The Mobile Career
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The Mobile Career
People on average only stay 4.4-4.6 years in a job. Establishing career strategies is key to ensure upward mobility and long term career satisfaction
Curated by Amanda Fajak
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Duke University survey: Companies have work to do when it comes to company culture - Triangle Business Journal

Duke University survey: Companies have work to do when it comes to company culture Triangle Business Journal New research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business shows that more than 90 percent of executives said culture is important at...

Via Culture Digs
Amanda Fajak's insight:

Following a 13 month study, Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business add further powerful evidence to the importance of culture.

 

"90 percent of executives said culture is important at their firms, and 78 percent said culture is among the top five things that make their company valuable. However, only 15 percent said their own corporate culture is exactly where it needed to be, and 92 percent said they believe improving their firm's corporate culture would improve the value of the company.

 

When talking mergers the study involved asking CEOs if they would discount a target if the culture was misaligned. Thirty percent said they would discount the offer up to 30 percent, and an extraordinary 46 percent would not even make an offer."

 

As our recent research with investment analysts reinforced. Culture Counts!

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Amanda Fajak's curator insight, November 18, 2015 9:52 PM
Amanda Fajak's insight:

Following a 13 month study, Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business add further powerful evidence to the importance of culture.

 

"90 percent of executives said culture is important at their firms, and 78 percent said culture is among the top five things that make their company valuable. However, only 15 percent said their own corporate culture is exactly where it needed to be, and 92 percent said they believe improving their firm's corporate culture would improve the value of the company.

 

When talking mergers the study involved asking CEOs if they would discount a target if the culture was misaligned. Thirty percent said they would discount the offer up to 30 percent, and an extraordinary 46 percent would not even make an offer."

 

As our recent research with investment analysts reinforced. Culture Counts!

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How becoming a non-executive director could help your career - NEDworks

How becoming a non-executive director could help your career - NEDworks | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Many professionals with portfolio careers become non-executive directors to gain extra experience and income. (How becoming a non-executive director could help your career - Re-posted from the Guardian Thursday 4...

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Rick Yvanovich's curator insight, December 29, 2012 5:33 AM

Isn't it a logical progression for a CIMA to become a NED?

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Taking Initiative for Your Career Growth

Taking Initiative for Your Career Growth | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Being involved with Gen Y, and seeing how the economy has affected career growth and mobility for recent grads and early careerists; I can’t help but notice some of the pain points they regularly v...

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Switching Careers at Midlife to Make a Difference

Switching Careers at Midlife to Make a Difference | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Many people who have spent 30 years in one career are deciding to undertake the difficult task of changing jobs to do something they find more rewarding. (!

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Piecing together the jigsaw: how to write a CV for portfolio careerists

Piecing together the jigsaw: how to write a CV for portfolio careerists | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Traditional CVs often don't suit professionals with portfolio careers. Clare Whitmell looks at how to layout and design your CV if you have a mosaic work history

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The Dominance Of 'Western' Management Theories In South-East Asian ... - Eurasia Review

The Dominance Of 'Western' Management Theories In South-East Asian ... - Eurasia Review | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it

After the Second World War many South-East Asian nations had to work hard for independence from their colonial masters. After more than 50 years of self government in some cases, many of these nations have developed relative urban affluence where consumerism and enterprise dominates life. Career development and upward mobility often requires a diploma, degree, and post graduate qualifications. However, a colonial hangover and psychological dependence still lingers on. All these awards, especially within the business, entrepreneurship, and management disciplines are heavily based upon “Western” theories and ideas, embedding the occidental mindset within the South-East Asian “psych”.


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What “Mad Men” Can Teach Us About Employment in 2013 - Fox and Hounds Daily

What “Mad Men” Can Teach Us About Employment in 2013 - Fox and Hounds Daily | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
What “Mad Men” Can Teach Us About Employment in 2013
Fox and Hounds Daily
... and experience.
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Experts stress the importance of teaching children innovation - Deseret News

Experts stress the importance of teaching children innovation - Deseret News | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Deseret News Experts stress the importance of teaching children innovation Deseret News They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...
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Hone the Job You Have Into One You Love - New York Times

Hone the Job You Have Into One You Love - New York Times | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Hone the Job You Have Into One You Love
New York Times
Through what she calls job crafting, people can reshape and redefine their jobs.
Amanda Fajak's insight:

A great example of how we can all take responsibility for our own career and our own happiness at work.

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Video: Staying Foolish. Steve Jobs 2005 Commencement Speech

Video: Staying Foolish. Steve Jobs 2005 Commencement Speech | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it

"By now you’ve probably seen Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement address. It was personal, moving, and wise in a way that most commencement addresses only seek to be... I watched it again today with my 12 year-old daughter–one of those awkward/forced sit here and watch this deals. What really stood out for me this time was the his insistence on creating your own path even when things don’t seem to be lining up–that the dots can only be connected looking back. That, combined with the concept of “staying foolish,” created a powerful message."


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The Strategic Case for Changing Jobs - Ahlan Jobs

There are many deeply personal reasons to change your employment situation. However, from a purely strategic point of view, there are four good reasons to change jobs within the same (or similar) industry three times during ...
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The Hot New Work Trend: Portfolio Careers

The Hot New Work Trend: Portfolio Careers | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
What it is, how to build one—and why you need to know about it. More

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Telecommuting May Limit Career Upward Mobility, Survey Says | Featured Article - Workforce.com

Telecommuting May Limit Career Upward Mobility, Survey Says. While telecommuting can allow an employee to balance life and work, it may also limit their upward mobility within a company, according to a recent survey by Korn/Ferry International.

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Why has Singapore failed to prepare its citizens adequately for the knowledge economy? Part 2

Why has Singapore failed to prepare its citizens adequately for the knowledge economy? Part 2 | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it

Appold’s main thesis now seems prescient: “I suggest that meritocratic institutions for selecting and grooming elite labor will become increasingly counter-productive. They become so by increasing labor costs and the need to import highly skilled labor. They can also encourage the emigration of some of the most highly trained members of the labor force. Further, they can decrease productivity by discouraging a large proportion of the labor force. Meritocracy may also be at least partially responsible for Singapore’s rather unique labor demography.”[i]

There are several critiques of Singapore’s meritocracy vis-à-vis knowledge work:

Early sorting of potentially valuable workers out of the system
Singapore’s meritocracy sorts students based on relatively narrow educational criteria. As entry to one school can greatly influence admission into the next, students compete ferociously from a very young age.

Today this pre-sorting begins at the preschool level, where children from higher-income families can afford to attend premium institutions while some of those from lower-income families do not attend preschool at all. This places them at very different starting points when they enter primary school.

This pre-sorting tends to demotivate students who do not make it into the elite streams. Some who can afford to will emigrate. Late bloomers have few pathways for educational or career mobility.

“My answer is preliminary and, without additional information, highly speculative,” Mr Appold wrote in 2001. “A system of meritocratic selection has placed large numbers of capable individuals in non-promotable pools, increasing the need to import labor.”

Meritocratic assessment not necessarily correlated with job performance
Those who finally make it may not necessarily be best suited for the job at hand—the correlation between narrow paper-based achievements and knowledge work performance is tenuous. “Although meritocracy is an achievement-based system of stratification, the criteria for the allocation of jobs are not necessarily relevant to the performance of those positions,” says Mr Appold.

Therefore, performance in Singapore’s highly competitive educational system can be a poor predictor of eventual knowledge work quality. One could argue that this holds true for any labour market. However, Singapore society’s laser-like focus on paper achievement perhaps exacerbates the market inefficiency. Hence the argument here is not that paper achievements are irrelevant; but rather that there are many other desirable attributes that Singapore’s meritocracy does not incorporate in its selection process.

There are supply and demand elements at play here. On the labour supply side, there exists a parental and societal culture that greatly values paper achievements over other pursuits. In terms of labour demand, there are many managers in both public and private institutions that continue to place an excessive premium on educational performance from yesteryear—as opposed to current professional attributes.

In 2010, a Singaporean who now works at The Economist Group applied for a job at Singapore’s Ministry of Finance. As soon as this person sat down for the interview, the interviewer said, “I’m sorry, but I see you come from the wrong school.”

Institutionalisation of performance and hiring norms
Over time, meritocracies can breed a strict adherence amongst managers and recruits to performance and hiring norms that can seem archaic in a knowledge economy.

All the performance critiques mentioned above—less willing to challenge convention or question authority; more afraid to take risks/move out of comfort zone; and more likely to display a silo mentality with poor cross-collaboration skills—are arguably as much symptoms of labour supply issues (e.g. educational system) as they are labour demand characteristics (e.g. bosses’ wishes).

So, for instance, an average Singaporean worker may not be as willing to challenge convention or question authority partly because of that person’s development and upbringing—but also surely because that person may have, early on his/her career, worked for a Singaporean manager who discouraged those very things.


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Mobility Takes a Swipe at Jobs - Huffington Post (blog)

Mobility Takes a Swipe at Jobs - Huffington Post (blog) | The Mobile Career | Scoop.it
Mobility Takes a Swipe at Jobs
Huffington Post (blog)
When most of us think about mobility and careers we think about applying for jobs on our mobile devices.
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