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The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice
Enabling citizens to solve problems effectively in the space between Government and the Market Economy.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Can Immigrants Save the Housing Market?

Can Immigrants Save the Housing Market? | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
While some remain cynical about homeownership, the U.S.'s foreign-born population still regards it as a symbol of attaining the American Dream.
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Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State?

Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State? | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Debates over wage-requirements are common at the federal and state level, but now more municipalities are joining the conversation in an attempt to address variations in the cost of living.
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The TRUTH about property developers: how they are exploiting planning authorities and ruining our cities

The TRUTH about property developers: how they are exploiting planning authorities and ruining our cities | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
The power of the policy to leverage affordable housing has been further eroded since the introduction of community infrastructure levy (CIL) in 2010. A non-negotiable fixed-rate tax on new development, CIL was intended to introduce more transparency and give developers a level of certainty about how much they would be expected to contribute towards infrastructural improvements. But, in reality, it has provided another excuse to dodge Section 106 obligations. A further change to the town planning act last year has made Section 106 agreements renegotiable, allowing review and appeal of all existing obligations, in a misguided attempt to promote growth – which simply makes it easier for developers to wriggle out of their promises, as happened in Tottenham and elsewhere.

“Not surprisingly, developers are now even keener to renegotiate the S106 after they’ve got planning permission, finding they can’t negotiate the CIL,” says Peter Rees. “In most cases, they manage to prove that they can no longer afford to pay for the affordable housing that they agreed – it’s simply ‘not viable’ any more.” One planning officer puts it succinctly: “There has never been a worse time to give schemes consent, in terms of securing public benefit.”

In all cases, how developers prove what they can afford to pay for comes down to the dark art of “viability”. The silver bullet of planning applications, the viability appraisal explains, through impenetrable pages of spreadsheets and fastidious appendixes, exactly how a project stacks up financially. It states, in carefully worded sub-clauses, just why it would be impossible for affordable housing to be provided, why the towers must of course be this height, why no ground-floor corner shop or surgery can be included, why workspace is out of the question; indeed, why it is inconceivable for the scheme to be configured in any other form. Presented as a precise science, viability is nothing of the sort; it is a form of bureaucratic alchemy, figures fiddled with spreadsheet spells that can be made to conjure any outcome desired.

Via association concert urbain
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America's Best Performing Cities in 2014

America's Best Performing Cities in 2014 | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it

The knowledge and energy hubs of San Francisco and Texas are among the year’s biggest economic winners.

The top six best performing metros were all tech hubs: The previously mentioned three, plus Provo, Utah; Raleigh-Cary in North Carolina’s Research Triangle; and Salt Lake City. Rounding out the top ten were four Texas cities: Houston, Fort Worth, Dallas and San Antonio. Other tech powerhouses in the top 25 include Seattle at 11 and Boulder at 13.

Energy centers also rank high up the list. This is evident in the strong showing of metros in the Lone Star State, home to seven of the top 25 best performing metros, and five in the top ten. The energy economies of Lafayette (19) and Baton Rouge (21), Louisiana, also place in the top 25 of large metros, the latter of which rose 55 spots in ranking last year alone.


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 14, 11:39 AM

Connectivity is critical.

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Alaska has options to stall fiscal crash, but oil tax rewrite is a must

Alaska has options to stall fiscal crash, but oil tax rewrite is a must | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
OPINION: The first step Alaska needs to take is to begin collecting a fair return for our oil. No other immediate action will have anywhere near the positive impact on our increasingly troubled finances.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. Sliding scale?  More revenue by percent when oil is below $80 a barrel--oil companies can "insure" that eventuality by selling futures at say $110 per barrel when oil trades at $130 (this is how many oil companies are riding this period);

2. Give credits only for new exploration and production and only to the break even point, then tax on the same rate plan as above.

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Supreme Court says it's too early to rule on APOC bias complaint

Supreme Court says it's too early to rule on APOC bias complaint | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Long-running tensions between a high-profile opponent of the proposed Pebble mine and the Alaska Public Offices Commission continue, with a decision Friday by the Alaska Supreme Court to let an administrative challenge run its course.
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Why Alaska's Arctic tundra is slowly sinking

Why Alaska's Arctic tundra is slowly sinking | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Alaska’s tundra landscapes carpet a good portion of the state, from the North Slope to the elbow of the Alaska Peninsula. Researchers say it's slowly sinking in places -- as much as a fifth of an inch each year.
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How Much Fuel We Need To Leave Buried To Beat Climate Change

How Much Fuel We Need To Leave Buried To Beat Climate Change | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
In 2010, United Nations member states agreed to try to hold the planet’s temperatures to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels. It was a goal that acknowledged it w...
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Strange brew

Strange brew | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Bloomin’ algae... ALGAL blooms happen when waste water from farms, factories and dwellings carries large amounts of normally scarce nutrients like nitrogen,...
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French Economist Thomas Piketty Faces Trial by Peers

French Economist Thomas Piketty Faces Trial by Peers | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Gathering in Boston this weekend, academic economists will challenge the author of Capital in the Twenty-First Century
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20 maps that never happened

Maps of countries, infrastructure projects, and invasions that never were — but might have been.
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The minimum wage debate through the eyes of self-made laundromat owner

The minimum wage debate through the eyes of self-made laundromat owner | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Marc Tavakoli has all the classic trappings of success: A law degree from Columbia University, stints at Manhattan law firms, a Beverly Grove penthouse apartment two floors up from a pop singer.
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Requested appeal keeps Hartman case secret under wraps

Requested appeal keeps Hartman case secret under wraps | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — The lawyer representing an inmate fighting to keep past discussions with a public defender secret met a Monday deadline for requesting confidential review of a Superior Court judge’s decision about claimed new evidence in John Hartman’s 1997 murder.
Rob Duke's insight:

Interesting question: how do we decide among these competing rights?

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What to Do With a Dying Neighborhood

What to Do With a Dying Neighborhood | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Covington, Georgia, decided not to let a half-completed development sit empty. But the city's solution has been both praised and vilified by observers.
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Murkowski 'aghast' at rejected suspensions for Stevens prosecutors

Murkowski 'aghast' at rejected suspensions for Stevens prosecutors | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said Thursday that she was “aghast” by a federal personnel board that upheld the appeals of two prosecutors who argued they did not deserve suspensions for the handling of the corruption case against the late Sen. Ted Stevens.
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It's time for Alaskans to grow up and pay our way - but don't bet on it

It's time for Alaskans to grow up and pay our way - but don't bet on it | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
OPINION: Alaska can't keep skating along with fiscal insecurity but don't count on our lawmakers to lead us off the ice.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is both art and science. Tax systems must be like an investment portfolio: diversified.  

-Some property tax to pay for local services, and schools;  

-A small sales tax (.03) to support local government [earmarked separately for general fund (majority %), public safety (even split for fire-EMS & police), and schools];  

-A utility tax (.10) to support public safety in the incorporated areas;

-Parcel fees to support fire services, extra school services, and recreation; and

-Special infrastructure districts to support local streets, roads, sidewalks, bike paths, and neighborhood parks.

 

In other words, tie local expenses as close as possible to local taxes.  These modest taxes will fund basic services and scale up as the community grows.  This also gives communities the freedom to tailor the kinds of services and facilities for which the majority is willing to pay. 

 

For the State:

-A medium sales tax (.02-.03) on services;

-A little bigger sales tax on goods (.03-.04);

-A small income tax (.10)

-Gas tax to support road maintenance

-Toll roads for specialized roads used as transportation between urban population centers and crossroads; and

-a variety of fees to support miscellaneous services.

 

**Value Added Taxes (VAT's) are very efficient also, but misunderstood and, therefore, unpopular.  Given this, I'd recommend something like what's been outlined above.

 

The science part is to connect taxes to the services performed and to the locations where the services are consumed.  In addition, and this is the part that's art, is to spread the taxes out over a variety of economic sectors so that a dramatic drop in one area is still likely to be offset by another sector (or, at the very least not be a catastrophe like we now have with all our eggs in the oil basket).

 

It makes a certain amount of sense to use oil revenue as a capital sink (while also continuing to augment the Permanent Fund) that will replace diminished oil opportunity for new economic investment.  I think we could even afford to take some chances on good ideas--even if some of them don't pan out; or other economies with better competitive advantage buy them out (sometimes there's more to made from patent royalties than from Return on Investment in manufacturing).  Imagine what could happen if we had something like the ANCSA settlement endowments on the scale of the whole State of Alaska rather than several dozen tribal corporations...supporting education, research, and distributed by tax credits and monetary policy, not by central government control, letting the market find efficient outcomes.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, January 14, 10:10 PM

This is both art and science. Tax systems must be like an investment portfolio: diversified.  

-Some property tax to pay for local services, and schools;  

-A small sales tax (.03) to support local government [earmarked separately for general fund (majority %), public safety (even split for fire-EMS & police), and schools];  

-A utility tax (.10) to support public safety in the incorporated areas;

-Parcel fees to support fire services, extra school services, and recreation; and

-Special infrastructure districts to support local streets, roads, sidewalks, bike paths, and neighborhood parks.

 

In other words, tie local expenses as close as possible to local taxes.  These modest taxes will fund basic services and scale up as the community grows.  This also gives communities the freedom to tailor the kinds of services and facilities for which the majority is willing to pay. 

 

For the State:

-A medium sales tax (.02-.03) on services;

-A little bigger sales tax on goods (.03-.04);

-A small income tax (.10)

-Gas tax to support road maintenance

-Toll roads for specialized roads used as transportation between urban population centers and crossroads; and

-a variety of fees to support miscellaneous services.

 

**Value Added Taxes (VAT's) are very efficient also, but misunderstood and, therefore, unpopular.  Given this, I'd recommend something like what's been outlined above.

 

The science part is to connect taxes to the services performed and to the locations where the services are consumed.  In addition, and this is the part that's art, is to spread the taxes out over a variety of economic sectors so that a dramatic drop in one area is still likely to be offset by another sector (or, at the very least not be a catastrophe like we now have with all our eggs in the oil basket).

 

It makes a certain amount of sense to use oil revenue as a capital sink (while also continuing to augment the Permanent Fund) that will replace diminished oil opportunity for new economic investment.  I think we could even afford to take some chances on good ideas--even if some of them don't pan out; or other economies with better competitive advantage buy them out (sometimes there's more to made from patent royalties than from Return on Investment in manufacturing).  Imagine what could happen if we had something like the ANCSA settlement endowments on the scale of the whole State of Alaska rather than several dozen tribal corporations....supporting education, research, and distributed by tax credits and monetary policy, not by central government control, letting the market find efficient outcomes.

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Bill Gates Raises A Glass To (And Of) Water Made From Poop

Bill Gates Raises A Glass To (And Of) Water Made From Poop | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
And he drinks it. It's all thanks to the Janicki Omniprocessor, a new machine that can turn human waste into clean water.
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The Surprising Ways Bankrupt Cities Make Money

The Surprising Ways Bankrupt Cities Make Money | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
When American cities are deep in debt, they get creative to crawl out of the red.
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The world's biggest winners and losers from cheap oil, in one chart

The world's biggest winners and losers from cheap oil, in one chart | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
For most, but certainly not all, countries around the world, cheap oil is a good thing. The Philippines should take a victory lap. Norway may need to run for cover.
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Just 90 Companies Produced Two-Thirds of All Global Warming Emissions Ever

Just 90 Companies Produced Two-Thirds of All Global Warming Emissions Ever | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Who is to blame for climate change? Nearly two-thirds of all man-made global warming emissions from 1751 – 2010 can be traced back to just 90 companies, according to a 2013 report in the journal Climatic Change.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Vending Machines For Shrinking Communities

Vending Machines For Shrinking Communities | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Residents of the picture post card village of Clifton, Derbyshire, have welcomed a new addition to their community: a giant vending machine, or 'electronic shop', as designer Peter Fox prefers to call it.
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The Economics (and Nostalgia) of Dead Malls

The Economics (and Nostalgia) of Dead Malls | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
High-end shopping malls are thriving across the country, but as midtier retailers like Sears and J. C. Penney flounder, they are also dragging down their malls.
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Bush Alaska locked into high gas prices for fuel delivered last summer and fall

Bush Alaska locked into high gas prices for fuel delivered last summer and fall | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
In Bethel, the cheapest gas is $6.67 a gallon at Nicholson’s Auto. In Barrow, unleaded gas is $7 a gallon at Eskimos Inc., the lone gas retailer. In remote villages, gas is even more dear. Filling up an SUV? That’s a quick $125 swipe on your debit card. While urban Alaskans are enjoying a gradual drop in fuel costs, those in rural Alaska continue to pay stinging prices at the pump.
Rob Duke's insight:

Huh?  Why?  It's a commodity that should fluctuate in price wherever it's stored.  If it was the other way around, you know that they'd be raising the price even for gas already in storage.  Price should equal the marginal cost to produce the next unit.

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China’s Silk Road plans could challenge Northern Sea Route

China’s Silk Road plans could challenge Northern Sea Route | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
The ancient route over land -- which also connects the Pacific Ocean to the Baltic Sea -- has certain advantages over the sea route, including elimination of sea-ice problems.. 
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NatGeo Maps on Google

NatGeo Maps on Google | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it

The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888. National Geographic Maps publishes more than 100 new print maps annually and is a leading developer of digital map content found in websites and award-winning mobile apps. All proceeds from the sale and licensing of National Geographic maps go to support the Society's vital exploration, conservation, research and education programs. www.natgeomaps.com


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2014 8:33 PM

Have you ever wanted an archive of all the fabulous maps produced by National Geographic?  And what if you could preview a digital version of all of these NatGeo maps seamlessly on Google Maps?  That is exactly what this gallery delivers.   

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, December 25, 2014 7:03 AM
happy holidays
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, January 1, 9:57 PM

Very US focused but a good source of many maps