The New Patient-D...
Follow
Find
11.7K views | +0 today
The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
How is the patient-physician relationship changing due to the internet, online social networks, and mobiles?
Curated by Camilo Erazo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

What Must We Know About What Our Doctors Know?

What Must We Know About What Our Doctors Know? | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
“The most important thing I learned was that different doctors know different things: I need to ask my internist different questions than I do my oncologist.”

This was not some sweet ingénue recounting the early lessons she learned from a recent encounter with health care. Nope. It was a 62-year-old woman whose husband has been struggling with multiple myeloma for the last eight years and who herself has chronic back pain, high blood pressure and high cholesterol and was at the time well into treatment for breast cancer.

Part of me says “Ahem. Have you been paying attention here?” and another part says “Well of course! How were you supposed to know this? Have any of your physicians ever described their scope of expertise or practice to you?”

I can see clinicians rolling their eyes at the very thought of having such a discussion with every patient. And I can imagine some of us on the receiving end thinking that when raised by a clinician, these topics are disclaimers, an avoidance of accountability and liability.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Los foros de pacientes en internet, útiles para los médicos

Los foros de pacientes en internet, útiles para los médicos | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
Las comunidades de pacientes en internet no sólo permiten intercambiar experiencias y apoyo moral entre personas que presentan una misma patología, también representan una gran oportunidad para que los profesionales sanitarios puedan conocer desde otra perspectiva las preocupaciones cotidianas de sus pacientes.

Esto ha quedado de manifiesto durante el Seminario E-pacientes, web 2.0 y empowerment, organizado por la Fundación Víctor Grífols i Lucas, en colaboración con el Observatorio de la Comunicación Científica de la Universidad Pompeu Fabra (UPF) que encabezan Vladimir de Semir y Gema Revuelta.'

Información completa en Diario Médico: http://www.diariomedico.com/2011/05/18/area-profesional/gestion/foros-de-pacientes-en-internet-utiles-para-medicos
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Entrevista a Ignacio Basagoiti

Ignacio Basagoiti Bilbao. Médico de Familia. C. S. Buñol e Investigador de ITACA-TSB. ¿Qué le ofrece Internet a los médicos?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Should doctors be addressed by their first name?

I suspect the blurring of casual and corporate that has occurred in the rest of the business world is happening in medicine. I am addressed by my first name in the vast majority of transactions I undertake as a customer, almost always by people who don’t know me. Perhaps the “Doctor” title is yet another casualty of that blurring. I would, however, argue against allowing the traditional cues of our professional identity to erode.

Unlike most other businesses and professions, we physicians have a sacred contract with our patients. They allow us into the most private and intimate details of their lives. In return, we pledge to maintain stringent professional boundaries related to our behavior and give them the best of our intellect and compassion. Being addressed as “Doctor” is a constant reminder to me – and to everyone I interact with - of the oath I took to fulfill that pledge.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Una adecuada comunicación con el médico de familia tiene un efecto terapéutico sobre el paciente

"La relación médico-paciente es la piedra angular de la asistencia clínica. En ocasiones, la mejor labor diagnóstica y terapéutica pierden eficacia si el paciente no recibe información de forma adecuada", sostiene el presidente de semFYC, Josep Basora.

Y es que la entrevista clínica y la comunicación con el paciente constituyen las principales herramientas de trabajo con las que cuenta el médico de familia en su consulta diaria. De hecho, los objetivos principales del médico, diagnosticar y tratar enfermedades, están muchas veces condicionados por su destreza en la comunicación con los pacientes y sus familias.

"La solución a gran número de problemas de salud que son habituales en las consultas del médico de familia pasa, en muchos casos, por lograr una comunicación fluida y cordial con el paciente", admite el presidente del Comité Organizador del Congreso y miembro del Grupo Comunicación y Salud de semFYC, José Ignacio Torres.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Safety net populations do benefit from online PHRs: poster at ICSI/IHI Colloquium--e-Patient Dave

Safety net populations do benefit from online PHRs: poster at ICSI/IHI Colloquium--e-Patient Dave | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
a poster presentation addressed some questions people often ask about patient participation and online health records:

* Will patients with problems actually use a PHR (personal health record)? (Many observers say PHRs are a non-starter, a pointless exercise.)
* Especially, will poor people use one?
o Obviously, most don’t even have a computer.
o Plus, computer literacy is necessary, and education levels among the poor are statistically lower. Frankly, are such people smart enough? (Many observers won’t come out and say it, but in my experience that’s what it boils down to.)
o Note: People in lower socio-economic tiers are often referred to as “safety net” populations – they can’t afford insurance, so the only care they get is whatever “safety net” their state or region provides.
* What about people with mental diagnoses – substance abuse, depression (low motivation?), etc.?

Those are the questions examined by this project, produced by an Emory University team headed by Benjamin Druss, MD, MPH and funded by a grant from AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). They studied a population of safety net patients with at least one mental illness diagnosis and one or more additional conditions (co-morbidities).

Final results (including health outcomes) won’t be available until this fall, but clear evidence has emerged about PHR use (and benefits):

* Access to computers less of a barrier than anticipated
* Low digital literacy: Significant portion of participants; but can be successfully addressed with basic computer training.
* Usefulness for coordination of medical care [is] less than anticipated
* Interactions with clinicians: PHR print-outs help consumer take charge
* Overcoming initial reluctance by clinicians: improved interactions with “activated” consumers and access to hard-to-obtain health information.
* “Activated” consumers take over directing their own health care.
o “Activation” was assessed using the well known PAM (Patient Activation Measure) test, developed at the University of Oregon and currently marketed by Insignia Health. (See the behaviors that are said to be predicted by PAM.)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

New Survey Finds Gap in Doctor-Patient Migraine Communication

New Survey Finds Gap in Doctor-Patient Migraine Communication | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
Could migraine patients be doing more to get the most out of their medical visits? According to a new national survey released by the National Headache Foundation (NHF) and GlaxoSmithKline, the answer is yes. For the nearly 30 million migraine sufferers in the U.S., including six million treating with prescription medication, these survey results may have important implications.

The survey, conducted online in November 2010 by Harris Interactive, included 1,218 diagnosed migraine patients taking prescription medications for their migraine attacks as well as 533 physicians who treat between five and 10 migraine patients per week. The findings revealed disparities between what patients and physicians each reported typically discussing during office visits.

One reason for this gap may be that migraines are often addressed as part of a larger health discussion instead of as a point of focus. According to the survey, patients saw their primary migraine healthcare provider an average of six times in the past year, but 70 percent of these visits were related to other health conditions. Despite this, nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of patients reported migraines were discussed on visits where migraine was not the primary reason for the visit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Pacientes 2.0: nos gusta AEAL | Planneando

Pacientes 2.0: nos gusta AEAL | Planneando | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
Como diría Jane Austen, “es una verdad universalmente conocida” que los pacientes han ganado peso en el entorno sanitario de nuestro país. Durante los últimos 15 años, españoles afectados por múltiples enfermedades han tejido redes para unirse y empezar a defender su derecho a saber, a opinar, a conocer, a decidir y a intervenir en todo lo que tenga que ver con su patología. A partir de aquí, son muchos los ejemplos de asociaciones, federaciones y colectivos que han superado barreras para ganar protagonismo en el sector de la salud en España.

En los últimos años, con el crecimiento masivo del entorno online, estas asociaciones han volcado su presencia y actividad en Internet. En general y como dicen muchos, el e-paciente ha llegado. Aunque nos gustan iniciativas reales y enormemente activas como patientslikeme, también defendemos la personalización…. Los colectivos españoles han sabido aceptar que sin página web no existían y han sabido aprovechar que esa misma página web podía ser un trampolín eficaz para trasladar mensajes, para llegar a los afectados y para universalizar su compromiso con la información y la acción. Con mayor o menor presencia, estos grupos de pacientes han aterrizado en el mundo 2.0 para despegar hacia fronteras que hace dos décadas eran impensables.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Participatory medicine TEDx Maastricht (subtitulado en español)

Excelente video del Profesor Bas Bloem en TEDx Maastricht, donde se impartieron sesiones sobre el futuro de la salud. Bas Bloem es Neurólogo y trabaja en el Departmento of Neurología, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Holanda.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

The Cognitive Traps We All Fall Into

The Cognitive Traps We All Fall Into | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
Diagnostic fetishes

Everything is attributed to a pet diagnosis. Palmieri gives the example of a colleague of his who thinks everything from septic shock to behavior disorders are due to low levels of HDL, which he treats with high doses of niacin. There is a tendency to widen the criteria so that any collection of symptoms can be seen as evidence of the condition. If the hole is big enough, pegs of any shape will fit through. Some doctors attribute everything to food allergies, depression, environmental sensitivities, hormone imbalances, and other favorite diagnoses. CAM is notorious for claiming to have found the one true cause of all disease (subluxations, an imbalance of qi, etc.).

Favorite treatment.

One of his partners put dozens of infants on Cisapride to treat the spitting up that most normal babies do. Even after the manufacturer sent out a warning letter about babies who had died from irregular heart rhythms, she continued using it. Eventually the drug was recalled.

Another colleague prescribed cholestyramine for every patient with diarrhea: not only ineffective but highly illogical.

When I was an intern on the Internal Medicine rotation, the attending physician noticed one day that every single patient on our service was getting guaifenesin. We thought we had ordered it for valid reasons, but I doubt whether everyone benefited from it.

(siga leyendo para otros interesante casos de sesgo cognitivo)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

El e-paciente y la medicina participativa

Marian Sandmaier es una periodista de información sanitaria que vio publicada una historia personal en el Washington Post en el año 2004. ¿El motivo? Su madre había descubierto gracias a la información recogida en Internet que un tratamiento recetado por su médico de cabecera le estaba provocando un grave efecto secundario con riesgo para su vida, una señal que el médico no supo reconocer ni identificar su causa. Este caso de Marian Sandmaier es sólo uno de tantos ejemplos de pacientes que ya no se conforman con las respuestas de su médico si estas no les convencen y buscan otras respuestas con ayuda de las nuevas tecnologías.

Fue el primer caso recogido por la prensa al que se pasó a llamar e-paciente. El Dr. Tom Ferguson ex editor de la revista Medical Self Magazine (1975-1989) fue el fundador de todo el movimiento denominado e-patient que describía al paciente que es “equipped, enabled, empowered and engaged”.En español estaríamos hablando del paciente equipado (dotado para hacer su trabajo), capacitado, empoderado y comprometido con su salud y con las decisiones referentes al cuidado sobre su salud. Hay quien ha querido ver en esa e- el prefijo con el que se designa al ciudadano que usa las nuevas tecnologías para querer saber más sobre cómo prevenir enfermedades y cómo cuidar de su propia enfermedad pero como vemos por la definición, es mucho más que eso. A raíz de la muerte del Dr. Ferguson, es Dave deBronkart quien ha cogido el rol de portavoz internacional del Movimiento e-paciente. Dave fue diagnosticado de un cáncer avanzado de riñón en 2007 y aprovechó toda la información que la tecnología ponía a su alcance para obtener datos que iban contra su pronóstico de supervivencia de seis meses y lograr con ello ganar la batalla al cáncer. Es co-fundador de la recientemente creada “Sociedad de Medicina participativa” que actúa como un grupo de presión o think tank para defender el papel del paciente en la actualidad, una plataforma a la que se dedica en tiempo completo desde que en el año 2010 abandonara su anterior trabajo.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Compliance happens when it's the patient's treatment plan

It’s condescending to assert that patients have an obligation to comply with the doctor’s treatment plan. In an attempt to avoid the word “compliance,” now patients are supposed to “adhere” to the doctor’s treatment plan. Nomenclature is irrelevant. It’s still condescending to dictate from on high how patients ought to go about living their lives.

The problem is that it’s the doctor’s plan. Without buy-in from the patient, it just won’t work. People do things when it’s to their advantage to do them, and they don’t do them when the costs outweigh the benefits. It applies to other areas of life, and there’s no reason to think that the same philosophy doesn’t apply to medication.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Carmen Flores: ´Maltratan de palabra al paciente, que no se puede defender´

Carmen Flores: ´Maltratan de palabra al paciente, que no se puede defender´ | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
"El médico es un profesional que tiene una responsabilidad, y debe asumirla cuando su error le cuesta la vida o la salud a una persona"

Carmen Flores (Madrid, 1948) es peluquera, pero "la cadena de negligencias" que llevó a su hijo Miguel Ángel a la tetraplejia, y a fallecer el pasado mes de febrero, la impulsaron a crear la asociación El Defensor del Paciente, con doce mil socios y una actitud combativa contra los errores sanitarios. Flores advierte de que la relación médico-paciente "se ha deteriorado, ya no existe", en gran parte por "conceder a los profesionales sanitarios el rango de autoridad"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Médicos creen que su valoración social empeoró - Uruguay

Médicos creen que su valoración social empeoró - Uruguay | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
El 81% de los médicos cree que la valoración social de su profesión empeoró en los últimos cinco años. Esta es una de las conclusiones de un estudio de Cifra sobre las condiciones del ejercicio profesional de los médicos en Uruguay, encargado por el Sindicato Médico del Uruguay. El 48% de los médicos cree que se los valora “poco o nada”.

El 56% cree que la valoración social de su profesión empeoró algo y el 25% cree que empeoró mucho. Cifra explica que los datos comprueban la tendencia negativa de los últimos años. Actualmente, un 48% de los encuestados considera que la sociedad valora poco o nada a los médicos, pero un 40% cree que sí se los valora.

Las razones por las que los médicos creen que la valoración empeoró se desglosan en el informe. El 30% de los médicos cree que el cambio en la valoración social se dio por motivos vinculados a los cambios sociales de los últimos tiempos. Un 25% sostiene que es por motivos relacionados con los propios médicos y en eso se engloba a la formación profesional, los paros y su forma de relacionarse con la sociedad.

Otro dato que surge del informe es que un 41% de los médicos percibe que tiene tiempo suficiente para atender a sus pacientes. Pero sólo el 10% cree que ese tiempo es generoso.

“La mayoría de los médicos están muy satisfechos con lo que hacen, con su trabajo y con su profesión. La satisfacción parece aumentar con los ingresos: los que perciben mayores ingresos están un poco más satisfechos que los que perciben menores ingresos”, se explica.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

Peer-to-peer Healthcare: Crazy. Crazy. Crazy. Obvious.--Susannah Fox

Peer-to-peer Healthcare: Crazy. Crazy. Crazy. Obvious.--Susannah Fox | The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship | Scoop.it
Patients and caregivers know things — about themselves, about each other, about treatments — and they want to share what they know to help other people. Technology helps to surface and organize that knowledge to make it useful for as many people as possible.

An idea whose time has come? Let’s think that through, beginning with an excerpt of Kevin Kelly’s post, The Natural History of a New Idea:

The notion that ideas have lifecycles has many antecedents. Various people get credit with first articulating it. Here is my version:

The Natural History of a New Idea:

1) Outright wacko.
“This is worthless nonsense.”

2) Odd but unproven.
“This is an interesting, but perverse, point of view.”

3) True but trivial.
“This may be correct, but it is quite unimportant.”

4) Obvious.
“What’s new? This is what we’ve said all along.”

Apply to your favorite example.

I’ve seen this abbreviated to: “Crazy. Crazy. Crazy. Obvious.” But I think it’s more useful to pay attention to the gradations. Where along this scale is your idea?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

CONFIDENCIALIDAD MEDICO-PACIENTE | El blog de Julio Mayol

Los pacientes tienen sus derechos. Los médicos no podemos revelar información sobre nuestros pacientes. Además, tenemos que obtener un consentimiento informado antes de que les sometamos a procedimientos o pruebas que les pongan en riesgo. Y esto fue un cambio importante en la forma paternalista en que los médicos trataban a sus pacientes durante siglos.

Ahora, de manera más rápida, trepidante diría yo, se van a producir grandes cambios en la relación médico-paciente. Y les explico el motivo.

Cada vez es más frecuente que un paciente consulte en la red la opinión de otros ciudadanos sobre un determinado médico al que tiene intención de acudir. Esto ha sido criticado por profesionales que veían peligrar su imagen, su fama, su honor o su negocio. Lo cierto es que páginas como Qué Médico han aparecido en nuestro país, al igual que lo han hecho en USA y otros países europeos. Y todo esto es un cambio en la relación médico-paciente.

Pero toda acción lleva consigo una reacción. Y ya en USA hay médicos que se han propuesto hacer firmar a sus pacientes contratos de confidencialidad. Es decir, sólo atienden a un ciudadano si este se compromete a guardar secreto sobre cualquier asunto que atañe a su médico.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Camilo Erazo
Scoop.it!

10 cosas que hay que saber sobre la relación médico-paciente

La relación entre médico y paciente se considera el acto central de la actividad clínica y el escenario principal de la medicina. Una buena comunicación y buen diálogo entre el médico y su paciente es la base para una buena y efectiva consulta clínica que sirva de guía, motive la comprensión, acuerdos y aprendizaje de ambos

Según el contralor médico de Red Salud UC, doctor Gyorgy Szanthó los aspectos esenciales que están en juego en toda relación médico-paciente (RMP) son el humano, el técnico y el económico e indica que elementos como la confianza, la información adecuada y oportuna, claridad de las expectativas y transparencia en lo económico “evitarán muchos problemas y situaciones delicadas”.

El especialista entrega una serie de recomendaciones para mantener una buena RMP y lograr que este encuentro implique una interacción comunicativa destinada a facilitar y mediar el proceso de diagnóstico y tratamiento
more...
No comment yet.