ignore the Law | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
As consumers, it’s easy to love the latest generation of tech startups. Uber reliably provides cheaper and more convenient rides. Airbnb is similarly alluring — lower prices for more space than most hotel rooms. Meanwhile, Zenefits modernizes human resources workflows with slick software to replace outdated paper. And Theranos’s advanced medical tests promise to reduce vials of blood draws with tiny thumb-pricks. Who could resist? Look more carefully, and there’s reason to pause. For example, Uber promises to be safest, but its partner drivers and their cars are not subject to the safety rules that govern taxis. Similarly, Airbnb hosts rarely install the protections required at hotels, such as sprinklers and fire escapes. So an Airbnb property may offer one-of-a-kind charm at an affordable price, but could turn into a death trap in the event of a fire.
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Key figures on the Future of Work by the OECD

Key figures on the Future of Work by the OECD | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it

What will the future of work be like in a digital world? Key graphical figures help explain.


Technological change has meant, on the one hand, job losses due to substitution of human labour with machines. On the other hand, technological change also brought direct and indirect job creation as machines require building and maintenance, more wealth is created and new markets are opened. The adoption of technology changes the nature of the tasks entailed by jobs.


Though technological change is typically thought of as automation (the replacement of tasks carried out by humans by machines), it also comprises changes in the efficiency of productive processes (e.g. communication) which can accelerate other large-scale processes affecting employment (e.g. outsourcing, offshoring, globalisation).


The impact of technological change on employment and jobs is biased towards certain types of skills: routine tasks that are easily programmable and non-person-to-person interactions are most affected. Person-to-person services and occupations relying more on creativity, context adaptability, task discretion, social skills and tacit cognitive capacities have been less affected.

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Welcome To The Post-Work Economy

Welcome To The Post-Work Economy | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
f the goal of the economy is to provide decent-paying work for everyone, that economy clearly isn't doing a good job at the moment. Real wages for most Americans haven't increased in 40 years. Real unemployment—which includes the "under-employed"—is above 10%. Many jobs are now part-time, flexi-time, or "gigs" with no benefits and few protections. And, we spend a lot of money to subsidize so-called "bullshit jobs": more than 50% of fast food workers receive some form of public assistance, for instance.
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India likely to employ 2.9 millionn flexi staff by 2018: Report - The Economic Times

India likely to employ 2.9 millionn flexi staff by 2018: Report - The Economic Times | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
India is expected to employ 2.9 million flexi staff by 2018, thereby becoming the third largest country to employ contract employees globally, says a report.
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The future of work is beginning to look increasingly like the past

The future of work is beginning to look increasingly like the past | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it


With the rise of the virtual economy, the new ways of working need to be recognised and regulated so that workers are afforded appropriate rights and social protection, writes Denis Pennel.


In today’s 24/7 demand economy, work is no longer a place to go, but a task to be accomplished. It is not necessarily undertaken by large companies with a sizeable workforce, but is frequently broken down into individual tasks and outsourced to freelancers or informal groupings of individuals, working from home and owning their own production tools (IE laptops and brains). Employers appreciate the advantage of being able to tap into a workforce of independents. It frees them from the hassles of full-time employees and enables them to hire experts when they need them – whether they are skilled workers such as accountants, IT specialists or graphic designers or less skilled workers such as data inputters or cleaners.


From a workers point of view, this approach to work offers many benefits too: the opportunity to be your own boss and take on a range of different tasks and clients; the flexibility to fit in work around other commitments such as hobbies or family; and the chance to work from home and ditch the daily commute.

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Graduate job seeking: The rise of the 'slasher'

Graduate job seeking: The rise of the 'slasher' | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
What is a 'slasher' and could it be the modern career answer to job insecurity? David Lurie explores an emerging career trend among graduates
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How the digital revolution is reshaping the global workforce

How the digital revolution is reshaping the global workforce | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
Back in the 1960s, many thought that the computer and automation would herald less work and more leisure, but the debate has changed. These days, economists debate the extent to which jobs will be lost due to technological innovation. This column explores whether technology is becoming more labour-saving and less job-creating. Concerns over automation causing mass unemployment seem exaggerated, at least for now.
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How Gamification Can Break Down Bureaucracy And Address Real World Problems

How Gamification Can Break Down Bureaucracy And Address Real World Problems | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
The world’s toughest challenges require out-of-the-box thinking. But how can agencies facilitate intentional, structured collaboration that leads to this thinking? Gamification.
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Want a Steady Income? There’s an App for That

Want a Steady Income? There’s an App for That | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it

Income volatility has been called America’s “hidden inequality.” The economists Karen Dynan, Douglas Elmendorf and Daniel Sichel estimated in a Brookings Institution paper that American household incomes became 30 percent more volatile between the early 1970s and the late 2000s, and that in recent years, more than one in 10 American households took in half the annual income that they did the previous year. The Federal Reserve found in 2014 that nearly a third of American households experienced significant income swings. The volatility is hardest, of course, on the poor, who don’t just earn less than the better-­off but also earn their lower incomes more choppily, the money coming in irregular bursts, surging in some weeks, vanishing in others, always making a mockery of plans. Many poor people earn more each year than they spend, but on a given day, they don’t have the cash to handle the expenses due. Payday loans, pawn shops, credit cards, overdraft fees and such fill the vacuum and make things worse, levying a vast toll in interest, fees and stress.


The Federal Reserve study found that the principal cause of income volatility is irregular work hours. Employers increasingly use cutting-­edge scheduling tools like Kronos to calculate the profit-­maximizing head count for every hour and adjust schedules accordingly, week to week or even day to day, sometimes with scarcely any notice. Other factors contribute to growing volatility: the rise of the sharing and freelance economies, and thus the growing ranks of workers making benefits-­free livings as Uber drivers or graphic designers; the absence of paid sick leave, which can turn a single day lost to illness into a financial crisis; the way employers like Staples order employees not to exceed the number of weekly hours that would give them full-­time status and entitle them to benefits; the migration of salaried people to hourly work when hard times bring what the people in suits call “right-­sizing.”

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Recruitment and employment industry key to bringing EU's long-term unemployed into the workplace

Recruitment and employment industry key to bringing EU's long-term unemployed into the workplace | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
Europe’s employment figures have shown an upward trend over the past year. However, there remain vulnerable groups where joblessness continues to be stubbornly high. These include the under-25s, the longer-term unemployed, women returning to the workplace after a career break, migrants and older, less skilled workers. If we are to drive up employment, we need to make labour markets as inclusive as possible. Bringing people into work is good news for everyone.

The employment and recruitment industry is a labour market enabler that delivers all of these benefits. It works with businesses to identify talent, supporting workers in securing jobs and working alongside governments and public employment services to drive labour market efficiency.
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Today, Uncertainty Is The Only Certainty

Today, Uncertainty Is The Only Certainty | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
Shift your mindset to attain the flexibility, work/life balance, variety, job, and life satisfaction you were taught to expect from work.
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, April 12, 5:06 AM

There is no such thing as certainty. Live to it. (via @DennisPennel)

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Internal Labor Markets and the External Competition for Managerial Talent

This paper studies how firms use internal promotions and external hiring to recruit managers. Using matched employer-employee data from Denmark, I document that more productive firms hire more talented trainees, are more likely to promote managers in- ternally, and match with better managers in terms of education and ability. Based on these facts, I develop an assignment model of the market for managers with two-sided heterogeneity. In the model internal labor markets arise from asymmetric learning and firm-specific human capital. Production complementarities between firm productivity and manager talent result in better firms investing in promising workers and in developing tal- ent through firm-specific training and internal promotion. I estimate the model using Danish data

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Organizing for the future of work

Organizing for the future of work | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it

Platform-based talent markets help put the emphasis in human-capital management back where it belongs on humans.


The stage is set for sweeping change as artificial intelligence, after years of hype and debate, brings workplace automation not just to physically intensive roles and repetitive routines but also to a wide range of other tasks. MGI estimates that roughly up to 45 percent of the activities employees perform can be automated by adapting currently demonstrated technologies.

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Workforce Analytics: How mature are organizations?

Workforce Analytics: How mature are organizations? | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
The People Matters Workforce Analytics Study 2016 reveals the analytics maturity level of organizations
Via Andrée Laforge
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Environ 23% des organisations ont un application d'analytique RH en place, cependant, 62% des organisations planifient le faire dans les prochaines années? Et vous, êtes-vous dans le 15% qui ne feront rien?

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Andrée Laforge's curator insight, March 25, 9:36 AM

Environ 23% des organisations ont un application d'analytique RH en place, cependant, 62% des organisations planifient le faire dans les prochaines années? Et vous, êtes-vous dans le 15% qui ne feront rien?

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The future of work: 'Computers are good at the jobs we find hard, and bad at the jobs we find easy'

The future of work: 'Computers are good at the jobs we find hard, and bad at the jobs we find easy' | The New Reality of Work | Scoop.it
The Future of work is coming... But what exactly will this future look like? How will we adapt? And what should we be doing now to prepare for the rise of increasingly intelligent machines? This is very much an emerging area of study, but someone with a fair understanding of it is Michael Priddis, founder and chief executive of a soon-to-be launched artificial intelligence research and development business in Australia. Priddis led Boston Consulting Group Digital Ventures in Asia, and its work designing and building a bank without a branch or call centre helped him to realise that while innovation may improve productivity and efficiency, there are massive social issues at play. Now, with his new business, he says he wants to help governments and businesses plan the way forward. He warns that although technological and scientific developments are exciting, governments and businesses need to consider the unintended consequences and cumulative effect of change, including job losses.
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The Drag and Drop Employee -

I  wanted to introduce a concept which I think is starting to gain more momentum and will continue to do so over the coming years, especially as the freelancer economy continues to grow. It’s this concept of the drag and drop employee. If you have ever used any type of marketing automation software before, you will know that a lot of the functionality is about drag and drop. When you want something to happen you simply drag and drop the action into a sequence. Here’s a screenshot from marketing automation software provider, Infusionsoft, (which I use) so you can see what I’m talking about.


What if this same concept was applied to our organizations. For example, let’s say you were a part of a marketing team and needed some design support and market research assistance. What if you could simply open up a blank canvas like this, search for the right people to fill the job, filter them based on ratings, and then drag and drop them into your project? Then they would automatically be sent all the necessary documents, initial meetings can be scheduled, and within a few hours or a few days you would have the necessary support you needed literally by dragging and dropping team members into a team or project canvas. Better yet, what if a piece of smart software or AI inside of your organization was able to do this for you?

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