Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News
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Car Sharing Widens the Lanes of Access for City Drivers

Car Sharing Widens the Lanes of Access for City Drivers | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
City dwellers are expanding their options for mobility with peer-to-peer car sharing. Can "accessing" replace "ownership" in the love affair with the automobile?
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CNN Host Becomes Irate at Former Navy SEAL for Dismissing Trump-Russia Reports

CNN host Kate Bolduan became irate at former Navy SEAL and Donald Trump supporter Carl Higbie on Tuesday after he dismissed reports that alleged the president shared classified information with Russian diplomats in the Oval Office last week.

Bolduan acknowledged Higbie had dealt with highly classified information in the past and asked if it scared him that Trump would share classified information with top Russian officials.

"I've been sitting here quietly listening to all this BS quite frankly. Did you listen to anything [White House National Security Adviser H.R.] McMaster said today?" Higbie asked Bolduan and the rest of the CNN panel. "Where he said, ‘I was in the room, that didn't happen?'"

Higbie was referring to remarks made by McMaster, who claimed that the president's decision to share sensitive intelligence with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak was "wholly appropriate" to the conversation they were having.
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Exclusive: Sources Say Chris Christie Gave Jared Kushner Legal Advice About Trump

Exclusive: Sources Say Chris Christie Gave Jared Kushner Legal Advice About Trump | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
The two, whose spokespeople deny this claim, used to be adversaries. But the New Jersey governor knows something about being investigated, and the president's son-in-law knows how Christie investigates.
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Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?

Will Donald Trump Be Impeached? | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it

1. The seriousness of the alleged offenses. Does the president’s behavior fall under the constitutional category of “high crimes and misdemeanors?” Have similar behaviors been the basis for impeachment proceedings in the past?
2. The partisanship of pivotal votes in Congress. How much partisanship is there in Congress? Other things held equal, how likely is the decisive 67th senator to vote to remove a president from his own party?
3. The president’s popularity. What are the president’s approval ratings? Does the public think he should be impeached? Has there been a “mandate” delivered by midterm elections or special elections? What do his numbers look like in states and congressional districts where members of Congress are on the fence about how to vote?
4. The president’s relationship with Congress. Does the president generally have good relations with congressional leadership? Is his party’s legislative agenda intact? Does Congress feel as though the balance of power has been upset? Is the president cooperating with investigations into his conduct, or antagonizing Congress instead?
5. Party control of Congress. Which party controls the House and — less importantly for impeachment purposes — the Senate?
6. The line of succession. Who would take over for the president? Do leaders of the president’s party regard the replacement as an acceptable — or even preferable — alternative to the president?

Rob Duke's insight:
According to Nate Silver, there are 6 factors in play...see above.
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Behold! Donald Trump and the mysterious glowing orb.

Behold! Donald Trump and the mysterious glowing orb. | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
The conjuring up of magic and memes became irresistible the moment President Trump, shrouded in darkness, laid hands on a glowing orb in Saudi Arabia.
Rob Duke's insight:
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The activists’ echo-chamber: Labour’s dangerous safe space | The Economist

The activists’ echo-chamber: Labour’s dangerous safe space | The Economist | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
After launching his party’s election manifesto yesterday, Jeremy Corbyn took questions from the press.
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Students Sue Professor for Rubbing Out Pro-Life Chalk Messages

Students Sue Professor for Rubbing Out Pro-Life Chalk Messages | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
“College campuses are not free speech areas. Do you understand? Obviously, you don’t understand," the professor says on video.
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Conventional Wisdom May Be Contaminating Polls

Conventional Wisdom May Be Contaminating Polls | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Sunday’s French presidential election was the latest in a trend.
Rob Duke's insight:
With the Politically Correctness going around in the West--is it possible that people won't reveal their true preferences?
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Aetna Funds Statewide ‘Mental-Health First Aid’ Training For Police Officers

Aetna Funds Statewide ‘Mental-Health First Aid’ Training For Police Officers | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Sgt. Scott Ruszczyk remembers a period of time after the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary when negative emotion ruled his life.
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Around the World in Election Interference

Around the World in Election Interference | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
All politics may be local, but foreigners still like to have their say in their friends’ and adversaries’ elections. Russia’s interference in the U.S. presidential election is the most famous case, but it’s long been popular for countries to put their thumbs on the scale of others’ votes—and for politicians to make strawmen out of the specters of foreign meddling. In several major elections coming up in the next two months, the power of outside parties is playing a big role. Here are four stories of the foreign mixing with the domestic.
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Facebook's Critical Test in France to Fight Fake News

Facebook's Critical Test in France to Fight Fake News | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Will we see a repeat of what happened in the run-up to the U.S. election?
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Huge arsenal seized from high-ranking Pasadena police officer's home, new records show

Huge arsenal seized from high-ranking Pasadena police officer's home, new records show | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it

Federal agents seized about five dozen firearms worth tens of thousands of dollars from a high-ranking Pasadena police officer during a raid this year, according to newly released government records.

The Feb. 16 search of the officer’s Sierra Madre home by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives was widely publicized, but authorities did not identify the officer or detail what was recovered.

The cache of weapons was an enormous haul that took two trucks to cart away.

On Sunday, a federal registry of potential forfeited assets listed 57 firearms that were seized from the home of Lt. Vasken Gourdikian, who most recently served as the Pasadena Police Department’s spokesman and an adjutant to Chief Phillip L. Sanchez.

Rob Duke's insight:
57 guns is a "huge" arsenal? I'm not sure Alaskans would agree. I bought a gun every year and rotated it into my use. It was a matter of parts failure (fire pins, magazine springs, etc.). We'd all heard about officers who broke a firing pin during range qualifying and never knew until the next month when their gun didn't fire, so we all carried two guns and rotated them. When I bought a new gun, I sold the old one so as not to be tempted to carry it. You might be thinking sell a gun after only a year use, but we put 1000 of rounds through our guns every year, so what might be fine for a civilian to carry wouldn't be o.k. for us. I never had more than a shotgun, rifle, and a few handguns (one for home protection, plus a shotgun); one for backup, one for off-duty carry, one for duty carry, one small enough to carry concealed in shorts and sandals. I was conservative in my use of guns and I never saw them as an investment. Some officers saw it as an investment, and others were avid hunters. I was "average" in my gun ownership, but there were many officers who easily had 60 guns. In my mind, unless this officer is buying dozens of guns and never having any legitimate use before reselling them, then they wouldn't want me on any jury they try to get to convict him.
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Analysis | Why CNN can — and did — refuse to air Trump’s new ad targeting ‘fake news’

Analysis | Why CNN can — and did — refuse to air Trump’s new ad targeting ‘fake news’ | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
In a self-congratulatory ad marking his first 100 days in office, President Trump labels major television networks “fake news.” So CNN is refusing to sell the president airtime to show the commercial.

“CNN requested that the advertiser remove the false graphic that the mainstream media is 'fake news,'” the cable channel said in a statement. “The mainstream media is not fake news, and therefore the ad is false and per policy will be accepted only if that graphic is deleted.”

The “fake news” graphic CNN referenced appears over a split-screen showing NBC's Andrea Mitchell, CNN's Wolf Blitzer, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow, ABC's George Stephanopoulos and CBS's Scott Pelley.

The ad was produced by Trump's campaign committee, which remains active; the president already has filed to seek reelection in 2020. The Trump campaign said Monday that it planned to spend $1.5 million to place the commercial on TV and online.

“It is absolutely shameful to see the media blocking the positive message that President Trump is trying to share with the country,” Michael Glassner, the Trump campaign's executive director, said in a statement. “It's clear that CNN is trying to silence our voice and censor our free speech because it doesn't fit their narrative.”
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Why Germany Still Has So Many Middle-Class Manufacturing Jobs

Why Germany Still Has So Many Middle-Class Manufacturing Jobs | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Only about 1.1% of the world population is German. However, 48% of the mid-sized world market leaders come from Germany. These firms, which I call “Hidden Champions,” are part of what makes German economic growth more inclusive: by my calculations, they have created 1.5 million new jobs; have grown by 10% per year on average; and register five times as many patents per employee as large corporations. And they are resilient: my estimate is that in the last 25 years no more than 10% of them disappeared or were taken over, a distinctly lower percentage than for large corporations. Nearly all of them survived the great recession of 2008-2009.

Moreover, Hidden Champions have also contributed to the sustainment of the German manufacturing base, and it is in large part thanks to them that nearly a quarter of the German gross domestic product continues to come from manufacturing. The percentage in most other highly industrialized countries such as the U.S., the UK, or France is only about half of this. The effect on employment is enormous. Manufacturing creates jobs at home and at the time same allows companies, through exports, to participate in the growth of emerging countries.

Drucker Forum 2017: Growth and Inclusive Prosperity
This article is one in a series related to the 9th Global Peter Drucker Forum, taking place in November 2017 in Vienna, Austria.
Given this success, it’s not surprising that many non-German policymakers and economists have looked to the Hidden Champions, or more broadly, the Mittelstand, to try and chart a path to more inclusive growth in their own countries. But how replicable is their success? While other countries could try to emulate aspects of what makes the Hidden Champions so successful, the reasons for their success are the result of a complex network of factors, many of them historical.

A Hidden Champion is defined by three criteria: 1) a company has to be among the top three in the world in its industry, and first on its continent; 2) its revenue must be below €5 billion; and 3) it should be little known to the general public. Germany seems exceptionally good at creating these companies; I have identified 2,734 Hidden Champions worldwide and no less than 1,307 of them are based in Germany. You might argue that my research is deeper in Germany than in other countries, and most likely I wouldn’t be able to prove you wrong. But researchers in other countries have also examined this phenomenon and found far fewer Hidden Champions in their countries. A colleague who looked for Hidden Champions in Japan for years identified only 220 companies, a researcher in France has come up with only 100. With the exception of Switzerland and Austria, the per capita number of Hidden Champions is nowhere near as high as it is in Germany.

Of course, success of individual Hidden Champions is based on their leadership and strategy. The most important difference is the continuity of the leadership. The leaders of the Hidden Champions stay at the helm for an average of 20 years; according to Strategy&, which collects data on the world’s largest 2,500 companies, in large firms the average CEO tenure from 2012 – 2016 was only seven years, and the median was even shorter, at five and a half years. The leaders of Hidden Champions are also more likely to come into power at a young age and are more often women than in larger companies.

But the reasons they are a predominantly German phenomenon are many. This includes the German history of many small independent states (until 1918 Germany consisted of 23 monarchies and three republics), which forced entrepreneurs to internationalize early on in a company’s development if they wanted to keep growing. In addition, there are traditional regional crafts, such as the clock-making industry in the Black Forest with its highly developed fine mechanical competencies, which developed into 450 medical technology companies, most of them makers of surgical instruments.

Scientific competencies also play an important role. The cluster of 39 measurement technology companies in the area of the old university of town of Göttingen are the result of the leading role Göttingen university’s mathematics faculty had for centuries. The Fraunhofer Institute continues to function as a transmission belt between science and practical applications. The Munich-based Hidden Champion Arri, world market leader in professional film cameras, used the expertise of Fraunhofer to navigate the transition from analog to digital technology, and was thus able to defend its leading market position.

A further pillar of the Hidden Champions’ competitive strength is the unique German dual system of apprenticeship, which combines practical and theoretical training in non-academic trades. The Hidden Champions invest 50% more in vocational training than the average German company.

Tax advantages are another reason. The high taxes on assets in France and the inheritance tax in the U.S. prevent the accumulation of capital necessary for the formation of a strong mid-sized sector.

Finally, the international openness of a society is an essential factor in the globalized world of the future. Germany is far ahead of other large countries with regard to mental internationalization. This includes language competencies, international experience from student exchanges, and university studies. Countries such as France, Italy, Japan, and Korea lag far behind in these respects.

Why is this mental internationalization so important? Because while Hidden Champions may be small, they compete on a global scale. They achieve world-class quality by keeping their focus narrow; focus is the most important element of a Hidden Champion’s strategy. Flexi, for example, makes only one product — retractable dog leashes — but has the claim to make them better than anyone else. This has allowed them to reach 70% of market share in this category. But focus makes a market small. How can you make it bigger? By globalizing. Today, the Hidden Champions are present in their target markets with 30 subsidiaries on average. Despite their medium or small size, they are true global players. About one quarter of German exports comes from the Hidden Champions.

I do think the Hidden Champions provide a model of inclusive growth that are worth emulating. But any foreign policymaker or economist seeking to foster a community of such companies in their own country should tailor their approach to that country’s own unique conditions.
Rob Duke's insight:
Some food for thought when we think about policy change....
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Hillary Clinton's 'email' problem was bigger than anyone realized

Hillary Clinton's 'email' problem was bigger than anyone realized | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it

Hillary Clinton's ongoing struggle to deal with the revelation that she used a private email server during her time as secretary of state dominated the conversation about her presidential candidacy, and research suggests it might have doomed her campaign, according to a new study by a consortium of pollsters released over the weekend.

In the paper, presented at the American Association for Public Opinion Research's annual conference in New Orleans, pollsters and political scientists from Gallup, Georgetown University and the University of Michigan studied the daily Gallup tracking poll from July 10 to November 7, 2016. In particular, they zeroed in on one question: "Have you read, seen or heard anything about (Hillary Clinton/Donald Trump) in the last day or two?" They then zeroed in on the "yes" responses and categorized what, exactly, people said they had read, seen or heard.
Here's what people had read, seen or heard about Clinton looks like in a word cloud (the bigger the word, the more often it was mentioned):

As you can see, "email" drowns out every other term mentioned about Clinton. It was, without question, the dominant narrative of the election for her -- at least in the five months that this paper documents. And, according to the study, the mentions of email correlate directly to negative views of Clinton.
Now, check out Trump's word cloud:

There's nothing to match the Clinton "email" mentions. And although some of the most commonly mentioned words are negative storylines for Trump -- "women," most notably -- there's a lot of more neutral mentions: "debate," "people" and "president." This speaks to the theory that by throwing so many balls up in the air every day -- via his stump speeches, Twitter, etc. -- Trump made it impossible for anyone to follow all of them. Everything seemed like a molehill. Even the mountains.

What's more, the word "email" came up more and more in the final weeks of the election -- particularly in the wake of then-FBI Director James Comey's announcement in late October that he was re-starting an investigation into Clinton's server.
RELATED: Hillary Clinton blames James Comey for her loss. Why not blame Anthony Weiner?
Here's the word clouds broken into a week-by-week timeline of the last month of the campaign. Again, the larger the word appears, the more it was mentioned as something people had seen, read or heard about Clinton or Trump.

Not only did "email" dominate the conversation around Clinton, it dominated the entire conversation in the race. From October 23 on, Trump is barely talked about -- an amazing feat for someone so willing to make news.

This study will be used by liberals as evidence that the media's unnecessary focus on Clinton's email server cost her the election.
I'd agree that Clinton's email server played a decisive role in deciding the election. But I wouldn't agree with the idea that the media is responsible for it.
After all, it was Clinton who never seemed to grasp the seriousness of the issue and how it eroded the public's already shaky confidence in her. Her inability to do those things meant she was never able to put the story behind her. And then the Comey announcement came, which undoubtedly surged the issue back to the top of many voters' minds.
Whatever the reasons, when people thought of Clinton in the final weeks of the race, they thought of her emails. And that was a very bad thing for her.

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The President Just Told a Room of Israelis That He "Just Got Back From the Middle East"

The President Just Told a Room of Israelis That He "Just Got Back From the Middle East" | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Duh.
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After Immigration Officer Was Forced From Classroom, Students Lament a Missed Opportunity

After Immigration Officer Was Forced From Classroom, Students Lament a Missed Opportunity | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Protesters shut down an official’s lecture at Northwestern University, leaving the professor and students upset they didn’t get a chance to engage and learn.
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Public Enemy Number 1: George Soros runs the gauntlet | The Economist

Public Enemy Number 1: George Soros runs the gauntlet | The Economist | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it

IN “MASQUERADE”, Tivadar Soros’s memoir of Nazi-occupied Budapest, he describes how he procured false IDs for fellow Jews, including his 14-year-old son George. The elder Soros’s approach to the forgeries is enlightening. With wealthy clients, he “asked for whatever the market would bear”. From the desperate he made nothing: “I felt that I was just a little responsible for everyone.” George posed as the godson of an official who conducted inventories of confiscated Jewish estates. “Without risks,” his father says of a time when each day was a life-or-death gamble, “there’s no life.”

An appetite for risk made George Soros a billionaire, but also made him enemies, as has his congenital philanthropy. In recent months these resentments have reached a new, alarming pitch. Two strands of criticism, in America and abroad, seem to have fused, a confluence epitomised by a pair of obscure letters sent by Republican politicians. A group of senators wrote to Rex Tillerson, the secretary of state, and a clutch of congressmen to the comptroller-general, taking aim at the same detail: the role of USAID, America’s foreign-aid agency, in Macedonia, specifically its collaboration with the local arm of Mr Soros’s Open Society Foundations (OSF).


Mr Soros has supported democratic reform in central and eastern Europe since he distributed photocopiers among activists in the 1980s. His programmes avowedly promote free media, fair elections and clean government, rather than opposition parties, but local autocrats often miss the distinction. The Kremlin, which blamed Mr Soros for peaceful uprisings in Russia’s ex-Soviet neighbours in the 2000s, kicked his affiliate out in 2015. Belarus and Uzbekistan have also given him the push.

A name to conjure with

As Russia revives its influence in Europe, antipathy to Mr Soros is redoubling: in Romania, Poland and especially Macedonia, where, amid a political crisis and allegations of graft and vote-rigging against a former prime minister, a “Stop Operation Soros” movement was launched. Meanwhile Viktor Orban—prime minister of Mr Soros’s native Hungary and himself a recipient of a Soros-funded scholarship—reviles his benefactor’s “transnational empire”. Hungary’s parliament passed a law that might close Central European University, which was founded by Mr Soros in 1991. Another pending law could be used against his foundation.

His political views and hefty donations have led to vitriol in America as well. Denunciations of George W. Bush and the Iraq war made him a bogeyman among right-wing fulminators and conspiracy theorists. His support for Hillary Clinton and disparagement of Donald Trump—an “impostor” and “would-be dictator”—have reinvigorated his assailants. Recently he has developed a controversial sideline in local prosecutorial races, from Louisiana to Illinois, betting that reformist prosecutors can help change the criminal-justice system. Sometimes the candidates he backs seem as baffled by his interest as their rivals, but 12 out of his 15 picks have won.

Still, even if they disliked his influence at home, mainstream American politicians of both parties have mostly endorsed his foreign goals. Now the distinction is crumbling, as the Macedonian letter shows. It is a bizarre intervention: American politicians are in effect aligning themselves with a far-away, scandal-plagued party that is also backed by Russia, and which has allies who have resorted to violence, while disparaging their own government and, of course, Mr Soros. They have got their facts wrong, too: USAID has never funded Mr Soros’s outfit in neighbouring Albania, as the senators alleged. In the scheme of the agency’s budget and the Foundations’, the sums involved are tiny.

In any case, Mr Soros’s infamy from the bayous to the Balkans is odd. He is certainly no saint. Some of his wealth comes from currency speculation, as when, short-selling the pound in 1992, he “broke the Bank of England”. He has a French conviction for insider trading in 1988. Yet he has given billions to worthy causes. Michael Vachon, a longtime adviser, points out that Mr Soros derives no personal benefit from his advocacy of, say, the rights of Roma or the abolition of the death penalty. In politics, Mr Vachon says, unlike many big-time donors he “is always lobbying for a public purpose, never for private gain”. Often he promotes policies, as on tax, that could cost him.

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The James Comey memo is an existential threat to Donald Trump's presidency

The James Comey memo is an existential threat to Donald Trump's presidency | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
The reporting coming out of The New York Times and CNN is explosive: Deposed FBI Director James Comey wrote a memo following a February 14 meeting with Donald Trump in which he says the President told him "I hope you can let this go" in regard to fired aide Michael Flynn's role in the ongoing investigation into Russia's efforts to influence the 2016 campaign.
Rob Duke's insight:
Note to CNN: expressing a hope about the outcome of the investigation isn't "the definition" of obstruction of justice.  In case you need any help finding the actual definition:

First, common law:
Generally, obstruction charges are laid when it is discovered that a person questioned in an investigation, other than a suspect, has lied to the investigating officers. However, in most common law jurisdictions, the right to remain silent can be used to allow any person questioned by police merely to deny answering questions posed by an investigator without giving any reason for doing so. (In such a case, the investigators may subpoena the witness to give testimony under oath in court, though the witness may then exercise their rights, for example in the Fifth Amendment, if they believe their answer may serve to incriminate themselves.) If the person willfully and knowingly tried to protect a suspect (such as by providing a false alibi) or to hide from investigation of their own activities (such as to hide their involvement in another crime), this may leave them liable to prosecution. Obstruction charges can also be laid if a person alters, destroys, or conceals physical evidence.[1] Obstruction charges may also be laid in unique situations such as refusal to aid a police officer, escape through voluntary action of an officer and refusing to assist prison officers in arresting escaped convicts.

Second, Federal Law:

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Alameda Sheriff Deputy's Arrest of Street Fruit Vendor Goes Viral and Draws Criticism | East Bay Express

Alameda Sheriff Deputy's Arrest of Street Fruit Vendor Goes Viral and Draws Criticism |     East Bay Express | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
The sheriff's office responded to these criticism in a lengthy Facebook post last night: "Some people have used this photo as an opportunity to criticize law enforcement and drive a wedge between us and our immigrant, minority and low income communities," the post states. "Sometimes photos can be deceptive," the sheriff's office continued.
Rob Duke's insight:
Even if the officer was enforcing a city ordinance, the stop and arrest is justified.  This is a community's police power to control how people engage in commerce.  Yeah, we know that the underground economy is going to happen, so we mostly ignore this stuff, but not when someone complains.  That can be because they're grumpy, or because of latent racism, but often it underlies some legitimate complaint such as: causes a traffic problem during school time....it restricts the whole sidewalk...it's noisy and he does it right by my bedroom when I'm trying to sleep.   Other times it can be because the legitimate local market feels like it's unfair competition: he doesn't pay rent, business license, or taxes and sells his wares for half what I can afford to sell for....this means I lose business and "good will" because my customers think I'm gouging them when I'm not.
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Huma Abedin Did Not Send As Many Emails As FBI Director Said

Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin didn't forward as many emails as FBI director James Comey said, according to an AP source.
Rob Duke's insight:
CNN reported this as a headline: Comey Makes Big Mistake; whereas AP took a more reserved tone.
This is, thus far, opinion from the Clinton camp....
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Can mythbusters like Snopes.com keep up in a post-truth era?

Can mythbusters like Snopes.com keep up in a post-truth era? | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Mikkelson owns and runs Snopes.com, a hugely popular fact-checking site which debunks urban legends, old wives’ tales, fake news, shoddy journalism and political spin. It started as a hobby in the internet’s Pleistocene epoch two decades ago and evolved into a professional site that millions now rely on as a lie-detector. Every day its team of writers and editors interrogate claims ricocheting around the internet to determine if they are false, true or somewhere in the middle – a cleaning of the Augean stables for the digital era.
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First female White House chief usher fired, sources say

She was first hired by President Barack Obama in 2011.
Rob Duke's insight:
No mention that President Obama dismissed the Chief Usher appointed by President George W. Bush (Stephen Rochon, 2007-2011)....
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Fewer People Are Getting Degrees in Public Service

Fewer People Are Getting Degrees in Public Service | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it

Whether it’s anti-government rhetoric or budgetary uncertainty hanging over public agencies, one can understand why recent graduates have been a little timid about jumping into public-sector careers.

The latest data from the U.S. Department of Education shows that several of the top government-related academic fields -- including criminal justice, political science and public administration -- have seen the number of degrees awarded level off or dip slightly over the past few years. This signals a departure from the previous several decades, including the immediate post-recession period, when schools handed out more diplomas in most fields as workers sought to enhance their résumé  during the economic slump. Degrees awarded for many public-sector professions have since plateaued or declined slightly. What’s hard to say is whether it’s a temporary adjustment or a longer-term trend.

Nationally, degrees awarded for all fields rose sharply over the past several decades, but they too have slowed recently. Since the 2012-2013 school year, total bachelor’s and master’s degree completions have increased only about 2 percent. That’s still somewhat better than many public service-related degrees.

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The lies we were told about who would silence free speech

The lies we were told about who would silence free speech | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
The lie we were told as kids was this: The end of American liberty would come at the hands of the political right.
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Cops change their story after an officer kills a teen outside a party

Cops change their story after an officer kills a teen outside a party | Moral Panics, Rent-Seeking Behavior & Fake News | Scoop.it
Police in a Dallas suburb have changed their story on the circumstances surrounding the fatal shooting of a teenager outside a house party over the weekend.
Rob Duke's insight:
CNN, as usual, spinning a story to meet their own political goals.  As the initial investigation began, of course, the Chief gives his officers the benefit of the doubt until the investigation proves otherwise.  That's all that happened here.  Frankly, the Chief shouldn't be making this statement now, either, it's way too early to make judgement--if the Chief is going to remain the final authority on what happens to the officers after the investigation.  Otherwise, it shows that his judgement may have been compromised beforehand.
Often Chiefs are fired after these incidents, thus the chief may be trying to do damage control.  In my experience, that never helps.  By the time a shooting happens, it's usually too late to build the sort of relationships that can allow a chief to survive the political fall out of an unjustified killing by an officer.
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