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Learning Theories for the Digital Age

A slidedeck created for the ELESIG webinar on 9 May, 2013 hosted by Nottingham University
Anne Whaits's insight:

Transformative Learning, Connectivism, 'New' Social Constructivism, Personalised Learning, Personal Learning Networks, Distributed Learning, Self-Organised Learning, Heutagogy (Self-Determined Learning), Rhizomatic Learning - some of the emerging theories of learning in a changing context and the digital age.

 

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Ian Olney's curator insight, July 24, 2013 9:07 PM

More academics need to be aware of these ideas

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 9, 2:19 PM

There are some interesting slides and ideas. For example, wisdom is included as the bridge between knowledge and transforming. Just knowing something does not change us unless we apply and use knowledge wisely.

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The Network is the Learning
A progressive inquiry project on emerging learning theories
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Learning Theories for the Digital Age

A slidedeck created for the ELESIG webinar on 9 May, 2013 hosted by Nottingham University
Anne Whaits's insight:

Transformative Learning, Connectivism, 'New' Social Constructivism, Personalised Learning, Personal Learning Networks, Distributed Learning, Self-Organised Learning, Heutagogy (Self-Determined Learning), Rhizomatic Learning - some of the emerging theories of learning in a changing context and the digital age.

 

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Ian Olney's curator insight, July 24, 2013 9:07 PM

More academics need to be aware of these ideas

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 9, 2:19 PM

There are some interesting slides and ideas. For example, wisdom is included as the bridge between knowledge and transforming. Just knowing something does not change us unless we apply and use knowledge wisely.

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Digital Age Learning

A keynote presentation for the sixth Computer Supported Education Conference in Barcelona, Spain, on 3 April 2014.
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Building the New Skills of the Networked Workplace

Presentation at the Charity Learning Consortium Conference, 27 November 2013
Anne Whaits's insight:

Jane Hart @C4LTP positions the next generation of workplace learning practices in the age of knowledge sharing and collaboration.

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Social Learning: the changing face of workplace learning

Keynote, ICELW, New York, 12 June 2014
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Ali Anani's curator insight, December 24, 2013 12:20 AM

Social learning, social funding, social outsourcing and many more are making the new landscape of business

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 24, 2013 1:58 PM

Learning is a social process even when we pick up a book. We engage in a conversation with an author and our self.

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A Concept Map of All The Learning Theories

A Concept Map of All The Learning Theories | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it
Anne Whaits's insight:

While the interactive concept map provides a lovely summary of the major learning theories and theorists, it does not [yet] include any of the emerging learning theories such as Siemens' Connectivism. Limited in that embedded links are to Wikipedia only. Nonetheless, a great visual of the key players and concepts.

Explore it directly here: http://cmapspublic3.ihmc.us/rid=1LGVGJY66-CCD5CZ-12G3/Learning%20Theory.cmap

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Can You MOOC Your Way to a Career? - Q&A With Kio Stark, Author of "Don't Go Back to School" - moocnewsandreviews.com

Can You MOOC Your Way to a Career? - Q&A With Kio Stark, Author of "Don't Go Back to School" - moocnewsandreviews.com | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it
Kio Stark, author of Don’t Go Back to School, talks about how independent learners are using MOOCs and other online learning resources.
Anne Whaits's insight:

A must read with some very interesting insights shared. Those that resonate with me most include:

"Independent Learning doesn't mean learning by yourself"

"Learning is a social process. ...MOOCs are not yet designed with that social aspect of learning in mind."

"It's a messy process and not easier than school necessarily."

"An employer who isn’t looking at candidates who don’t have degrees is going to  be leaving out some of the best people. The concept of having the ability to  learn on the job being essential is really important, and being an independent  learner is a de facto qualification for that."


Read more: http://moocnewsandreviews.com/can-you-mooc-your-way-to-a-career-qa-with-kio-stark-author-of-dont-go-back-to-school/#ixzz2SjjHx2b3

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The pedagogical foundations of massive open online courses | David G. Glance, Martin Forsey & Miles Riley - First Monday

In 2011, the respective roles of higher education institutions and students worldwide were brought into question by the rise of the massive open online course (MOOC). MOOCs are defined by signature characteristics that include: lectures formatted as short videos combined with formative quizzes; automated assessment and/or peer and self–assessment and an online forum for peer support and discussion. Although not specifically designed to optimise learning, claims have been made that MOOCs are based on sound pedagogical foundations that are at the very least comparable with courses offered by universities in face–to–face mode. To validate this, we examined the literature for empirical evidence substantiating such claims. Although empirical evidence directly related to MOOCs was difficult to find, the evidence suggests that there is no reason to believe that MOOCs are any less effective a learning experience than their face–to–face counterparts. Indeed, in some aspects, they may actually improve learning outcomes.


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Maria Persson's comment, May 26, 2013 9:00 PM
Appreciate your comments Paulo - insightful and provokes further thought. Thanks for the comment.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, May 31, 2013 6:46 AM
Great comment Paulo!
Hein Holthuizen's curator insight, September 29, 2013 3:27 AM

A great outcome for those who don't like travelling (not me) and want to train/teach those who are in need of knowledge they are able to give.

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Connectivism: Learning Theory for the Future?

Connectivism: Learning Theory for the Future? | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it
Connectivism: The pipe is more important than the content within the pipe. Our ability to learn what we need for tomorrow is more important than what we know today.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Anne Whaits's insight:

It is my view that one of the most significant statements made by George Siemens is this one: "As knowledge continues to grow and evolve, access to what is needed is more important than what the learner currently possesses." 

 

The role of teaching (and learning) then needs to shift in several ways to support this. How do we support students in selecting, discerning, organising this information and critically reflecting on it? How do we support students in creating new ways of evidencing their learning? How do we encourage students to create content themselves that adds to this growing and evolving abundance of information and knowledge generation?

 

"The Network is the Learning"....another of George Siemens' statements that resonates so well with me.

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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, May 1, 2013 2:14 PM

Can connectivism contribute to a more evidence based form of educational reform?

Carlos Castaño's comment, May 10, 2013 10:08 AM
Quizá no sea aún una teoría del aprendizaje en sentido estricto del término, pero su influencia es innegable. Es, sin duda, un intento de articular una teoría del aprendizaje que entiende la Red. Y ese es el mejor comienzo
Carlos Lizarraga Celaya's curator insight, May 10, 2013 12:46 PM

Connectivism is the integration of principles explored by chaos, network, and complexity and self-organization theories.

In a knowledge economy, the flow of information is the equivalent of the oil pipe in an industrial economy…

The pipe is more important than the content within the pipe. Our ability to learn what we need for tomorrow is more important than what we know today. A real challenge for any learning theory is to actuate known knowledge at the point of application. When knowledge, however, is needed, but not known, the ability to plug into sources to meet the requirements becomes a vital skill. As knowledge continues to grow and evolve, access to what is needed is more important than what the learner currently possesses.

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In Pursuit of In(ter)dependent Learning: Kio Stark

In Pursuit of In(ter)dependent Learning: Kio Stark | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it

" How to learn anything outside formal schooling - Kio Stark and the Peeragogy Project"

Anne Whaits's insight:

A post by Howard Rheingold and his video interview with Kio Stark, author of  Don’t Go Back to School, “ a handbook based on over 80 interviews with people who have successfully taught themselves a wide variety of skills and subjects outside of school. An exploration of peer-to-peer learning through netwroks and connections online.

 

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5 reasons to do a MOOC & 5 reasons not to

Some background to MOOCs and then reasons why an educator might, or might not, want to offer one, based on my experience.
Anne Whaits's insight:

I had the pleasure of attending Prof Martin Weller's session on MOOC's at the OU on 13 March and enjoyed his take on "to MOOC or not to MOOC" as part of Open Education Week. A real delight to meet @mweller. Read more on his blog "The Ed Techie"  here  http://nogoodreason.typepad.co.uk/

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Kevin Williams's curator insight, September 26, 2013 6:02 AM

Martain Weller's ideas. Nothing shatteringly new, but 'comforting'

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The Professors Who Make the MOOCs

The Professors Who Make the MOOCs | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it

What is it like to teach 10,000 or more students at once, and does it really work? The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom.

 

The survey, conducted by The Chronicle, attempted to reach every professor who has taught a MOOC. The online questionnaire was sent to 184 professors in late February, and 103 of them responded.


Via Faculty Focus
Anne Whaits's insight:

Very interesting survey results!

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TEDxGlasgow - Donald Clark - More pedagogic change in 10 years than last 1000 years

Search, links, media sharing, social media, Wikipedia, games, open source etc. are ground breaking shifts in the way we learn, says Donald Clark. Unfortunate...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Terese Bird
Anne Whaits's insight:

The real scalibility in education comes with the Internet....freeing education from a place and from a specific time. With this comes changing pedagogies including peer-learning. Donald makes a case for recording lectures - videos provide opportunity for repeated access to new content. Some familiar messages here and interesting focus on scalibility.

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Issues in Online Education

Issues in Online and Distance Education Professor Mike Keppell Executive DirectorAustralian Digital Futures Institute

Via Paulo Simões
Anne Whaits's insight:

A really good overview of the issues in Online and Distance Education. Prof Keppell explores the context, the enablers, digital literacies, personalised learning and user generated content. He raises questions about the skills students need to succeed and how we can assist students to manage the transition into digital life.

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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, March 10, 2013 6:35 PM

I do agree. We need learn how to learn on line.

uTOP Inria's curator insight, March 11, 2013 4:56 AM

Quelles problématiques l'enseignement en ligne soulève-t-il ? Quelles compétences les étudiants doivent-il développer ? Cette présentation nous donne quelques élèments de réponse, en se fondant sur l'étude "Ten Years of Trancking Online Education". (University of Southern Queensland - Pas de date)

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The Beautiful, Messy, Inspiring, and Harrowing World of Online Learning

Keynote at the 2014 BCNET conference in Vancouver, BC. In this presentation I shared stories of learners' and scholars' experiences online, arising from multiple years of qualitative research studies, and framed in the context of the historic realities of educational technology practice. These stories illustrate how emerging technologies and open practices have (a) broadened access to education, (b) reinforced privilege, and (c) re-imagined the ways that academics enact and share scholarship. They also illustrate the multiple realities that exist in online education practice, and the differences between reality and potential and beautiful vs. ugly online education..
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Assessment in Open Spaces

Keynote presentation for eAssessment Scotland conference #easc13, University of Dundee, 23rd August 2013
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The Future of Learning, Networked Society

"In the Networked Society, connectivity will be the starting point for new ways of innovating, collaborating and socializing. AMAZING VIDEO." Kenneth Mikkelsen @LeadershipABC

Anne Whaits's insight:

Produced by Ericsson, this is a thought provoking 20 minute video worth viewing. It features insightful commentary on the Future of Learning  from Seth Godin, Sugata Mita, Stephen Heppell, Jose Ferreira and Daphne Koller amongst others. While the message may not be new to many of us, there are many more who still need to hear it.

Connect to Learn! Adaptive and personalised learning! Access to information! Point minds to the right kinds of questions! Learn through the network!

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Dr. Doris Molero's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:06 PM

Yep... it's coming... it's here... Seth Goday, Stephen Heppel, Sugata Mitra, Jose Ferreiram, Lois Mbugua, Margaret Kositany.. Dafne Keller.... share some of their ideas on the future of education..... Content is becoming a commodity that you can find everywhere and available  to almost everyone... Education should go back to having instructors and student engage in dialogues, where thinkinf skills, problem solving and discipline passion are present...

 

Kids should be solving interesting problems anot just memorizing answers to probles already solved--- we should look at students in their eyes and believe in them and push them forward...

 

Teachers should be saying.. The topic for today is this--- Now, open your notebooks and le's explore and find out about it.. 

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, July 23, 2013 3:01 PM

Video muy interesante sobre el futuro del aprendizaje y las potencialidades de la sociedad conectada.

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Surviving the Day of the MOOCs

A look at my own experience running a MOOC and the implications for Higher ed, and a call to arms!
Anne Whaits's insight:

Martin Weller from OU shares some great insights in this presentation from tech issues to learner issues and the need for student support and more.

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Who are we now that We're Online? Connected Learners, Connected Educators

What does it mean to be a networked teacher-learner hybrid?
Anne Whaits's insight:

Love slide 5: "Newly emerging species: open, public learner/educators"

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Learning to ‘run a MOOC’ ...the iMOOC (Interactive MOOCS)

Learning to ‘run a MOOC’ ...the iMOOC (Interactive MOOCS) | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it
There are more learner interactivity options available than multiple–choice questions and ‘drag and drop’ responses, says Bob Little.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Anne Whaits's insight:

Some really interesting reflections and comments in this article. What makes the current form of MOOCs particularly challenging for the learner? Poonam argues that effective learning materials involve the learners and makes a case for the interactive MOOC - the iMOOC. "Those wanting to build iMOOCS – or at least include greater learner interactivity into their courses – could gather inspiration for their instructional design strategy from interactivity building tools."

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, May 7, 2013 4:24 PM

Many teacher want to get their classes online for various reasons. The info here will help anyone set it up more professionally.

Richard L. Edwards's curator insight, May 10, 2013 12:24 PM

Certain "truisms" run through articles written on MOOCs. One of the more consistent "stories" repeated from article to article involves the completion rate of MOOCs, hovering around 7%. There are many reasons why MOOCs have low completion rates, but typically the "story" is told as one of MOOC design failure, as in this piece. Quote from this article: "“To engage learners and keep them interested in the course - and motivated to continue and complete it, there’s a need to develop MOOCs that are highly interactive (iMOOCs). No wonder that MOOCs’ learner drop-out rates are extremely high,” [Poonam Jaypuriya] commented. “According to our information, typically, we’re seeing only seven or eight per cent of learners completing courses.” I agree with the 7% completion rate, which matches my hands-on experience. But I disagree with the assessment of why 93% of my students did not complete my MOOC. In fact, let's consider the admission requirements for a MOOC. Typically, a student submits an email address. There is no transcript verification, there is no statement of commitment (i.e. how much this "learner" will prioritize a free class when other life and work events occur during the course), and no really penalty from just dropping out of the course at any time for any reason. MOOCs are a fascinating experiment, and while some MOOCs clearly have a way to go to fully leverage the full and already available possibilities of a quality engaging online education, that is not the fundamental reason for low completion rates. MOOC providers need to figure out how to secure learning commitments from students. And to play the contrarian on this issue, I would argue that the top retention tools of traditional higher education have been tuition cost, admissions standards, and verifiable transcripts, not the quality of course design (and I mean course design principles as opposed to faculty reputation). 

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Learning Networks: Theory and Practice

Talk at the opening of the International Conference on Methods and Technologies for Learning at the Palazzo dei Normanni, Palermo, Sicily. Unfortunately rushed,
Anne Whaits's insight:

A very useful presentation given by Stephen Downes some years ago and recently shared again on SlideShare. According to Downes, Learning Networks different to Traditional Online Learning in that they are not institution based, not product based and not content based (and this is true in my experience of my own growing learning network).  He provides the basic elements and properties of Networks; outlines eight Network Design Principles; the elements of Network Semantics; and positions Connectivism as Network Pedagogy. Would be great to read more research on the Practice of Learning Networks and how those are developing and impacting traditional HEIs and Online Learning.

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Presentation of self in digital life

An invited research seminar for staff at the University of Reading, presented on 30 April, 2013.
Anne Whaits's insight:

@timbuckteeth - great viewing his exploration of digital identities, literacies and pedagogies.

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Grading the MOOC University

Grading the MOOC University | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it
Take away the dorm rooms, the classroom banter, the brown-nosing, the keg parties and the tuition, and is it still college?

Via Smithstorian
Anne Whaits's insight:

Strange paradox - MOOC professors the least and most assessible teachers in history.

This opinion piece reflects one person's experience of several MOOC's - interesting grading nonetheless.

THE PROFESSORS: B+

CONVENIENCE: A

TEACHER-TO-STUDENT INTERACTION: D

STUDENT-TO-STUDENT INTERACTION: B-

ASSIGNMENTS: B-

OVERALL EXPERIENCE: B

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Smithstorian's curator insight, April 22, 2013 5:29 PM

I learned many fascinating things while taking a series of free online college courses over the last few months. In my history class, I learned there was a Japanese political plot to assassinate Charlie Chaplin in 1932. In my genetics class, I learned that the ability to wiggle our ears is a holdover from animal ancestors who could shift the direction of their hearing organs.


But the first thing I learned? When it comes to Massive Open Online Courses, like those offered byCoursera, Udacity and edX, you can forget about the Socratic method.

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Network technology, disruptive innovation and the future

This is the presentation I gave to the SAFFIRE launch festival at the University of Canberra on Monday 18 March, 2013

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Anne Whaits's insight:

For me the affordances of technology and the associated potential disruptive innovations possible in higher education are exciting indeed! I am not sure that DI spells the demise of the brick and mortar university as we know it ... for many the face-to-face contact and engagement is key to success while others prefer the total online experience. It is my view that different blends will emerge in different contexts and significant shifts from old models of teaching to new models of learning will be made. I really like the notion of the "multiversity".

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Will Stewart's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:48 AM

In terms of most HE institutions, DI would really only enable them catch up with 30 years of using technology to do what they have always done, and resisting any significant changes.

Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 28, 2013 8:04 AM

The 'I' in the above is Mark Smithers. Although you really miss the voice that goes with the slides, the slides themselves already provide a lot of food for thought. There's one comment I would like to add to what Anne already said.

I am starting the feel uneasy about the term 'disruptive innovation'. As a descriptive term of past events it probably makes good sense, but as a label for current events, such as the mushrooming of MOOCs, it almost takes on a prescriptive guise. Its use almost implies that universities should stop thinking about their future, there is no point doing so as there is none.  MOOCs being a disruptive innovation are bound to take over from them. To be sure, Mark doesn't say so, indeed, he discusses reactions universities should have. However, pictures like the one of a huge, grounded ship easily evoke an image of inability timely to change course. Before you know it, such descriptions become self-fulilling prophecies (something which of course some people are only too keen to emphasise, as is evidenced by another one of this week's scoops of mine: http://sco.lt/89vrjF) (@pbsloep)

Patricia Daniels's curator insight, March 28, 2013 11:24 AM

H817 students. A lot of points made that are relevant to what we are doing at the moment. I share the same sentiments as Anne Whaits and feel that we'll be seeing more diversity in the future, or as Smither's terms it 'Multiversity'.

 

I heard an interesting comment from one of my advanced English language students today in response to the topic, 'Young people have too many opportunities nowadays'. Her reply was, 'No that's not true, we have choices. We have more choices now that suit different learners. I think it's great.'

 

Perhaps we need to listen more intensely to the student voice?

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Open education MOOC

Open education MOOC | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it

"There are many different 'flavours' or interpretations of what openness means in education. This study unit is an example of a massive open online course (MOOC) and spans seven weeks. Like all the free materials in the OpenLearn Try section, this unit is open to the wider world but, uniquely, it also forms part of the module for students who are studying The Open University course H817, 'Openness and innovation in elearning'.

After studying this course, you will:

understand the issues in open educationbe able to critically appraise the evidence around open educationhave experienced what it is like to participate in an open course."
Anne Whaits's insight:

A 7 week MOOC which focuses on openness in education, OER, moving beyond OER, MOOCs, pedagogy in open learning and operating in an open world. OU have taken an interesting approach in that not only is the MOOC open to inofrmal learners across the globe, but students registered for a particular module at Masters level are also participating as part of the module requirements. This MOOC starts 16 March 2013.

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A Tale of Two MOOCs @ Coursera: Divided by Pedagogy

A Tale of Two MOOCs @ Coursera: Divided by Pedagogy | The Network is the Learning | Scoop.it
The Web as a classroom is transforming how people learn, is driving the need for new pedagogy; two recently launched courses at Cousera highlight what happens when pedagogical methods fail to adapt...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Anne Whaits's insight:

A really good post which argues that it is the learning orientation that determines the pedagogical method selected for instruction. The comparision of pedagogical methods employed in two courses on Coursera reveal the clashes between the views on how people learn.

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Maria Toro-Troconis's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:29 AM

Excellent article about the differences in the Pedagogic models: xMOOCs and cMOOCs, followed by two Coursera courses.