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The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice
Enabling citizens to solve problems effectively in the space between Government and the Market Economy.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Conoco: No Moose’s Tooth project unless BLM folds

Conoco: No Moose’s Tooth project unless BLM folds | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
The oil company says it would not develop Greater Moose's Tooth Unit 1, a project in the vast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, if the federal land agency doesn't approve the road and infrastructure plan the company prefers and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers approved.
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Lawmakers push back on mega-project order

Lawmakers push back on mega-project order | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
In the first public hearing since Gov. Bill Walker ordered discretionary work on six mega-projects stopped, legislators questioned just how big the savings would be from stopping work.
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Obama issues executive order to better coordinate Arctic policy

Obama issues executive order to better coordinate Arctic policy | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
As the U.S. approaches its chairmanship of th Arctic Council and far-north climate warming continues at twice the global rate, President Obama issued an executive order Wednesday addressing federal Arctic policy. But Sen. Lisa Murkowski expressed doubts about the order's effectiveness.
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Why Fairbanks gas prices don't adjust along with Lower 48 prices

FAIRBANKS — Plummeting gasoline prices have made visits to the pump much more tolerable in the past six months, but Fairbanks motorists don’t have it quite as good as their counterparts in the Lower 48.
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Alaska Gov. Walker: 'We will build a pipeline'

Alaska Gov. Walker: 'We will build a pipeline' | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Following Gov. Bill Walker’s first State of the State address, Alaskans know a little more about what their new governor’s agenda will be, but only a little.
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7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free

7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Urban planners are finally recognizing that streets should be designed for people, not careening hunks of deadly metal.

After over a hundred years of living with cars, some cities are slowly starting to realize that the automobile doesn't make a lot of sense in the urban context. It isn't just the smog or the traffic deaths; in a city, cars aren't even a convenient way to get around.

Now a growing number of cities are getting rid of cars in certain neighborhoods through fines, better design, new apps, and, in the case of Milan, even paying commuters to leave their car parked at home and take the train instead.

Unsurprisingly, the changes are happening fastest in European capitals that were designed hundreds or thousands of years before cars were ever built. In sprawling U.S. suburbs that were designed for driving, the path to eliminating cars is obviously more challenging.

Read further for more on the leaders moving toward car-free neighborhoods.


Via Lauren Moss
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Emlyn Davies-Cole's curator insight, January 21, 10:25 PM

This knowledge is not new, Architects, Urban designers, City planners, and Government officials have know of this but it has not been put to practice until now. Cities are meant to be populated with people and not dominated by four wheel vehicles.

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We're destroying the planet in ways that are even worse than global warming

We're destroying the planet in ways that are even worse than global warming | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
4 ways humans are endangering life on Earth
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HOT AIR: Scientists Say NOAA/NASA Fudging The Facts On 2014 Record Warmth

HOT AIR: Scientists Say NOAA/NASA Fudging The Facts On 2014 Record Warmth | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Some climate scientists are criticizing government climate agencies for declaring 2014 the warmest year ever recorded, despite reports that government scientists were only 38-48 percent sure that 201
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Will Des Moines water lawsuit change farming rules?

Will Des Moines water lawsuit change farming rules? | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Water lawsuit's reach could be wide, but it's uncertain how it will play out across U.S.

Via Alan Yoshioka, Jocelyn Stoller
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Alaska's fiscal perfect storm

Alaska's fiscal perfect storm | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Alaska depends on oil tax revenue from development on state lands to fund much of state government. Oil prices are volatile, and Alaska’s economy has survived ups and downs, but with no state income or sales tax and little will to tap the $52 billion Permanent Fund, oil dictates most everything in Alaska.
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What to Do With a Dying Neighborhood

What to Do With a Dying Neighborhood | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Covington, Georgia, decided not to let a half-completed development sit empty. But the city's solution has been both praised and vilified by observers.
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Murkowski 'aghast' at rejected suspensions for Stevens prosecutors

Murkowski 'aghast' at rejected suspensions for Stevens prosecutors | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said Thursday that she was “aghast” by a federal personnel board that upheld the appeals of two prosecutors who argued they did not deserve suspensions for the handling of the corruption case against the late Sen. Ted Stevens.
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It's time for Alaskans to grow up and pay our way - but don't bet on it

It's time for Alaskans to grow up and pay our way - but don't bet on it | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
OPINION: Alaska can't keep skating along with fiscal insecurity but don't count on our lawmakers to lead us off the ice.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is both art and science. Tax systems must be like an investment portfolio: diversified.  

-Some property tax to pay for local services, and schools;  

-A small sales tax (.03) to support local government [earmarked separately for general fund (majority %), public safety (even split for fire-EMS & police), and schools];  

-A utility tax (.10) to support public safety in the incorporated areas;

-Parcel fees to support fire services, extra school services, and recreation; and

-Special infrastructure districts to support local streets, roads, sidewalks, bike paths, and neighborhood parks.

 

In other words, tie local expenses as close as possible to local taxes.  These modest taxes will fund basic services and scale up as the community grows.  This also gives communities the freedom to tailor the kinds of services and facilities for which the majority is willing to pay. 

 

For the State:

-A medium sales tax (.02-.03) on services;

-A little bigger sales tax on goods (.03-.04);

-A small income tax (.10)

-Gas tax to support road maintenance

-Toll roads for specialized roads used as transportation between urban population centers and crossroads; and

-a variety of fees to support miscellaneous services.

 

**Value Added Taxes (VAT's) are very efficient also, but misunderstood and, therefore, unpopular.  Given this, I'd recommend something like what's been outlined above.

 

The science part is to connect taxes to the services performed and to the locations where the services are consumed.  In addition, and this is the part that's art, is to spread the taxes out over a variety of economic sectors so that a dramatic drop in one area is still likely to be offset by another sector (or, at the very least not be a catastrophe like we now have with all our eggs in the oil basket).

 

It makes a certain amount of sense to use oil revenue as a capital sink (while also continuing to augment the Permanent Fund) that will replace diminished oil opportunity for new economic investment.  I think we could even afford to take some chances on good ideas--even if some of them don't pan out; or other economies with better competitive advantage buy them out (sometimes there's more to made from patent royalties than from Return on Investment in manufacturing).  Imagine what could happen if we had something like the ANCSA settlement endowments on the scale of the whole State of Alaska rather than several dozen tribal corporations...supporting education, research, and distributed by tax credits and monetary policy, not by central government control, letting the market find efficient outcomes.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, January 14, 10:10 PM

This is both art and science. Tax systems must be like an investment portfolio: diversified.  

-Some property tax to pay for local services, and schools;  

-A small sales tax (.03) to support local government [earmarked separately for general fund (majority %), public safety (even split for fire-EMS & police), and schools];  

-A utility tax (.10) to support public safety in the incorporated areas;

-Parcel fees to support fire services, extra school services, and recreation; and

-Special infrastructure districts to support local streets, roads, sidewalks, bike paths, and neighborhood parks.

 

In other words, tie local expenses as close as possible to local taxes.  These modest taxes will fund basic services and scale up as the community grows.  This also gives communities the freedom to tailor the kinds of services and facilities for which the majority is willing to pay. 

 

For the State:

-A medium sales tax (.02-.03) on services;

-A little bigger sales tax on goods (.03-.04);

-A small income tax (.10)

-Gas tax to support road maintenance

-Toll roads for specialized roads used as transportation between urban population centers and crossroads; and

-a variety of fees to support miscellaneous services.

 

**Value Added Taxes (VAT's) are very efficient also, but misunderstood and, therefore, unpopular.  Given this, I'd recommend something like what's been outlined above.

 

The science part is to connect taxes to the services performed and to the locations where the services are consumed.  In addition, and this is the part that's art, is to spread the taxes out over a variety of economic sectors so that a dramatic drop in one area is still likely to be offset by another sector (or, at the very least not be a catastrophe like we now have with all our eggs in the oil basket).

 

It makes a certain amount of sense to use oil revenue as a capital sink (while also continuing to augment the Permanent Fund) that will replace diminished oil opportunity for new economic investment.  I think we could even afford to take some chances on good ideas--even if some of them don't pan out; or other economies with better competitive advantage buy them out (sometimes there's more to made from patent royalties than from Return on Investment in manufacturing).  Imagine what could happen if we had something like the ANCSA settlement endowments on the scale of the whole State of Alaska rather than several dozen tribal corporations....supporting education, research, and distributed by tax credits and monetary policy, not by central government control, letting the market find efficient outcomes.

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Planes, Trains And Taxis: When To Take Public Transit From The Airport

Planes, Trains And Taxis: When To Take Public Transit From The Airport | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
You can’t spell “New York City’s LaGuardia Airport” without C-A-B. Er … actually you can. But for many New Yorkers, a journey to LaGuardia and a taxi ride are synonymous. There’s no train or subway...
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Six Weeks’ Paid Leave Opposed By People With Thirty-Three Weeks’ Paid Leave - The New Yorker

Six Weeks’ Paid Leave Opposed By People With Thirty-Three Weeks’ Paid Leave - The New Yorker | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Opponents heard the President’s proposal on Tuesday night, one of the few nights of the year when they are required to report to their workplace.
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Of slots and sloth

Of slots and sloth | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
The curse of easy money ON A rainy weekday afternoon, Mike Justice pushes his two-year-old son in a pram up a hill on the Siletz Reservation, a desolate, wooded area...
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Portraits of the World's Tribes - Before they Fade Away

Portraits of the World's Tribes - Before they Fade Away | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
In 2009, photographer Jimmy Nelson set out on a journey to document the ‘world’s last indigenous cultures’. He took a series of photographs featuring 31 of

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Thermos-Like Passive Homes Aggressively Save Energy

Thermos-Like Passive Homes Aggressively Save Energy | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
The passive-building standard is catching on in North America, but it also faces challenges.
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City looks at new 'infrastructure district' to fund L.A. River plans

City looks at new 'infrastructure district' to fund L.A. River plans | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Los Angeles leaders are hoping to use a new tax-sharing law to help finance ambitious plans to transform the city's namesake river into a ribbon of recreational areas and vibrant new developments.
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This House Might Be Small, But Wait Until You See Inside. It's Spectacular.

This House Might Be Small, But Wait Until You See Inside. It's Spectacular. | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
This really is a case of "less is more".
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Paul Jenkins: Walker makes a mess of conflict question

Paul Jenkins: Walker makes a mess of conflict question | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
OPINION: The apparent conflicts of Gov. Bill Walker and his attorney general involving oil and gas litigation need a better resolution than what the governor has offered so far.
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Can Immigrants Save the Housing Market?

Can Immigrants Save the Housing Market? | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
While some remain cynical about homeownership, the U.S.'s foreign-born population still regards it as a symbol of attaining the American Dream.
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Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State?

Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State? | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
Debates over wage-requirements are common at the federal and state level, but now more municipalities are joining the conversation in an attempt to address variations in the cost of living.
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The TRUTH about property developers: how they are exploiting planning authorities and ruining our cities

The TRUTH about property developers: how they are exploiting planning authorities and ruining our cities | The New Public Administration: Arctic Bridge for Social Justice | Scoop.it
The power of the policy to leverage affordable housing has been further eroded since the introduction of community infrastructure levy (CIL) in 2010. A non-negotiable fixed-rate tax on new development, CIL was intended to introduce more transparency and give developers a level of certainty about how much they would be expected to contribute towards infrastructural improvements. But, in reality, it has provided another excuse to dodge Section 106 obligations. A further change to the town planning act last year has made Section 106 agreements renegotiable, allowing review and appeal of all existing obligations, in a misguided attempt to promote growth – which simply makes it easier for developers to wriggle out of their promises, as happened in Tottenham and elsewhere.

“Not surprisingly, developers are now even keener to renegotiate the S106 after they’ve got planning permission, finding they can’t negotiate the CIL,” says Peter Rees. “In most cases, they manage to prove that they can no longer afford to pay for the affordable housing that they agreed – it’s simply ‘not viable’ any more.” One planning officer puts it succinctly: “There has never been a worse time to give schemes consent, in terms of securing public benefit.”

In all cases, how developers prove what they can afford to pay for comes down to the dark art of “viability”. The silver bullet of planning applications, the viability appraisal explains, through impenetrable pages of spreadsheets and fastidious appendixes, exactly how a project stacks up financially. It states, in carefully worded sub-clauses, just why it would be impossible for affordable housing to be provided, why the towers must of course be this height, why no ground-floor corner shop or surgery can be included, why workspace is out of the question; indeed, why it is inconceivable for the scheme to be configured in any other form. Presented as a precise science, viability is nothing of the sort; it is a form of bureaucratic alchemy, figures fiddled with spreadsheet spells that can be made to conjure any outcome desired.

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