The neuroscience of dyslexia
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Dyslexia is not a disability – it's a gift

Dyslexia is not a disability – it's a gift | The neuroscience of dyslexia | Scoop.it
Sally Gardner: So much has changed since I was an undiagnosed dyslexic at school, but its wonders and contradictions remain hard to convey
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Dyslexia's Role in Forcing Creativity

Dyslexia's Role in Forcing Creativity | The neuroscience of dyslexia | Scoop.it
Mounting evidence shows that many people with dyslexia are highly creative, out-of-the-box thinkers, and neuroimaging studies demonstrate that their brains really do think differently.
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Brain Anatomy Of Dyslexia Differs Between The Sexes

Brain Anatomy Of Dyslexia Differs Between The Sexes | The neuroscience of dyslexia | Scoop.it
Dyslexia defines an anomalous approach to processing information. It is considered a learning disability that impairs a person’s reading comprehension.
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Dyslexia and Autism are Opposites - Implications for Creativity, Late-Blooming / Precocity, and Savant Abilities

Dyslexia and Autism are Opposites - Implications for Creativity, Late-Blooming / Precocity, and Savant Abilities | The neuroscience of dyslexia | Scoop.it

Excerpt: "Structural studies from Michael Casanova and colleagues showed that the brains of dyslexic and autistic subjects had opposite findings. Microcolumns are repeating groups of neurons that share a common dendritic bundle. The microcolumnar hypothesis is the idea that the microcolumn is the basic unit in the cortex, not individual neurons.


"Dyslexia and autism are on opposite tails of the normal distribution of the width of minicolumns...Autistic individuals have increased number of smaller minicolumns and dyslexic children have decreased number of larger minicolumns..." When the depth of gyral depths were measured of dyslexics compared to controls, "mean gyral white matter depth was 3.05 mm (SD ± 0.30 mm) in dyslexic subjects and 1.63 mm (SD ± 0.15 mm) in the controls." Researchers speculated that longer connectivity in the brains of dyslexics could account for "a greater capacity for abstract, 'visionary' thinking", but also slower development (late blooming?) including a slower development of reading. Its information like this that should reinforce the idea that dyslexic children should have a differentiated educational program (fewer inappropriate demands at early ages) - and recognition of high creative potential and capacity for abstraction...."


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ALDA's curator insight, January 24, 2013 11:56 PM

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